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autobahn

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About autobahn

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    Advanced Member

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Lexus Model
    2005 LS430
  1. Here's my tip for this section. I had a non-functioning cigarette lighter socket. It was a bit of a pain as I wanted to use it to charge mobile phones and so on. I had to resort to using the auxilliary power socket in the armrest. I used a small torch to look into the cigarette lighter socket and noticed severe oxidation coating the socket contacts. I was going to take the car in to the dealer to get that sorted when I realised that, from my HiFi days, I had a can of DEOXIT D5 contact cleaner. This is a truly miraculous contact cleaner and dissolves any gunk or oxdiation on metal contacts instantly. I sprayed a tiny amount onto a cotton bud and, WITH THE ENGINE TURNED OFF SO AS NOT TO CREATE A SHORT CIRCUIT, I dabbed the soaked cotton bud onto the centre pin contact of the socket. The DEOXIT D5 instantly soaked into the oxidation and dissolved it. It's important not to spray it directly into the cigarette lighter socket as it'll probably cause a short circuit when you turn the ignition on. Then, using a clean and dry cotton bud, I wiped away any excess contact cleaner. I also cleaned the side metal contacts (the negative terminals) of the cigarette lighter socket using this method, taking care not to bridge the electrical contact between the positive centre pin and the negative side contacts with any fluid. It took two minutes and I have what looks like a brand new cigarette lighter socket that works perfectly. DEOXIT D5 can be used on all electrical contacts and chemically cleans the contacts and protects them from future oxidation. It's a pricey spray (around £17 for a can) but should last many years.
  2. Here's my tip for this section. I had a non-functioning cigarette lighter socket. It was a bit of a pain as I wanted to use it to charge mobile phones and so on. I had to resort to using the auxilliary power socket in the armrest. I used a small torch to look into the cigarette lighter socket and noticed severe oxidation coating the socket contacts. I was going to take the car in to the dealer to get that sorted when I realised that, from my HiFi days, I had a can of DEOXIT D5 contact cleaner. This is a truly miraculous contact cleaner and dissolves any gunk or oxdiation on metal contacts instantly. I sprayed a tiny amount onto a cotton bud and, WITH THE ENGINE TURNED OFF SO AS NOT TO CREATE A SHORT CIRCUIT, I dabbed the soaked cotton bud onto the centre pin contact of the socket. The DEOXIT D5 instantly soaked into the oxidation and dissolved it. It's important not to spray it directly into the cigarette lighter socket as it'll probably cause a short circuit when you turn the ignition on. Then, using a clean and dry cotton bud, I wiped away any excess contact cleaner. I also cleaned the side metal contacts (the negative terminals) of the cigarette lighter socket using this method, taking care not to bridge the electrical contact between the positive centre pin and the negative side contacts with any fluid. It took two minutes and I have what looks like a brand new cigarette lighter socket that works perfectly. DEOXIT D5 can be used on all electrical contacts and chemically cleans the contacts and protects them from future oxidation. It's a pricey spray (around £17 for a can) but should last many years.
  3. Here's my tip for this section. I had a non-functioning cigarette lighter socket. It was a bit of a pain as I wanted to use it to charge mobile phones and so on. I had to resort to using the auxilliary power socket in the armrest. I used a small torch to look into the cigarette lighter socket and noticed severe oxidation coating the socket contacts. I was going to take the car in to the dealer to get that sorted when I realised that, from my HiFi days, I had a can of DEOXIT D5 contact cleaner. This is a truly miraculous contact cleaner and dissolves any gunk or oxdiation on metal contacts instantly. I sprayed a tiny amount onto a cotton bud and, WITH THE ENGINE TURNED OFF SO AS NOT TO CREATE A SHORT CIRCUIT, I dabbed the soaked cotton bud onto the centre pin contact of the socket. The DEOXIT D5 instantly soaked into the oxidation and dissolved it. It's important not to spray it directly into the cigarette lighter socket as it'll probably cause a short circuit when you turn the ignition on. Then, using a clean and dry cotton bud, I wiped away any excess contact cleaner. I also cleaned the side metal contacts (the negative terminals) of the cigarette lighter socket using this method, taking care not to bridge the electrical contact between the positive centre pin and the negative side contacts with any fluid. It took two minutes and I have what looks like a brand new cigarette lighter socket that works perfectly. DEOXIT D5 can be used on all electrical contacts and chemically cleans the contacts and protects them from future oxidation. It's a pricey spray (around £17 for a can) but should last many years.
