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    • By Lexus Owners Club

      Introduction & Styling
      You may be thinking that the Lexus RC has been around for a little while already now, and you wouldn’t be wrong. However, up until just recently the only model available was the 5.0 litre V8 powered RC F which is likely to remain the enthusiast’s choice thanks to its high CO2 emissions and thirst for super unleaded. With that in mind, Lexus has recently made available “normal” versions of the RC coupe – the RC 300h and RC 200t for Lexus fans looking for a taste of the RC’s looks without the high running costs.

      The model I’m testing is the RC 300h F Sport which I think looks fantastic in “F Sport white” with contrasting “Dark Rose” leather seats – a lovely colour combination. Incidentally the new “Sonic Red” is also a lovely colour – Lexus Hedge End had one in their showroom if you wanted to check it out. The car hasn’t lost any of the wow factor you get with its RC F big brother – the main notable omissions being the bonnet scoop and unique stacked exhausts. Yes, it doesn’t look quite as muscular as its V8 powered sibling, but if you like the look of the RC F then you’re still going to like the look of this. Only enthusiasts will likely spot the difference at a glance – aside from replacing the V8 burble with hybrid silence that is. Speaking of the exhaust, if I’m not mistaken this is the first Lexus hybrid I’ve seen that actually features visible exhaust tips and it looks all the better for it in my opinion, particularly when the RC is much more of a sports car/GT than other models in the range. Lexus previously had a habit of hiding exhaust tips on hybrid models to show off their green credentials, but I’m guessing customer feedback could be responsible for the change.

      Let’s get one thing straight though – this car turns heads. While its styling and large grill may not be to everyone’s tastes (I’m a big fan by the way), it certainly draws looks pretty much all the time. Everywhere I went in the car people would stop and stare or ask me questions about the car, with one pedestrian even going so far as to stop in the road and nearly get run over whilst trying to get a look at the RC. The detailing on this car is exceptional with the LED lights really looking the part and RC 300h even has unique looking fins either side of the rear bumper that remind me of 90’s era Ferraris. Pretty cool stuff then.

      Interior
      The interior of the Lexus RC 300h is a familiar affair if you’ve ever been in a 3rd generation IS300h, or indeed an RC F. The dash and general layout is pretty much lifted straight out of the IS which is no bad thing. The RC is essentially an IS coupe after all – think what the BMW 4 series is to the 3 series.

      With that in mind, you get the usual touch sensitive climate controls as found in the IS, and our F Sport model features the wonderful LFA inspired instrument cluster à la IS F Sport (shown above). The interior generally feels great with high quality materials featured everywhere except in the usual lower down parts of the cabin. If I were nitpicking a little the buttons below the CD slot on the stereo seem like a bit of a cheap afterthought, but it’s easily forgiven as you end up using the steering wheel controls most of the time anyway. There’s also a really classy frameless auto dimming rear view mirror which looks great.

      One thing definitely worth mentioning in this car is the seats – they’re absolutely fantastic. Lexus seems to have managed the impossible and struck the perfect balance between comfort support – something many manufacturers still seem to struggle with. All too often you get into a sports car or even a hot hatch that has great looking seats offering plenty of lateral support only to find the seats rock hard or uncomfortable on a long journey. I would go as far as to saying these are some of the best all round seats I’ve had the pleasure of sitting in from any vehicle, period. That’s a bold claim, yes, but I urge you to try them for yourselves and I’m sure you’d agree.
      The only other obvious changes from the IS are the larger and redesigned door cards which I think feel of higher quality than the IS thanks to their sculpted design and use of aluminium. The rear is of course a little different due to the car’s coupe form also. It’s worth noting that although the car does have four proper seats, space in the back is fairly tight. You can definitely get adults in the back but 6 foot does seem to be pretty much the limit both for rear passenger and driver. I’m 6 foot and my head was just about touching the roof lining in the back of the RC, and with the driving position set for a 6 foot driver I could (just about) get my legs in – any further back and my legs would have been crushed. A shorter driver would obviously generate a moderate amount of rear legroom though and all being said I’d probably find a short journey perfectly acceptable in the back of the RC, but wouldn’t fancy a long run in the back. The electric seat mechanism was also quite nice in the way that it allowed rear passengers to get in and out, although of course this could seem quite slow in the rain!


      Boot space is fairly decent for a coupe and gives plenty of room for your weekly shop or everything you’d need for a weekend away. The rear seats also fold just like the 3rd generation IS giving a nice bit of extra flexibility too. I’m led to believe the RC2 00t gives a little more boot space thanks to its lack of battery pack also.
      Equipment
      The RC 300h starts at £34,995 in luxury trim, with F Sport and Premier versions also available. All versions are well equipped in general – sat nav is only standard on the premier version but is available as an option on all grades.
      Our F Sport test model came in at £40,565 as tested with the £1,995 premium navigation option and £450 protection pack – still pretty good value in my opinion for what you get. The premium navigation option is (although expensive) definitely an option box you should tick. As well as making the car easier to move on come resale time, it adds the better of the two navigation systems, an upgraded 10 speaker audio system, reverse camera with guidelines and DAB/DVD playback. The 10 speaker audio system sounds great and is a worthy upgrade from standard, if not quite as good as the optional 17 speaker Mark Levinson system. You’d have to listen to them to determine if it’s worth you spending out the extra £1000 for the Mark Levinson system, or failing that just go for the Premier version which includes it as standard anyway.

