Recommended Posts

 

Price I believe.

Got some Brembo coming from USA. Will check them out on arrival.

Sent from my STV100-4 using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I doubt a significantly cheaper aftermarket brembo pads will be the same performance as the supplied brembo pads to Lexus. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What's your reasoning for that?

Sent from my STV100-4 using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Comedian said:

What's your reasoning for that?

Sent from my STV100-4 using Tapatalk
 

Lexus or any manufacturer will set the standard as to what they want in terms of braking performance. Without them being packaged by a manufacturer, there is a possibility that the performance is 15% less that OEM based on the regulations that have to be met.
If you have high performance brakes and you complain they are noisy or squeal in the cold. They tend to have another option of brake pad from the same manufacturer that has less braking performance but is still E marked, so meet the standards of being within 15%. The changes made will cure the noise but braking performance is reduced as a result.
I have seen this done by a few manufacturers and I remember this applies to one of the F cars, possibly the RC or IS but I don't remember.
This is based on parts sold in the UK so if your buying them from the US, the tolerance might be different and possibly the standard that they have to reach.

I don't know the ins and outs of the regulations but I thought ill mention this as some aftermarket pads are shocking. If it was possible to use the worst brake pad available by a manufacturer (using the above as an example, 15% less than the best), you could potentially have an aftermarket pad that is 70% the quality of the original top performance pad by the manufacturer. 
Edit: If the brake pad supplier lists the part number then it would make sense that it is tested against that pad :confused1:

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, sometimes hard to know how people arrive at their conclusions which is why I asked. 

I build motorbikes, for road and race, older bikes and I also work suspension and brakes and have several compounds available. There are organic, sintered, better sintered and some sintered with carbon in. Price goes up with performance (usually) but all of them are powerful enough to safely stop and ride. Out the factory they had the least powerful as standard by the way.

While you are probably correct about the cheaper pads being of a lesser performance this is due to compound rather than quality - sintered versus organic in this case - it's also worth considering other issues - sintered tend to work better in the wet. A higher performing pad will wear the disc faster and make much more dust. When we drive on the road we don't have the same issues as track drivers with heat soak. So the brakes can cope with braking from 160mph corner after corner - do I really need that performance? I've got 12 pistons pushing on 30" of disc so unless the pads are garbage it should still be pretty good. Brembo don't put heir name on rubbish. Assuming they are genuine and not fake we are dealing with.

I'm not sure how the manufacturer and brake manufacturer work together. I don't know if Lexus specify a braking force or size. They specified steel due to cost and didn't offer a carbon-ceramic option.

On that basis I would like to experiment with the organic Brembo (sold as ceramic - not really a good name)  (still reputable and made in that size for that size caliper and disc) before deciding. If they are no good I will say so and try some others. I use TRW for racing bikes and I note they do some pads for RCF too. I would not advocate buying some unheard of name from a bargain bin.

It was the RC had a squeaky brakes recall I believe. 

 

Date of work
12/12/2016
Mileage
10197
Details
Attend to complaint of squeak, 611434/PAD KIT, DI,611434/PAD KIT, DI,

I'll try to do a hard braking test and measure the distance then do same with the new pads. Although I got them now I doubt I'll get round to this until spring.

So I'm not pre-judging the result. I want to know for sure if they are up to the job or not and then we will all know for sure. 

Experimental results always trump theory. :)

 

 

EDIT: I also see usual available stuff in manufacturers packaging at 3 times the price. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Comedian said:

Thanks, sometimes hard to know how people arrive at their conclusions which is why I asked. 

I build motorbikes, for road and race, older bikes and I also work suspension and brakes and have several compounds available. There are organic, sintered, better sintered and some sintered with carbon in. Price goes up with performance (usually) but all of them are powerful enough to safely stop and ride. Out the factory they had the least powerful as standard by the way.

While you are probably correct about the cheaper pads being of a lesser performance this is due to compound rather than quality - sintered versus organic in this case - it's also worth considering other issues - sintered tend to work better in the wet. A higher performing pad will wear the disc faster and make much more dust. When we drive on the road we don't have the same issues as track drivers with heat soak. So the brakes can cope with braking from 160mph corner after corner - do I really need that performance? I've got 12 pistons pushing on 30" of disc so unless the pads are garbage it should still be pretty good. Brembo don't put heir name on rubbish. Assuming they are genuine and not fake we are dealing with.