  4. Here's my tip for this section. I had a non-functioning cigarette lighter socket. It was a bit of a pain as I wanted to use it to charge mobile phones and so on. I had to resort to using the auxilliary power socket in the armrest. I used a small torch to look into the cigarette lighter socket and noticed severe oxidation coating the socket contacts. I was going to take the car in to the dealer to get that sorted when I realised that, from my HiFi days, I had a can of DEOXIT D5 contact cleaner. This is a truly miraculous contact cleaner and dissolves any gunk or oxdiation on metal contacts instantly. I sprayed a tiny amount onto a cotton bud and, WITH THE ENGINE TURNED OFF SO AS NOT TO CREATE A SHORT CIRCUIT, I dabbed the soaked cotton bud onto the centre pin contact of the socket. The DEOXIT D5 instantly soaked into the oxidation and dissolved it. It's important not to spray it directly into the cigarette lighter socket as it'll probably cause a short circuit when you turn the ignition on. Then, using a clean and dry cotton bud, I wiped away any excess contact cleaner. I also cleaned the side metal contacts (the negative terminals) of the cigarette lighter socket using this method, taking care not to bridge the electrical contact between the positive centre pin and the negative side contacts with any fluid. It took two minutes and I have what looks like a brand new cigarette lighter socket that works perfectly. DEOXIT D5 can be used on all electrical contacts and chemically cleans the contacts and protects them from future oxidation. It's a pricey spray (around £17 for a can) but should last many years.
  5. Here's my tip for this section. I had a non-functioning cigarette lighter socket. It was a bit of a pain as I wanted to use it to charge mobile phones and so on. I had to resort to using the auxilliary power socket in the armrest. I used a small torch to look into the cigarette lighter socket and noticed severe oxidation coating the socket contacts. I was going to take the car in to the dealer to get that sorted when I realised that, from my HiFi days, I had a can of DEOXIT D5 contact cleaner. This is a truly miraculous contact cleaner and dissolves any gunk or oxdiation on metal contacts instantly. I sprayed a tiny amount onto a cotton bud and, WITH THE ENGINE TURNED OFF SO AS NOT TO CREATE A SHORT CIRCUIT, I dabbed the soaked cotton bud onto the centre pin contact of the socket. The DEOXIT D5 instantly soaked into the oxidation and dissolved it. It's important not to spray it directly into the cigarette lighter socket as it'll probably cause a short circuit when you turn the ignition on. Then, using a clean and dry cotton bud, I wiped away any excess contact cleaner. I also cleaned the side metal contacts (the negative terminals) of the cigarette lighter socket using this method, taking care not to bridge the electrical contact between the positive centre pin and the negative side contacts with any fluid. It took two minutes and I have what looks like a brand new cigarette lighter socket that works perfectly. DEOXIT D5 can be used on all electrical contacts and chemically cleans the contacts and protects them from future oxidation. It's a pricey spray (around £17 for a can) but should last many years.