      That being said, I still think the F Sport is the pick of the range when it comes to the RC 300h, as the extra sporty touches really suit the car’s looks. If it were my money I’d definitely go for an F Sport with the option boxes ticked which is unusual as if you asked me about any other model in the Lexus range I’d usually go premier every time.
      Premier and F Sport models both feature electric heated and ventilated leather seats with drivers side memory as standard, while the Luxury model makes do with only heated seats and no memory. The memory function also covers the electrically adjustable steering wheel and outside mirrors too which is really nice, particularly if your partner also drives the car regularly.

      Dual zone climate control, keyless entry and start, LED headlights and cruise control all feature as standard across the range, with even the entry Luxury model being reasonably well appointed as tends to be the Lexus way. I’d still recommend going for the F Sport model over the luxury all day long though, and the £2,500 difference seems well worth it for the extra kit and enhanced looks that come with the F Sport styling package.
      Ride and Handling
      The RC 300h is a very refined car to drive, thanks in part to its hybrid power train. If you’ve driven other Lexus hybrids, the system will be vary familiar – allowing you to propel the car up to around 30mph in electric only mode, albeit if you don’t require even moderately fast acceleration. The system will also allow you to cruise steadily at higher speeds using electric only mode if you’re gentle with the throttle. Thanks to the hybrid system, cruising around town is often beautifully quiet, and even when the 2.5 litre petrol motor cuts in, it’s a seamless transition.

      Personally, I felt the car’s ride was a little more comfortable than the equivalent IS. The platform for the car is actually a bit of a “Frankenstein” of other Lexus models, with the front end from the current generation GS, the mid section from the 2nd gen IS convertible and rear section from the current gen IS. It sounds strange but it works well with the GS derived front end soaking up imperfections in the road nicely – especially when you consider this is the F Sport model on 19 inch wheels. I never once felt that the car was crashing over bumps or potholes and the car’s ride together with the ever so comfy seats I mentioned earlier make for a great long distance companion.
      In terms of handling, I’d start by saying that you should think of this car more as a comfy GT cruiser rather than an out and out sports car and then you’d be thinking along the right lines, especially in hybrid guise. The car does handle well – the electrically assisted power steering has a nice weight to it, although it is lacking a little in feedback. There’s little body roll which is impressive because the RC is quite a heavy lump and the traction/stability control does a good job of keeping everything in check. The Sport + mode on the F sport model does rein in the traction control a little as well as sharpening up throttle response and tweaking the adaptive variable dampers too, which definitely allows for a little more fun.

      Ultimately it’s not a car that feels as if you need to push it hard to get the most out of it. It feels like it’s at its best cruising along at a relaxed pace, whilst still giving you the confidence to have a little fun with it on the occasion that you feel like popping it into sport + mode.
      Performance
      The hybrid set-up in the RC 300h is the same as the one in the IS 300h so if you’ve ever driven one of those you should pretty much know what to expect. Just like its IS counterpart the RC 300h produces 220 hp from a combination of the 2.5 litre 4 cylinder petrol engine and its electric motor.

      Straight line performance can be a little deceptive as the official figures quote a 0-62mph time of 8.6 seconds, 3 tenths down on the IS300h (presumably due to the RC 300h weighing almost 1800kg) but Lexus are well known underestimate performance figures. Indeed, the RC 300h feels quicker than the figures would suggest, with the surge of initial acceleration feeling quite strong thanks to the extra torque from the electric motor.
      At higher speeds, you may notice that the motor has to be worked quite hard to make swift progress, and the CVT gearbox that is featured across the Lexus hybrid range doesn’t necessarily lend itself to performance driving. You do of course have the option of using the steering wheel mounted paddles but these only create artificial gear changes by restricting the revs due to the fact it is a CVT gear box. Still, for an occasional bit of driving fun they do the job and when combined with the ASC (active sound control) and the LFA inspired instrument panel, the car can make you feel as if you are driving in a video game – in a good way.
      The active sound control is worth mentioning and also features on the IS 300h range. This time it’s only on the F Sport RC 300h I believe. Basically, it generates artificial sound and plays it through the speakers to make the car sound more muscular. It sound a little cheesy yes, but many manufacturers are doing the same these days due to downsizing engines for emissions reasons, and in this case it works quite well. The sound the car makes in sport/sport + mode is fantastic and really gives the impressions that you’ve got something potent under the bonnet. It even occasionally seems to “pop” on lift off and manual gear changes which is cool. Sure, you know deep down it isn’t real (there is a switch to turn it off if it really offends you) and the sound outside the car is completely different, but if you pick up an unsuspecting passenger, there’s no denying it at least sounds impressive and they’d probably never know!
      Overall, I’d say the performance of this car is good, given the hybrid system and economy that you’re likely to be able to achieve with it. For the type of car that the RC is, it does feel like it could do with a little more power in certain higher speed situations, so it would be interesting to try the slightly quicker RC 200t back to back with it to find out if the extra performance is worth sacrificing a little of the hybrid’s refinement and running costs for. That’s ultimately the choice you’ll have to make if you buy one and it’s really going to be down to personal preference. I don’t think you’d be disappointed with the performance of the RC 300h, as you’re buying into the hybrid system too and the benefits that brings. It would definitely be interesting if Lexus decided to make an RC 450h with the larger petrol engine, but I sense that’s unlikely to happen. Incidentally Lexus do offer an RC 350 for the US and certain other markets which is still a quick car in its own right and could be a genuine “sensible” alternative to the RC F – if only Lexus would bring it to the UK.

