Rashi

Highest Mileage on IS300h

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Thanks matt. It looks bit expensive to me as 400 is only for rare sensors.

I heard about mirror cam front and back... it does recording as well. Could be used as dash cam in other words.

There are a lot on youtube...

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9 hours ago, matt8 said:

Ouch. I'm sure your Lexus dealer will either use someone cheaper or be able to recommend. Like when they farm out cosmetic repairs or alloy wheel refurbs rather than using their own bodyshop. I suppose it's down to how well you know them.

I had sensors fitted to a Volvo V70 by a guy local to me for about £125 iirc and the tech who put my head unit in said he could put colour matched ones on my IS for about £150. 400 quid is definitely steep.

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My 14 plate SE went back with about 110K on the clock and no issues whatsoever,  changed to the Sport now and almost wish I was back in the SE.   These Sport alloys are like putty and I miss the 55mpg I got from the SE.   Plus I had premium Nav in the SE, the current standard infotainment setup is pretty basic.

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My 14 plate SE went back with about 110K on the clock and no issues whatsoever,  changed to the Sport now and almost wish I was back in the SE.   These Sport alloys are like putty and I miss the 55mpg I got from the SE.   Plus I had premium Nav in the SE, the current standard infotainment setup is pretty basic.
Thats right! I am falling in love with this SE... The ride is undoubtedly so smooth. Mine is non nav basic infotainment.. but i am okay with this... i dont know if lex could upgrade that to premium nav. I would love to have that.

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On 12/4/2017 at 3:10 PM, Rashi said:

Thats right! I am falling in love with this SE... The ride is undoubtedly so smooth. Mine is non nav basic infotainment.. but i am okay with this... i dont know if lex could upgrade that to premium nav. I would love to have that.

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You can add Business nav to the basic infotainment system if you really want to. Dealer only thing though

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I bought a Sept. 2013  110K is300h sport recently from Lexus Pre-Approved used - no warranty - exported to Ireland. The unexpected issues I encountered were:

1. worn tahara trim on driver seat (threadbare) - apparently quite common even in low milers - was aware when I bought

2. wipers working intermittently (disconnected the rain sensor - still stop in middle of screen) - uncommon problem - unaware when bought

I replaced the trim (850 euros). I have yet to fix the wipers - I suspect its the switch on the console.

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my wipers where the same I bought my car with 92k now on 100k lexus Bristol changed the wiper motor been ok since.

my fault was not always working on auto wipe and would stop working when driving hope that helps.

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On 21/11/2017 at 8:06 AM, PaulWhitt20 said:

If you intend to do lots of miles then a diesel is more economical At 70+ on the motorway you are not using Battery power so using a 2.5 litre petrol engine to carry a heavy Battery pack about. Hybrids are best on urban driving.


 

I've seen quotes like this a lot, but completely disagree.  Most of my driving is M'way, and I easily return +50mpg (and that isn't at 70).  No other 2.5l petrols automatics give that sort of return.  The EV indicator also shows it is helping the engine on slight inclines and  and receiving charge on declines...

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40 minutes ago, darrude said:

I've seen quotes like this a lot, but completely disagree.  Most of my driving is M'way, and I easily return +50mpg (and that isn't at 70).  No other 2.5l petrols automatics give that sort of return.  The EV indicator also shows it is helping the engine on slight inclines and  and receiving charge on declines...

There really isn't efficiency gains on the motorway from the hybrid system. Energy is lost through charging/discharging the batteries, and the extra weight is a big penalty. The tiny amount of charge you may get from declines isn't nearly enough to provide any assistance on the incline - most of the charge is coming from the petrol engine.

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11 hours ago, ColinBarber said:

There really isn't efficiency gains on the motorway from the hybrid system. Energy is lost through charging/discharging the batteries, and the extra weight is a big penalty. The tiny amount of charge you may get from declines isn't nearly enough to provide any assistance on the incline - most of the charge is coming from the petrol engine.

so can you name a large heavy 2.5L petrol car that returns 50+mpg on the m'way?  Surely the gain if nothing else is from allowing the engine to run at its most efficient, and make up for any shortfall's buy pushing or pulling waste energy to achieve this.  

