Dean8788

Who maintains their own Lexus?

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I'm curious to see who maintains their own Lexus and whether for a complete newbie completing more simple jobs like oil and brake changes are easy enough? 

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I do all my own work but I am in the trade and work at a Toyota approved bodyshop so slightly different for me.

The IS250 is about as easy to service as you will find, only thing to watch is doing the cabin filter as you need to make sure it is on the correct heater control setting before changing or you will end up in a whole world of expense when you snap it.

Even doing the spark plugs was easy and there are youtube videos for everything you will need, a little bit time consuming but still very easy to do

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I certainty wouldn't take on an oil or brake change as I don't have the tools or knowledge but I check all the fluids every couple of weeks and top up if necessary.

 

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That is reassuring, and I'm glad you mentioned about the cabin filter s I never new about the controls have to be set up in a certain way.

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2 minutes ago, Dean8788 said:

That is reassuring, and I'm glad you mentioned about the cabin filter s I never new about the controls have to be set up in a certain way.

Yeah its a very easy car to work on, ive owned much worse.

On the cabin filter this is pasted from a clublexus guide "Before you start replacing the air filter, it's crucial to make sure your car is on re-circulation mode. Failing to do so can result in thousands of dollars worth of damage, as the computer control damper will be forced open, ultimately damaging the vehicle's HVAC system. To do this, simply press the "re-circulation" button or mode."

Very few people here seem to work on their own cars though but a quick google will yield guides for pretty much every task, mainly because of how popular the IS is in the US

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From following threads I believe quite a number work on their own car.

They're not that much different to other cars I've worked on.

Try changing oil, oil filter etc on an Alfa 159, what a ball ache of a job.

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Hi as stated the IS 250 is a straight forward car to service ; if you use the correct tools (eg oil filter removal tool ) all the manufactures schedule can be carried out .There are guides on the internet and you can buy time on the Lexus site to access their workshop sheets . I maintain my own cars and the cars of the family ( 7 in total ) .I am a retired old school engineer with 60 years experience with cars and motorcycles so I have an advantage in this respect ,but if you take your time and ensure you follow safe working practice ,it can be done .This probably seems daft to some people to be crawling under cars at 77 but the more I see of todays work by ' technicians ' the more I want to do the job properly myself . Because of the prolonged time laying on the drive doing clutches and exhausts ,I no longer do these jobs:wink3:

Dave

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On 6/20/2017 at 4:16 PM, true blue said:

Hi as stated the IS 250 is a straight forward car to service ; if you use the correct tools (eg oil filter removal tool ) all the manufactures schedule can be carried out .There are guides on the internet and you can buy time on the Lexus site to access their workshop sheets . I maintain my own cars and the cars of the family ( 7 in total ) .I am a retired old school engineer with 60 years experience with cars and motorcycles so I have an advantage in this respect ,but if you take your time and ensure you follow safe working practice ,it can be done .This probably seems daft to some people to be crawling under cars at 77 but the more I see of todays work by ' technicians ' the more I want to do the job properly myself . Because of the prolonged time laying on the drive doing clutches and exhausts ,I no longer do these jobs:wink3:

Dave

I'm with you Dave. I am a retired electronics engineer well into my 70's with hydraulic, pneumatic, and mechanical experience. I do all my own servicing keeping records, and receipts of all work done.

I stopped using the agents when on retiring I took my Prius for service at the Toyota dealers to keep up the service stamps. "was my company car" Two days after the service I had a puncture "fortunately at home" and could not remove the wheel nuts.

On complaining to the dealer about the use of air wrenches to fit wheels I was told the did not use them in the workshop. At that point you could clearly hear someone in the workshop fitting wheels with an air wrench. My local village garage loosened and re torqued the other wheels for me, and they now do any work I cannot get to "exhaust ect" at 1/4 the price. This work is minimal as I can do most tasks. 

John

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I'm on my second lexus now. I'm no mechanic but from the advice given on this forum I've done some basic maintenance jobs.