      Running Costs
      Being a hybrid you should expect running costs to be pretty reasonable and the RC 300h delivers on this. CO2 emissions of 116 g/km mean VED of just £20 per year in the current system, though it’s worth bearing in mind that when the new tax system comes into play in April 2017, this will not be the case.
      Lexus also quotes a combined MPG of of 56.5 for the RC 300h F Sport. In my hands I found this to be a little way off as is usually the case. My test route consisted of some motorway, some town and some spirited driving and I saw the Average MPG vary from high 30’s to low 40’s. From past experience with Lexus hybrids and with a bit more effort put into maintaining electric mode for the most time possible (and a few more miles on the engine), I have no doubt that at least high 40’s would be possible. From my point of view I find the fuel consumption is very reasonable considering the nice balance of performance and running costs on offer from this car. Yes, there are some equivalent diesels out there will deliver slightly better MPG, but I’m not generally a diesel fan anyway and would take a hybrid over a diesel any day for the increased refinement and lack of potential DPF problems, but ultimately that’s a choice buyers have to make. As is obvious from the recent VW emissions scandal and episodes of bad smog in cities like Paris, it appears public opinion could slowly be turning against diesels anyway, and hybrids like this provide a real credible alternative.
      Conclusion
      The RC 300h is likely to be the biggest seller in Lexus RC range, and with good reason – it probably makes the most overall sense for most buyers. The car’s hybrid drivetrain provides an excellent all round balance of performance, refinement and running costs, and the build quality and interior are excellent. Combine that with the Lexus reputation for reliability and customer service and you’ve got a pretty compelling package, especially if you’re looking for a well equipped luxury coupe that’s a real head turner.

      A special thanks to the lovely people at Snows Lexus Hedge End for the loan of our RC 300h F Sport featured in this review.

    • By Lexus Owners Club

      Introduction & Styling
      The new Lexus RX is a big deal for Lexus – after all the RX model range is the company’s biggest seller globally, so the company has pulled out all the stops to ensure this new model is a success.
      While there was nothing visually wrong with the previous model, the car’s styling was clearly starting to look a little dated compared to the rest of the Lexus range, and as Lexus has been trying to change its image over the last few years, it was clearly time the ever popular RX received some attention.

      At first glance, the car’s new much more aggressive styling looks great. It’s clear that inspiration has been taken from the car’s smaller sibling – the NX, and that’s not a bad thing. The sharp lines and creases give the car a very unique, even slightly futuristic look that’s sure to stand out in a school car park full of drab diesel SUVs.
      The car’s LED headlights and tail lights finish off the look nicely with L shaped pulsing front and rear indicators that look really smart – a nice touch.


      Interior
      Step inside the car and the premium feel continues. The car feels like a genuine leap in quality from the previous model and even other models in the Lexus range. Everywhere you look there are swathes of beautifully stitched leather and high end materials. Everything has a nice solid feel to it and the cabin simply oozes class.
      The analogue clock is distinctly Lexus, while the centre piece of the cabin has to be the incredibly large navigation /multimedia display in the centre of the dashboard. It’s incredibly bright, clear and a pleasure to use, and you’ll struggle to find a car with a larger multimedia screen this side of a Tesla Model S. At least the display on the RX won’t suffer with fingerprint smudges like the Tesla either as it’s not a touch screen, with control being tasked to the now familiar if slightly fiddly to operate Lexus mouse. On the subject of the Lexus mouse, it appears Lexus have not yet made their minds up as to the best way to control their navigation systems, with both the mouse and a touch pad still featuring across different models, not to forget the rotary controller on lesser navigation units – make your mind up Lexus!

      The seats in this car are worth a mention too. The last generation RX450h was heaped in praise for its wonderfully comfortable seats and existing owners will be pleased to hear the new model doesn’t disappoint. There’s plenty of support and the supple, soft leather seat facings feel like a lovely place to be on a long journey. Getting your seating position is easy too thanks to the electrically adjustable seats that offer even the fussiest driver a plenty of choice.
      Rear legroom and boot space is easily on par with others in the class, if not class leading. It’s a big car and it will take 5 adults and plenty of luggage with ease. Rear legroom is good and the boot has a nice flat and wide load area that offer 453 litres with the rear seats in place and 924 litres with the seats down – ample for all but the largest loads.

      Equipment
      The new Lexus RX450h range starts at £46,995 for the SE model, but our range topping Premier model came in at a staggering £58,640 as tested, but as you would expect – it includes an obscenely long list of kit.
      The car covers all the basics and more. The neat Qi wireless phone charger first seen in the Lexus NX returns here but this time sits under the dash at the front of centre console, rather than the tray inside the armrest like the NX. This means it can even accommodate larger devices such as my laughably large Nexus 6 so top marks here.