I would agree referencing the RX400h, it rarely uses the batteries on M'way driving, mine is constantly switching between charge and discharge depending on road conditions.  The Huge uphill stretch on the M62, J21 to J22, drops the Battery charge by about 50% depending the speed you go up there.  

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13 hours ago, darrude said:

I've seen quotes like this a lot, but completely disagree.  Most of my driving is M'way, and I easily return +50mpg (and that isn't at 70).  No other 2.5l petrols automatics give that sort of return.  The EV indicator also shows it is helping the engine on slight inclines and  and receiving charge on declines...

I agree, the bit about on a motorway not using Battery power is ill-informed IMHO - if I watch the display on where the power is being used and generated it's clear that on a motorway the Battery is being used in a lot of circumstances - especially when accelerating - and certainly isn't just a dead weight - and of course is receiving charge when coasting/braking ready to be deployed. With the amount of stop-start traffic and road works around the country it's also common to be in "urban" type stop start or moving at sub 40mph where the car runs mostly off the Battery too. If I have a clear run and not hanging around I still get 50mpg+  - add in a bit of stop start or roadworks it can be a few mpg above this too.

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11 hours ago, darrude said:

so can you name a large heavy 2.5L petrol car that returns 50+mpg on the m'way?  Surely the gain if nothing else is from allowing the engine to run at its most efficient, and make up for any shortfall's buy pushing or pulling waste energy to achieve this.  

I would agree referencing the RX400h, it rarely uses the batteries on M'way driving, mine is constantly switching between charge and discharge depending on road conditions.  The Huge uphill stretch on the M62, J21 to J22, drops the Battery charge by about 50% depending the speed you go up there.  

Most of the economy is from an engine that is quite thermally efficient, running an Aktinson cycle, and a CVT keeping the engine revs at the most efficient. That isn't really anything to do with the hybrid system.

The IS, using a Gen 3 Toyota hybrid system is certainly better on the Motorway that the gen 2 using in the RX400h, but if any significant Battery assistance is provided the Battery is very quickly depleted with no way to charge other than running the engine at a higher rpm to provide power for the propulsion and electrical generation (which is inefficient). The amount of energy recovered from braking/coasting on the gen 3 system is very small.

There are plenty of hyper-milers in the US that have discovered that the least efficient running on the Toyota/Lexus hybrid system is engine and electric assistance at the same time, they do everything to avoid that happening.

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On ‎06‎/‎03‎/‎2018 at 9:15 PM, ColinBarber said:

Most of the economy is from an engine that is quite thermally efficient, running an Aktinson cycle, and a CVT keeping the engine revs at the most efficient. That isn't really anything to do with the hybrid system.

The IS, using a Gen 3 Toyota hybrid system is certainly better on the Motorway that the gen 2 using in the RX400h, but if any significant Battery assistance is provided the Battery is very quickly depleted with no way to charge other than running the engine at a higher rpm to provide power for the propulsion and electrical generation (which is inefficient). The amount of energy recovered from braking/coasting on the gen 3 system is very small.

There are plenty of hyper-milers in the US that have discovered that the least efficient running on the Toyota/Lexus hybrid system is engine and electric assistance at the same time, they do everything to avoid that happening.