I'm not sure how the manufacturer and brake manufacturer work together. I don't know if Lexus specify a braking force or size. They specified steel due to cost and didn't offer a carbon-ceramic option.

On that basis I would like to experiment with the organic Brembo (sold as ceramic - not really a good name)  (still reputable and made in that size for that size caliper and disc) before deciding. If they are no good I will say so and try some others. I use TRW for racing bikes and I note they do some pads for RCF too. I would not advocate buying some unheard of name from a bargain bin.

It was the RC had a squeaky brakes recall I believe. 

Yeh I was just thinking from the viewpoint of a company that needs to meet the regulations and trying to save pennies from anywhere possible. A good insight into brakes though, didn't know about the different compounds as my cars have never required that much thought into brakes. 
I'm a big fan of TRW parts, never had issues with them whether is to be brakes or suspension.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm thinking the ones I've ordered are actually in old money semi-sintered. Having kevlar so a halfway house if you like. Will keep all updated. I ain't paying lexus 1200 notes

Sent from my STV100-4 using Tapatalk

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, iwonder said:

Yeh I was just thinking from the viewpoint of a company that needs to meet the regulations and trying to save pennies from anywhere possible. A good insight into brakes though, didn't know about the different compounds as my cars have never required that much thought into brakes. 
I'm a big fan of TRW parts, never had issues with them whether is to be brakes or suspension.

http://powersports-blog.denniskirk.com/5573/powersports/motorcycle-brake-pads-sintered-vs-organic/

This is for bikes but boils it down pretty succinctly. 

Problem with a lot of parts sellers, Lexus parts people included, is they don't always have that much knowledge about what they are selling (the number in the book matching the number on the vehicle is enough for them) - which is why I want to see the pads.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok - gave EBC a ring so here it is:

 

Pads in order of performance: Normal - Green stuff - Red stuff - Yellow stuff

Redstuff RC-F pads have been used in an RC-F race car - not yet used in a road acar as far as EBC know (hence don;t appear in search for RC) but they are very high performance and road legal.

Pads to do the whole front axle (both wheels) are £109.44

Yellow stuff pads are in development if you're thinking of racing or tracking your ***** extension.

Regarding rear pads - there are currently none available but the is a part number allocated meaning once the backing plates have been made rear will be available in red and yellow compounds.

So you should be able to do the whole car in red stuff for about £200 versus Lexus £1200

 

Looks like I wasted my time getting the brembos from USA but will be interested to see them anyway.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't believe a part of the human body is considered offensive!!! What about vagina ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would never trust EBC brake pads after seeing a set catch fire on a track day many years ago. 

Would rather use a slightly lower spec Brembo pad than EBC.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I would never trust EBC brake pads after seeing a set catch fire on a track day many years ago. 
Would rather use a slightly lower spec Brembo pad than EBC.
Haven't had as bad an experience with them as that but the pads/discs setup I bought from EBC were very noisy and created too much dust

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Failure is an opportunity to learn and improve. I think 'never use EBC again' is little dramatic. Was cause established? Are you doing trackdays in your RC?

Andrew - the higher the performance the more dust you will get usually - but the red stuff is supposed to be EBC's lowest dust set for the performance you want - assuming you have isf?

Anyway, I've given you the info, it's now up to each person to decide what to do. Your Local Lexus dealer is ready to help empty your wallet if required with the 300% mark up.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Comedian said:

Failure is an opportunity to learn and improve. I think 'never use EBC again' is little dramatic. Was cause established? Are you doing trackdays in your RC?

It was not my car so not sure what the root cause ended up being, but there is no excuse for a brake pad to catch fire due to some heavy braking....IMO. 

Nope, the RC is my day to day car, I have my MR2 for the track which doesn't matter if I end up in the barrier or the kitty litter. :laugh:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just wondering as brake fires can happen but normally it's because brakes set something else on fire like grease or oil. I suspect the owner of the car had a fluid leak which caught fire. Maybe the fluid boiled or the hoses were not upto the job. People can make mistakes when fitting braided hoses for example. And they will always blame a part before themselves. Most problems I see are maintenance errors or lack of maintenance. I rarely see a part failure that can be put down to the cause rather than symptom.

The pads themselves would have been mostly metals. They don't use combustible material.

You might be ruling yourself out of something for no reason.

I loved my mr2 - except when it snowed.



Sent from my STV100-4 using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A lexus dealer in us is selling genuine discs and pads. With import costs would cost about 1300 to do whole car. At least it includes discs. On ebay.

Sent from my STV100-4 using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now