      The Lexus RX450h Premier’s climate control also now even incorporates the heated and air cooled seats. This means that you no longer need to touch the controls for these and can simply leave them in an auto setting. Thee climate control system can then automatically detect seat temperature and heat up/cool down the seat as necessary in line with cabin temperature – pretty cool stuff. There’s also a heated steering wheel as standard in the Premier version although I was surprised not to see heated rear seats in a Lexus at this price – I’m sure I saw them in the pre production version but never mind – the kids will have to go cold. First world problems hey?! Still, at least they can enjoy the factory fitted rear screens and wireless headphones in this top of the range Premier model – that should keep them quiet for a bit.

      The radar cruise control is fantastic as ever, and even slows the vehicle to a complete stop in traffic. It actually worked really well in crawling traffic, allowing you to simply steer without having to worry about the peddles. A quick flick of the “resume” function on the cruise control stalk will also see the car pull away again after stopping which is handy. Tesla Autopilot it most certainly is not, but mighty useful in traffic/motorway driving all the same.
      Another favourite gadget of mine on the car is the head up display – it’s really nice and just as useful as you’d imagine. While other manufacturers offer a head up display as an option, I’ve always found the ones fitted to the latest Lexus vehicles to be the best in the business. For example, I recently drove the latest Jaguar XF with head up display, and while the display functioned just fine, it used a rather dated looking orange/green colour scheme reminiscent of something from the 80s like the digital dash the Knight Rider car “Kitt”. The Lexus head up display on the other hand has a far more modern look and displays much more useful information around the sat nav and radar cruise control among other things. Clever stuff.

      Ride & Handling
      As you might expect, the RX450h’s hybrid drive train provides an incredibly refined driving experience. Just like other hybrid models in the Lexus range, the ability to start the car up in complete silence and (gently) progress in electric only mode for the first few miles is great, and surprisingly still startles a few pedestrians in car parks even in 2016.
      It’s a big car and it’s clearly set up for comfort rather than a particularly sport drive, but that seems a good thing for most potential owners of this car. That’s not to say the big Lexus can’t handle itself – the steering is nice and precise for example but as you may expect the car does have a tenancy to feel a little soft if you decide to feed it through a twisty bit of road.

      Despite the size of the car, its dimensions never really make the car feel cumbersome whilst out on the road, and parking is of course taken care of by the fantastic selection of parking aids which make parking the big Lexus surprisingly easy. As well as the now fairly common reverse camera and sensors, there are also other cameras around the car and a rather useful top down view that make parallel parking a breeze.
      Performance
      The new Lexus RX450h features a 3.5 litre V6 engine as before, this time producing a maximum combined output of 308 bhp. The engine produces 335 NM of torque, with a further 335 NM of torque available from the front electric motor, and 139 NM of torque from the rear electric motor. The clever system is able to haul the Lexus from 0 – 60 mph in just 7.7 seconds too – not bad for a vehicle that weight more than 2.7 tonnes, and even at speed, the car always feels like it has plenty in reserve.

      Some people have criticised hybrids in the past for the CVT gearbox causing the engine to sound strained under load but I’m pleased to report that this is not the case here. The 3.5 V6 petrol engine is clearly a big enough brute to manage quite nicely on its own, and I’d go as far as saying that the engine actually has quite a nice tone when you put your foot down, should you feel the need.
      To be honest, the car never really makes you feel like you need hurry it along though, it definitely feels at home just wafting you and your passengers along in comfort, which is surely one of the main objectives when purchasing a car such as this.
      Running Costs
      Lexus claims a combined fuel economy rating of 54.3 MPG which on paper sounds fantastic for an 2.7 tonne all wheel drive SUV packing a 3.5 litre V6 petrol engine. In reality, I didn’t find the car delivered anywhere near that kind of fuel economy, returning a mere 31.4 MPG across the mixed roads of our test, which combined motorway, town and rural driving. Of course, I wasn’t expecting to equal the official claims, but was hoping the car might manage high 30’s or even 40 mpg. I’m sure there’s a good chance that once the car loosens up a bit, and with deliberately more frugal driving that this figure will rise a little. In theory it will likely end up delivering similar MPG to diesel engined rivals, which you could argue is good enough to encourage buyers of those models into a hybrid. Personally, the hybrid’s relaxed and refined driving style would be a big selling point to me and if it could deliver the same MPG as an equivalent diesel then why would you bother with a diesel at all?

      CO2 emissions see the RX450h Premier currently taxed at £100 per year until the March 2017 rates change. It also has a 20 percent benefit in kind charge for company car drivers – significantly less than that of some diesel powered rivals. The new Lexus RX450h can in fact emit as little as 120 g/km in base trim with smaller wheels, meaning that it currently creeps into the £20 a year VED category and 19 percent benefit in kind charge – truly outstanding for a powerful SUV of this size. This is surely an area that could see Lexus stealing sales from the competition.
      While the RX450h Premier does come with a huge amount of kit, it does come with a sizeable price tage of £57,995 which does seem quite pricey especially when compared to some rivals. The range as a whole does start from £46,995 though so it really depends if you want all that kit, and let’s face it – you probably do.

      Conclusion
      The new Lexus RX450h ticks a lot of boxes. It’s a comfortable, gadget laden family vehicle that will waft you and your passengers around in a beautifully put together luxury environment. It has seemingly endless amounts of kit, particularly on the higher specification models and competitive if not class leading economy for a vehicle of this size. If you’re a Lexus or hybrid fan in the first place then there’s no doubt that this is the SUV for you.