Cleaned egr valve and changed pads all round on the previous is220d. 

On the 250 I've changed oil and filter. Fitted new pads all round with new discs on front. Fitted new air and cabin filter. Changed brake fluid and coolant.

That's about my limit. Not even going to attempt the 60k spark plug change as it looks very time consuming. 

This job was a doddle on my vauxhall astra. 20 mins and job done.

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1 minute ago, peachy said:

I'm on my second lexus now. I'm no mechanic but from the advice given on this forum I've done some basic maintenance jobs.

Cleaned egr valve and changed pads all round on the previous is220d. 

On the 250 I've changed oil and filter. Fitted new pads all round with new discs on front. Fitted new air and cabin filter. Changed brake fluid and coolant.

That's about my limit. Not even going to attempt the 60k spark plug change as it looks very time consuming. 

This job was a doddle on my vauxhall astra. 20 mins and job done.

Honestly mate doing the spark plugs is no more difficult than changing say pads and discs takes a little bit of time buts its simple enough, there's a very good youtube video out there. Allow yourself a full day so you don't have to rush and anyone can do it as long as you have the right tools

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I do all my own car maintenance and i'm still learning new things with each new issue I come across! YouTube is a fantastic resource for anyone wanting to learn how to do something. I have a 1998 MK4 LS400 and a 1999 Honda accord. 

I've done lots of suspension work on the Honda and have just completed replacing the alternator and ps pump as well as a full service on the Lexus. I enjoy working on the Lexus as it's all brilliantly bolted together, and I enjoy the challenges and satisfaction of fixing them both myself. 😁

I'm 30 so I've a few more years of learning to catch up yet.

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I've seen the youtube videos doug. Looks like half the engine has to be removed and knowing my luck I'll balls it up.

Got a couple of years before I need new plugs thankfully but I think I'll be putting my hands in my pockets for this one.

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2 minutes ago, peachy said:

I've seen the youtube videos doug. Looks like half the engine has to be removed and knowing my luck I'll balls it up.

Got a couple of years before I need new plugs thankfully but I think I'll be putting my hands in my pockets for this one.

They are 60k or 6 years, I did mine last year at 40 odd thousand miles as the car was 6 years old same as yours. They didn't need doing but glad I got it sorted.

If you have a friend who is half confident with a few spanners worth doing it yourself mate you know it is done right that way and you will be shocked how simple it is, its far from half the engine out I assure you, changing fuel filters on lots of modern diesel cars is far more difficult than changing the is250 spark plugs

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I'm a great believer if you can maintain your own car, for the normal servicing, then you will probably get a more thorough job. The dealer technician is always fighting against the clock and sometimes omits the finer details. I maintained my last car, a Mercedes, for the last seven years after servicing costs at dealership became crazy for an older car. Does anyone think the resale value of a Lexus is seriously diminished due to an incomplete dealer service history, or after a certain age does it become irrelevant? I know when I went to trade in my old Mercedes at the Lexus dealership, the salesman offered me a third of what We buy any car had offered me, needless to say, no trade in took place. There is certainly 2 schools of thought regarding full dealer service stamped book and the self- servicing community who want a job done right first time. Is the perceived drop in resale value between the fully stamped vehicle and the self service is as great as the motor trade would have you believe, look forward to all opinions.      

