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    • By SeanIS300h
      IS300h 2014
      Hi all,
      Just got car back from service and immediately noticed that it is veering to the left.
      I had it back to garage to check.
      Received the car back and it was still veering to the left.
      Contacted them again and I was told that the alignment is set as per manufacturers specifications and that the car is exactly how it should be.
      Car was perfect prior to service, lovely drive and now I constantly have to correct the steering and can feel the steering wheel wants to rotate anti clockwise. 
      General service was done, differential oil changed, no reason to take off wheels as brakes were good.
      Car passed its NCT(MOT) a week before it got serviced and all was good.
      Any help is much appreciated.
       
    • By SeanIS300h
      IS300h 2014
      Hi all,
      Just got car back from service and immediately noticed that it is veering to the left.
      I had it back to garage to check.
      Received the car back and it was still veering to the left.
      Contacted them again and I was told that the alignment is set as per manufacturers specifications and that the car is exactly how it should be.
      Car was perfect prior to service, lovely drive and now I constantly have to correct the steering and can feel the steering wheel wants to rotate anti clockwise.
      General service was done, differential oil changed, no reason to take off wheels as brakes were good.
      Car passed its NCT(MOT) a week before it got serviced and all was good.
      Any help is much appreciated.
       
    • By Thackeray
      For a long time I’ve been puzzled by the Which? magazine review of the IS 300h. In their initial report they made it a Best Buy but a few months later downgraded it. Its website version of the review currently says: “Best Buy award removed. It's a very good car, but we found the Lexus IS emits so much CO (carbon monoxide) in our tests, that it would fail to meet any EU emissions limits set this century. As such, we cannot possibly recommend it.”
      Despite this negative review, there were lots of things I liked about the car, plus some ratings that sounded impressive:
      Best in class for 2013 NCAP safety World’s most efficient production petrol engine when launched, at 38.5%. (It was overtaken by a Honda six months later.) Routinely at top of reliability ratings. I was also doubtful about the Which? mpg figures. Their claim of 97 mpg around town was obviously nonsense and the motorway figure of 34 mpg looked doubtful too. They say their tests are performed in a laboratory but they don’t give enough detail to tell how they get to these extreme figures. I thought if the carbon monoxide figures are based on the same testing, they’re just as likely to be wrong. So I went ahead and bought an IS300h.
      I’ve searched in the past for some other independent CO test reports and couldn’t find any. Until today.
      But first, what is Which? claiming? They say it wouldn’t meet EU carbon monoxide emission limits set this century. I take this to mean Euro 4 in January 2005. (There was Euro 3 in January 2000 but that was the last year of last century.) The limit for petrol cars under Euro 4 is 1 gram per kilometre (g/km) of CO.  So they’re saying the IS300h emits more than 1 g/km.
      For a long time I had no way of knowing if that was true or not. But at last I’ve found a website that shows real-world emissions test results. It’s called EQUA Index and they test cars by driving them around real roads monitoring the emissions from the exhaust pipe on a three and a half hour run. They give the IS300h their top rating of A++. This represents a band from zero to 0.125 g/km of carbon monoxide. (Their result is for the 2017 model but I don’t think there are any significant differences to the engine from the 2013 model. Please correct me if I’m wrong.)
      By contrast, Which? says CO emissions are more than eight times this figure. 
      I know nothing about EQUA; I’ve only just come across it. But I’m more inclined to believe that real-world testing on roads will give a more accurate figure than a short test in a laboratory.
    • By Rashi
      Hi Guys,
      I have just joined the club as I am interested in buying IS300h luxury trim 64 plate with 125k miles on it. I like German cars and had BMW 320d and C220 Merc in last few years. Both I bought with 100k+ miles on the board and I never had any issue with them all the time I had them apart from regular services and tyres change. They proved to be economical as well.
      I have read a lot about other Lexus models with high mileage’s but I haven’t read anything about IS300H crossing 100+ and yet keeping inact which German diesels do quite often and quite decently.
      I am still confused as if I should go ahead with it or stick to old school - long lasting diesels?
      I have been following threads in here for quite a few days and found them very interesting and helping. I hope I would also be listened to :))
      Thanks 
    • By Shyamal IS300H-FSPORT
      Hi all, 
      I have recently bought a Lexus IS300h F port and I was told to get a tracker fitted by one of my colleages. I have bought the tracker that was suggested to me but I have no idea where or how to fit it. 
      The instruction manual says to attach it to a 12-36V charger (I'm assuming the 12V Battery in the boot). I have never done anything of this sort before so I just wanted to ask
      a) is it safe for me to try and fit the two leads myself?
      b) would me attaching a tracker to the 12V Battery drain it & cause problems??
      Hope to hear from someone soon.. 
      Shyamal 
       
      Ps: the picture below shows the two leads that I'm supposed to connect to the Battery if it makes sense to anyone