      A special thanks to the lovely people at Snows Lexus Hedge End for the loan of our RX450h Premier featured in this review.

    • By Steve
      The new breathtaking flagship coupé from Lexus tested and reviewed.
      Read our Lexus LC500 review and prepare to want one :D
      If you not logged in then log in/register to the club to leave your love letter comments ;) :D

      http://ownersclub.co/LexusLC500review
      Please comment on the review as this post is locked.
    • By Lexus Owners Club

      LEXUS LATEST OFFERING IN THE 2.0 LITRE SUV MARKET   
      The fourth generation model equipped with 2.0 litre petrol engine offering flexibility and agile handling while delivering luxury comfort levels. Being offered with either a two-wheel drive or four-wheel drive option, and for those who want more of an exhilarating drive, then there is also an F Sport version.
      ENGINE/DRIVETRAIN
      The RX 200t is powered by a brand new 2.0-litre petrol engine (developing 238 hp) offering turbocharged performance while delivering improved fuel economy and lower emissions by using advanced D-4ST valve technology and Atkinson Cycle capability.
      Drivetrain options are available as either all-wheel drive or two-wheel drive, and a ‘paddle shift’ option to provide smooth control of the 6-speed automatic transmission. The all-wheel drive system delivers drive from full front-wheel drive to 50/50 front to rear split, depending on driving and road conditions.

      All models are equipped with Drive Mode Select with options of Eco, Normal or Sport, allowing you to select the mode to best suit your driving style. F Sport and Premier models have the option of Sport S+ which adapts the vehicles’ suspension settings to provide an enhanced cornering experience to match the drivetrain performance.

      EXTERIOR

      The latest generation RX exterior enhancements include a larger Lexus signature spindle grille with ‘L-mesh’ inserts, brake cooling ducts and aerodynamic fins for increased downforce.


      TRIPLE LED HEADLIGHTS
      Futuristic ‘L’-shaped headlights use the same LED light source for both high and low beam. For a unique style, they are complemented by Daytime Running Lights with integrated sequential indicators.

      LED REAR LIGHTS
      Stylish ‘L’-shaped LEDs create linear illumination from the rear corners of the RX to the centre of the tailgate. The extra-wide rear lights offer sharp visibility and have eye-catching sequential LED indicators.

      ALLOY WHEELS
      Available with 18” or 20” alloy wheels, with the option to provide an individual touch to the Premier grade 20” wheels by customising with coloured inserts, depending on the paintwork you choose.
       
      PANORAMIC ROOF
      The large optional factory-fitted panoramic roof provides extra headroom and allows natural light to enter the RX interior. It is also fitted with a movable glass section at the front to heighten the sense of open-air feeling, and an electrically adjustable sliding blind should the sun become too intense.

      INTERIOR
      Once seated inside the RX 200t, it is instantly apparent that the overall quality is carried over from the exterior to the interior. An example of this is the leather seats which are hand-stitched by a team of seventeen Lexus ‘Takumi’ craftsmen to provide a truly bespoke interior. The drivers’ seat has multiple adjustable for height, angle and lumbar support and is equipped with a memory function. The passenger seat is also electrically adjustable with the front seats having both heating and cooling for occupant comfort and convenience.


      The centre console is laser etched by Yamaha Piano division, creating an intriguing lined pattern, before being hand polished to create a beautiful sheen and set in a comfortable, accessible format with all controls within easy reach of the driver.

      A large Multimedia display panel provides all of the required functions to entertain, communicate, set comfort levels and provide vehicle data for the driver and passengers. Controlled by either a mouse within the centre console, through the steering wheel or by voice command, the various functions can be selected whilst minimising driver distraction.


      Wireless mobile phone charging is conveniently provided via a built-in charging plate located towards the front part of the console.
      The model used for this review is equipped with a 3-spoke leather steering wheel, featuring finger rests and a broad padded rim optimised for comfort. Integrated switches control audio, telephone, multi-information display, Adaptive Cruise Control and Lane Keeping Assist. Equipped with electrically adjustable tilt and telescopic wheel function in addition to the drivers’ seat being moved back to aid ease of access when entering and exiting the vehicle.


      LOAD SPACE
      The load area is extremely spacious and is easily accessed via powered tailgate opening from the key fob.