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Hi ,Surebet .I always keep a file with all receipts, check sheets ,MOT s for all work carried out on a car ,my findings are private buyers are usually very pleased to find proof of a well cared for car with documented mileage ,dealers try not to show too much enthusiasm ,but I have usually been able to get a satisfactory result ,although you never know the actual amoumt of difference . Recently I went with my daughter to p/ex a Mercedes which I had serviced for the last 6 years ,the dealer made a big deal of it being outside the franchise system ,but after the deal was concluded ,and I pressed him on this point ,he agreed it had cost us a reduction of £600 , I don't know what 6 Merc services cost but I'm sure we saved a fair bit of money 

Dave

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23 hours ago, Surebet said:

I'm a great believer if you can maintain your own car, for the normal servicing, then you will probably get a more thorough job. The dealer technician is always fighting against the clock and sometimes omits the finer details. I maintained my last car, a Mercedes, for the last seven years after servicing costs at dealership became crazy for an older car. Does anyone think the resale value of a Lexus is seriously diminished due to an incomplete dealer service history, or after a certain age does it become irrelevant? I know when I went to trade in my old Mercedes at the Lexus dealership, the salesman offered me a third of what We buy any car had offered me, needless to say, no trade in took place. There is certainly 2 schools of thought regarding full dealer service stamped book and the self- servicing community who want a job done right first time. Is the perceived drop in resale value between the fully stamped vehicle and the self service is as great as the motor trade would have you believe, look forward to all opinions.      

I think it depends on who your buyer is, as I tend to tinker and modify my cars they are sold privately afterwards and usually private buyers care more about making sure it has actually been done and done correctly which buying from an enthusiast gives them this piece of mind.

For me personally a Full Dealer Service History is far from a sign the car has been looked after and will be a good car but it also isn't a bad thing don't get me wrong. As for savings servicing yourself then what you would loose again it depends how old the car is and such but if you are buying a second hand car worth less than 15k I would safely say you will loose less trading it in after missing dealer stamps than the cost of servicing would have been but always make sure you keep your receipts as proof.

Also a full dealer service history isn't always true, my Dad sold a CR-V a few years back to a "dealership" with no stamps in the book but the car had been serviced, 2 weeks later the car is up for sale with full dealership service history and a photo showing a book of dealership stamps!

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Thanks True Blue and Dougie for your replies relating to experiences you have had. My experience with the motor trade (dealerships in particular) is not the best and repeat visits back after checking work myself has been numerous over the years, I sometimes wonder if the dealerships are only really interested in selling cars and the service side is a lucrative but annoying byproduct of the car sales.I much prefer getting a good honest independent mechanic whose income depends on getting it right first time for jobs I cannot tackle myself. Your views have just backed up my own feelings and given me the confidence in continuing to do the services myself, its good to know there are like minded people out there who are not completely reliant on the dealerships to keep their cars in good order. Again many thanks. 

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For example lets say over 4 years of ownership each minor service at Lexus is £250, and the major services around £400.  Your car would be valued £1300 less because it didn't have a service history.  I think after all the replies I will be doing my own oil changes, to be fair I work for a dealership and could have it done on the cheap but would like to do things myself and be confident in maintaining my own car.

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I know some dealerships now suck the old engine oil out via dip stick tube, I have used both methods and admit the suction method is easier and removes just as much of the old oil. This method is definitely favourite for engines with filter fitted to top of engine, no need to crawl under car at all.  I know with Lexus I still need to go under car to change filter however sucking the old oil out still appeals to me as opposed to dropping it out via sump plug. Any thoughts which is best.

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Hi Alan ,I have used both methods for oil removal ,because the oil capacity is approx 6.3 ltr and my drain tin is 6 ltr ,I find it easier to suck up about 5 litre then remove the plug to finish off ,as it is a lot easier to deal with a small amount of oil sloshing about under the car . Another approach which I use on my other car is a Fumoto valve which replaces the sump plug ,you can fit a short length of tube and drain into a container ,worth doing if you intend to keep the car a while and service it yourself .      You can google details and prices from Fumoto web site 

Dave

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Hi Dave, never knew anything like the Fumoto valve existed, just watched a couple of you-tubes, great idea, certainly would make oil change so much easier with less mess. Thanks for sharing.

 

   

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Yea I do my own stuff as far as it's not a hell of a job, considering I don't have a lift or even a paved surface to work on. I'm probably gonna leave the flywheel and clutch to a shop with a pit or lift as I just cannot be bothered honestly.

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