  6. Here's my tip for this section. I had a non-functioning cigarette lighter socket. It was a bit of a pain as I wanted to use it to charge mobile phones and so on. I had to resort to using the auxilliary power socket in the armrest. I used a small torch to look into the cigarette lighter socket and noticed severe oxidation coating the socket contacts. I was going to take the car in to the dealer to get that sorted when I realised that, from my HiFi days, I had a can of DEOXIT D5 contact cleaner. This is a truly miraculous contact cleaner and dissolves any gunk or oxdiation on metal contacts instantly. I sprayed a tiny amount onto a cotton bud and, WITH THE ENGINE TURNED OFF SO AS NOT TO CREATE A SHORT CIRCUIT, I dabbed the soaked cotton bud onto the centre pin contact of the socket. The DEOXIT D5 instantly soaked into the oxidation and dissolved it. It's important not to spray it directly into the cigarette lighter socket as it'll probably cause a short circuit when you turn the ignition on. Then, using a clean and dry cotton bud, I wiped away any excess contact cleaner. I also cleaned the side metal contacts (the negative terminals) of the cigarette lighter socket using this method, taking care not to bridge the electrical contact between the positive centre pin and the negative side contacts with any fluid. It took two minutes and I have what looks like a brand new cigarette lighter socket that works perfectly. DEOXIT D5 can be used on all electrical contacts and chemically cleans the contacts and protects them from future oxidation. It's a pricey spray (around £17 for a can) but should last many years.
  7. ^ I understand all of that, but it doesn't negate the lack of confidence of the dealership in the cars they sell and also the blatant lies that they told me. No car should suffer depreciation of £1K per week.
  8. I think the main issue is that the dealer isn't even prepared to buy the car back from me and I think this is down to the missing service stamps. This is despite a verbal reassurance that this would be no problem. Plus the fact that i've never suffered from this level of depreciation. It's kind of ironic that the very same salesperson who sold me the car in the first place, after telling me that the car had done most if its depreciation already, now tells me that the larger Lexus models suffer from very heavy depreciation, just 7 weeks later. I feel i've been misled somewhat.
  9. It appears i've been properly stitched up by my dealer. I bought the car (2005 LS430) with the two missing service stamps 7 weeks ago and the dealer provided a full Lexus Warranty with the car. He also said that there'd be no issue buying the car back in the future and that most of the depreciation on the car had already ocurred. I contacted the dealer earlier this week to see what i'd get for it and he's not interested in buying it back. I then contacted a few other non-Lexus dealerships for part-exchange prices and the best i've had offered for my car is £9K. The car was originally advertised at £17K and I paid £16K for it just 7 weeks ago! That's depreciation of over £1K per week. It's truly mind-boggling. Lexus: never again.
  10. I have a 2005 LS430 and have all of those options, if that helps.
  11. Which Lexus Model Is Best For Me?

    I'm looking at an IS-F or a GS450h. Each car is from a different dealer. The cost to change for me would be very similar for either car. The GS450h is a 2008 model and the IS-F is a late 2009 model. Which car would you go for if the cost to change was very similar (within a couple of £K).
  12. I've currently got a 2005 LS430. However, i'm finding that it's far too much of a car for me! LOL. I only use it to get to work and back and it's really a car to be driven in rather than to drive. So, i'm already looking to 'downsize' to a much smaller Lexus that is more driver-oriented yet still retains the luxury of the LS. Which Lexus model would you recommend for me? I reckon i've got a budget of around £20K for a used Lexus purchase.
  13. ^ Will do at the weekend. I did drive in torrential rain yesterday morning but it was just fairly cold in the evening when the fault occured. However, there is a specific fault message saying something like, "Clean Radar Sensor" for debris I believe.
  14. My radar cruise control failed yesterday with a "Check Cruise System" warning. It was a royal PITA as I use it daily. After I got home I restarted the engine and the warning went away (I was able to arm the cruise control system). I'm hoping it's not a terminal problem but, if it is, the car has a full Lexus warranty so it'll be another thing that needs fixing. Has anyone else has the aforementioned warning appear on their cars?
  15. I called the dealer and they'll just put it through as a warranty claim and order the parts. The time required is 1.5 hours so it's just about a while-u-wait job.