      The rear seats fold in a 40:20:40 split to allow even more space for transporting larger items, while the centre section opens to allow for longer items.
      SAFETY
      All new Lexus RX models are now equipped with the Lexus Safety System + as standard equipment. This includes a Pre-Crash System with pedestrian detection, Lane Keeping Assist to help you stay on course, Automatic High Beam for enhanced vision at night, and Adaptive Cruise Control, which regulates your speed to that of the vehicle in front.
      ROAD TEST SUMMARY
      Overall, the RX 200t performed well in all situations such as urban and motorway driving, on-road and off-road terrain and varying weather conditions. The turbocharged engine performance is sufficient to propel the RX to the desired speed with little effort and is matched perfectly with the efficient six-speed automatic transmission. The Mode selection switch was used frequently and performed well with noticeable differences in the vehicle dynamic when the varying modes were changed. The default setting is quite sensibly switched to Eco but soon changes once the drive becomes a little more enthusiastic.
      The ride height and general visibility from the drivers’ seat further enhance your sense of security in the knowledge that you are in quite a substantial vehicle with numerous safety features, including ten Airbags and active front seat headrests. Driving safety and convenience features within the RX were used throughout the road test such as the Lane Keeping Assist, Adaptive Cruise Control with Radar and traffic sign recognition.
      The large, central mounted multimedia display provides plenty of options for the driver and passengers with good visibility and minimal glare in all lighting conditions. The Navigation system proved to be reliable, with up to date traffic information now being essential in any cross-town commute.
      Overall quality and comfort of the RX becomes apparent over longer driving distances and with passenger convenience features such as the air-cooled front seats alleviating the usual discomfort levels in warm weather conditions. The climate control is extremely effective, keeping the interior temperature levels constant and comfortable. Minimal external noise was encountered, even with the sunroof or drivers’ window open, resulting in a quiet interior, until the audio system is powered up. Although not equipped with the Mark Levinson Premium Surround system option, the audio output was still of very high quality with clear, definitive sound. Several sources of audio were selectable, such as DAB and Bluetooth connection to phone or tablet.
      So how does it compare to other SUV’s? There is a vast range to choose from in the current market but because it is a Lexus and has the brand reputation and support network, it has to be somewhere near the top of the list. Being equipped with a high level of comfort and equipment, and at a reasonable price, it certainly has to be one to seriously consider.
      TECHNICAL INFORMATION
      ENGINE:  2.0 PETROL TURBO
      TRANSMISSION:  6 SPEED AUTOMATIC
      POWER HP: (KW)  238/175
      TORQUE (NM):  350
      CO2 EMISSIONS(G/KM): 181 COMBINED
      MPG(URBAN): 28
      MPG(EXTRA URBAN): 40.4
      MPG(COMBINED): 34.9
      MAX SPEED (MPH): 124
      0-62 MPH (SECS): 9.2
      COSTS & SPECIFICATIONS (effective from September 2016)
      RX 200T S 
      Lexus Safety System Plus (ACC/PCS, LDA, LKA, TSR)Heated fabric seats: 8 way driver & 8 way passenger adjustable inc lumbar support, 8″ Multi-information display in centre instrument panel, 9 Speaker/1CD, Lexus Media Display , DAB, Rotary, Remote Touch Controller, 18″ alloy wheels 5-spoke: tyre size 235/60 R18 103V, L-shaped LED headlights with AHB FROM £39,995.00 
      RX 200T LUXURY
       
      Leather heated and ventilated seats (front)Front and rear armrest with 2 cup holders and storage, 12.3″ Multi-information display in centre instrument panel, Wireless smartphone charger, 20″ alloy wheels, L-shaped LED headlights with AHB, LED front & rear sequential turn lamps/indicators & DRL, Side mirrors; electrically adjustable, heated, auto folding, electro chromatic (auto-dimming) with memory, Roof Rail FROM £45,995.00
       
      RX 200T F SPORT 
      AVS (Adaptive Variable Suspension)Rear door sun shades, F SPORT interior styling (unique front seats, black headlining), LED Low Speed,  Front Cornering Lights, F SPORT exterior styling (unique front bumper & black mirror covers) FROM £48,995.00 
      All prices are based on Dealer ‘On the Road’ price, including 20% VAT
      ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

      A special thanks to Snows Lexus Hedge End for the loan of our RX 200t featured in this review

      For more information about the Lexus RX 200t, click the following link: http://www.hedgeend.lexus.co.uk/mirror/model/rx/?h=offers
      VIDEO
       
    • By Lexus Owners Club

      Introduction & Styling
      The first thing that strikes you about the Lexus IS300h F Sport is the way it looks. It’s definitely a car that is capable of attracting attention – particularly in the right colour. Our Celestial Black test car looked simply stunning when it caught a (rare) glimpse of the sun during our time with it. You can tell Lexus has worked hard on the styling of the car to avoid it blending in with the usual drab grey mass of German saloons you find in a typical company car park.
      The F sport model in particular with its large trademark spindle grill and aggressive alloy wheels really stands out against the competition. It’s easy to say that this is the best looking model in the Lexus IS range, and in fact everyone that saw the car during my time with it was a fan of the way it looked. So far, so good for the F Sport then.

      Interior
      Step inside and the first things that you notice in the interior of this car are the seats. Our car was fitted the optional Dark Rose leather F Sport seats at a cost of £2,000, and in my opinion they look excellent and provide a nice contrast to the dark exterior. It’s worth noting that the seats are also electrically adjustable, with driver’s side memory, and they’re also heated and ventilated. Slip into the sumptuous leather driver’s seat and you’ll find just the right blend of comfort and support too. The seats are a little firmer than what you used to find in the old second generation Lexus IS, but they also provide considerably more lateral support.
      Away from the seats themselves, the interior is genuinely a nice place to be. Everything has a real sense of quality engineering to it in true Lexus style, and there’s a nice weight to the doors as they shut with a nice thud just like you would hope for. Admittedly, there are a few cheaper plastics if you really hunt for them towards the bottom of the doors and the dashboard, but every part of the car that you regularly come into contact with is pleasing to the touch. It’s now nice to see a quality analogue clock in the centre of the dashboard too, as the old digital clock in the 2nd generation IS was a little too 90’s Japanese for my liking. The climate control is also worth mentioning with its unique touch sensitive sliders to control the temperature. Some might call it a bit gimmicky but I think it’s a nice touch. If I were to moan a little bit I’d say the cup holders are in a slightly awkward place, especially if you have a passenger as they are effectively the passenger arm rest. Being an F Sport this car had the dark roof lining which I thought provided a lovely contrast against the dark red leather seats, although this may not be to everyone’s taste.

      The new car is larger inside than the old model, finally providing a much more reasonable amount of rear leg room. It’s not a limo by any means but it’s fairly decent now for its class. You can quite happily take four adults in comfort now but you’d still struggle with five thanks to the large transmission tunnel through the middle seat that comes as part of the rear wheel drive chassis. Most driving purists would probably agree that this is a worthwhile sacrifice though. The boot is also slightly bigger than before, which shows how the company’s hybrid technology has improved since the rather small boot on the first Lexus GS450h model. A real bonus in this model is that despite its saloon form factor, Lexus has thoughtfully included split folding rear seats making it much more practical than its ski hatch equipped predecessor. The ability to take larger loads on occasion is of course very welcome.
      Equipment
      Along with the Dark Rose leather F Sport seats, our test car had been specified to almost the level of an IS300h Premier. The other options it was fitted with included the wonderful Mark Levinson premium sound system with 15 speakers, plus the Lexus Premium Navigation, metallic paint and the protection pack. This little haul of goodies takes the price up to a staggering £40,425, up from a base price of £32,495. If you fancy yourself as a bit of an audiophile, the Mark Levinson sound system is an absolute must as it simply blows away the standard 6 or premium 8 speaker set up, so long as you dial in the right settings. Do bear in mind though that although this car is fitted with a few rather nice extras, being a Lexus it does come with a whole stash of goodies as standard too, so you’re certainly not left wanting for kit, even without the options.

      If you decide do go for the Premium Nav then you get the Lexus “Remote Touch” interface with the joystick to control the infotainment screen. The joystick is definitely something that’s worth trying out on a test drive as while it works quite well for most functions, it can be a little fiddly when for example entering a post code or searching for a point of interest. Best to give it a try and see how you get on with it really. There is also the standard sat nav option available that gives you a much more traditional rotary controller akin to solutions provided by other manufacturers.
      As you go to set off and plug your seatbelt in, the driver’s seat slides in and the steering wheel extends out to meet you – a really nice touch and something that in reverse of course is designed to make it easier to get in and out of the car. The only thing I would say though, is that if you’re six foot plus and carrying a rear passenger, make sure you let the rear passenger out first before unplugging your seat belt. You’ll get what I mean if you try it!

      With that eerie silence you’ll already know and love if you’re used to driving hybrids the car is ready to go, and it’s nice to be greeted with the LFA inspired instrument cluster from the company’s famous and rare as hens teeth supercar. This particular feature is exclusive to F Sport models and I must say it’s one of my favourite features. To be honest, if you’re into your gadgets then it’s almost worth going for the F Sport just for this. This digital (and motorised) instrument panel is simply a work of art and features many different and lovely graphics that change depending on what driving mode you have the car in. Even simple things like changing the sensitivity of the automatic wipers often presents you with a nice little animation on the screen and it’s little touches like this that really make you think about the attention to detail that’s gone into this car.

      Handling
      On the move and the first thing that becomes apparent is what a great chassis this is. The current generation Lexus IS is still based on the on the same platform as its predecessor, although it has been substantially reworked and you really can tell. This particular model being the F Sport with its sport suspension set up is of course firmer than the rest of the range but I have previously had a chance to drive a Premier model and even the difference with that from the 2nd Generation model is notable. There’s far less body roll and the steering feels more direct. The car also feels more planted at higher speeds and the steering requires less correction when keeping lane on a motorway. Lexus have also done a great job in disguising the extra mass of the battery packs which now sit in a better position than some previous hybrid models to help with the car’s centre of gravity without compromising on boot space.
      Considering its sport suspension, I was pleasantly surprised at the F Sport suspension set up. It’s easy to arrive with the misconception that Lexus had taken a page from the same manual as Audi and BMW with their S Line and M Sport trim levels respectively. Their approach all too often sacrifices ride quality and comfort for the sake of looks, leaving a crashy and uncomfortable ride on British roads. However, I’m pleased to report that this is not the case with the F Sport. Yes it is firmer over bumps as you would expect but it’s certainly not crashy. There’s a certain suppleness to the suspension travel that ensures that car does not move away from the Lexus ethos, yet it still remains perfectly composed and controlled through the twisty bits when you need it to perform. Honestly some may disagree, but I think Audi and BMW could learn a thing or two from how Lexus have set this car up, particularly for the UK anyway. After all, most of us don’t tackle Nordschleife as part of our daily commute do we?

      Performance
      When it comes to outright performance, on paper at least the car is there or there abouts on a par with the old IS250 model and in real life it feels it. You’d be hard pushed to tell the difference aside from lower top speed should you encounter a suitable stretch of Autobahn. Of course, the way the two cars deliver their performance is completely different thanks to the massive difference in engine and gearbox technology. The old IS250 with its petrol V6 engine and conventional 6 speed automatic transmission is a far cry from the hybrid and CVT set up in the IS300h. While the petrol engine is still a 2.5 litre it has lost two cylinders and now runs on the Atkinson cycle. The combined power output of the two motors comes in at 223bhp, up from 204bhp in the IS250. Despite this, and probably due to the extra weight from the hybrid set up, 0-62 mph is down three tenths on the old car to 8.4 seconds, though as I mentioned this is not all that noticeable in the real world. Plus, if 0-62 mph times are of chief concern to you then you’ll probably want to look elsewhere anyway, or maybe at the new IS200t that manages the same sprint in 7 seconds flat.
      There has been mixed reports on the use of the CVT gearbox in Toyota and Lexus hybrid models over the last few years so it was interesting to see how the gearbox suited the F Sport model in particular. Can a car with a CVT gearbox really be sporty? The CVT haters out there would tell you no and constantly make references to the DAF 600 of the late 50’s, but I’m pleased to report that as any sensible person would expect, things have moved on a long way since the days of the DAF 600. Indeed, under normal driving conditions, I would actually go so far as saying that the CVT gearbox in the IS300h presents a smoother and more relaxed drive than even the most silky smooth conventional automatic. This of course is due to the lack of gear changes.  It’s only when you push on harder that you’ll notice the slightly slow throttle response. Sport mode does counteract this somewhat but it’s still by no means instant. Ninety percent of the time you won’t notice it but try it out for yourself and you’ll see what I mean.
      Lexus are now offering you the chance to book a 24 hour test drive in the Lexus IS, CT, or NX – click here for more details.

      Lexus have also done their best to counteract some of the complaints regarding strange engine noise in earlier hybrid models equipped with the CVT gearbox. This is not so bad in the IS300h model anyway thanks to its slightly larger capacity engine and improved sound deadening. To counteract this further still, Lexus have employed something called ASC or Active Sound Control. It’s a similar system to one that has been used in quite a few cars before – often due to newer models losing cylinders for a decrease in CO2 emissions. Basically, the system works by pumping a more “sporty” artificial engine sound through the car’s speakers to give the driver a greater sense of occasion when pushing the car harder. This is particularly prevalent when selecting sport mode on the rotary controller and even more so when manual gear change is in use. I actually quite liked it when driving the car more enthusiastically. Having said that, it may be something you want to turn off when on a long motorway trip as in certain modes it actually creates a kind of synthetic exhaust drone. It’s nice to have the option to turn it on and off though and it’s sure to be a case of personal preference.
      Manual mode on the gearbox can either make use of the steering wheel mounted paddles or the gear lever when shifted across into sport. It would have been nice if the paddles were metal rather than plastic (a la RCF), but never the less they feel good to use. Speaking of manual mode, I was curious as to how this was going to work when the CVT really doesn’t have individual gears. It turns out that it effectively creates six artificial “gears” by changing the revs and also the noise (presumably using the ASC). It works well enough although there’s not really any point to it in my opinion, other than for a bit of fun. You can actually use the down changes for engine braking though should you so desire. The ASC also appeared to add in the occasional “pop” sound on the gear change while using manual mode which was interesting.

      Running Costs
      Running costs are clearly an important factor when it comes to this car and its hybrid drive train. If it wasn’t an important factor then you’d probably be looking at the IS200t right? Well, Lexus claim the IS300h can achieve 61.4 mpg on the combined cycle. Of course, as with all manufacturer figures these were achieved under laboratory conditions so we’re not actually expecting to achieve these figures in real life. We tested the car in mixed used conditions with motorway use as well as town driving in the same journey, achieving an average of 47.6 mpg. It’s somewhat shy of the official figures yes, but this car did only have a few hundred miles on the clock so hopefully the petrol engine will loosen up a bit a time goes on. Also, if you consider that this car still has a 2.5 litre petrol engine under the bonnet then knocking on the door of 50 mpg is pretty good going. I can’t see why 50 + mpg wouldn’t be attainable once the car has loosened up a bit with some careful driving. With a full tank on board the car was suggesting a 600 mile plus range was attainable from its 66 litre tank. I didn’t get a chance to confirm this but that’s on a par with many diesels if achievable. The car also emits just 107 g/km of CO2 putting it currently in the £10 per year VED band. Again this is incredibly cheap considering the car and engine size plus the reasonably good performance on offer. If the cheap tax interests you (and why wouldn’t it) I’d advise getting your order in soon before the tax system changes in 2017, when the CO2 emissions will no longer offer any benefit on a year by year basis.
      Conclusion
      If you’re looking for a compact executive saloon that’s enjoyable and comfortable to drive whilst maintaining excellent fuel economy then the Lexus IS300h could be for you, especially if you’re already a fan of the brand. Lexus continues to build a very loyal following, largely helped by its reputation for build quality, reliability and customer service, and the IS300h certainly stays true to the Lexus brand in my opinion. If you’re considering a compact executive then the Lexus IS300h is well worth a test drive and it makes a tempting proposition for those looking to stand out from the crowd.
      View 50+ more photos in our Lexus IS300h F Sport Gallery

       
      Lexus Hedge End
      A special thanks to the lovely people at Snows Lexus Hedge End for the loan of our IS300h F Sport featured in this review.