Although I agree about the hybrid allowing the engine to run the Atkinson cycle and so be more efficient while electric power fills in the torque needed at low revs that the Atkinson cycle doesn't deliver I do think we perhaps don't give the clever people at Toyota/Lexus the credit they deserve as the thinking they employ in the algorithms seems to go deeper than this. This week I was intrigued to watch how my IS 300h used it's Battery on the motorway. I started out at the bottom of a long steady motorway incline with pretty much a full Battery. The display then showed that while going up the incline the car was using both ICE supplemented by electric all the way up the incline. By the time we reached the top and it levelled out then the Battery was down to about one-third full. The interesting thing was at this point I expected the ICE to recharge the Battery, but it didn't. The car maintained the Battery at about one-third from then on - using ICE and electric on and off - the way it mixes ICE to driving wheels, ICE to Battery and electric to driving wheel varies constantly. My run was on a fairly empty motorway so I was maintaining a steady speed for a probably another 10 miles and the Battery stayed at the one-third full for all that time. Inevitably I then came to leave the motorway and started coasting to slow down - the car went into regen and the Battery started topping up quickly reaching half full and then on leaving the motorway and having to use the brakes more and the ICE to accelerate along the first mile of A roads the Battery was topped up to it's near full state. So, from the above the car isn't simply depleting the Battery and recharging it using the ICE to full again while on the motorway but appears to wait to recharge to make the most use of regen charging even when that wait is for a long time. I had noticed this before but never really watched it as closely as I did this time. I am sure that Toyota/Lexus employ some of the best engineers and mathematicians to calculate the very best way to maximise the overall efficiency of their hybrid system and IMHO the algorithms they develop are actually a lot more sophisticated than we often give them credit for.

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I think you are over estimating how much energy is recovered during braking. Each full energy square that comes up on the 15 minute consumption screen represents 30 Wh. Under long controlled braking, where you make sure only reg braking is used by not allowing the power meter to go off the scale and therefore not engaging the mechanical brakes, you may get three full square if you are lucky, which is 90 Wh.

The IS300h Battery capacity is just under 1500 Wh, so you have charged the Battery 6%. Even if we accept that really little more than 50% of the true Battery capacity is available for use (the in-build redundancy makes the Toyota system ultra reliable) you have still only achieved around 10% recharge - the rest is coming from the petrol engine, through sustained re-charging, whether the Battery indicator shows this or not.

The next gen Toyota hybrid system, used in the current Prius and which will be used in the new Lexus UX, is a big step on. The batteries are able to be recharged at a higher rate, allowing for better regen, the inverter and transmission are more efficient, and electric only modes can operate at much higher road speeds. Even with this system you see a drop in mpg at motorway speeds compared to free flowing urban driving.

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1 hour ago, ColinBarber said:

I think you are over estimating how much energy is recovered during braking. Each full energy square that comes up on the 15 minute consumption screen represents 30 Wh. Under long controlled braking, where you make sure only reg braking is used by not allowing the power meter to go off the scale and therefore not engaging the mechanical brakes, you may get three full square if you are lucky, which is 90 Wh.

The IS300h Battery capacity is just under 1500 Wh, so you have charged the Battery 6%. Even if we accept that really little more than 50% of the true Battery capacity is available for use (the in-build redundancy makes the Toyota system ultra reliable) you have still only achieved around 10% recharge - the rest is coming from the petrol engine, through sustained re-charging, whether the Battery indicator shows this or not.

The next gen Toyota hybrid system, used in the current Prius and which will be used in the new Lexus UX, is a big step on. The batteries are able to be recharged at a higher rate, allowing for better regen, the inverter and transmission are more efficient, and electric only modes can operate at much higher road speeds. Even with this system you see a drop in mpg at motorway speeds compared to free flowing urban driving.

I agree that there would probably have been some engine regen as well as I coasted down from motorway speeds and into the slip road and braked up to the roundabout but there was no doubt about how the algorithms chose not to use the ICE to recharge the Battery back to where it was before a good half of it was used on the incline, but then within that coasting down it jumped from one-third to one-half ready to be used again and then jumped to it's usual 80% very quickly as I went into the stop start of the A roads. My point was that the algorithms are IMO a lot more involved that simply depleting and recharging the Battery - if that was the case they would have just used the ICE to recharge the Battery again during the 10 miles I covered after the incline, but it didn't - the system waited until I was coasting down to a stop and there must have been some logic in that. From the experience I had (and could see on the Battery level display) the algorithms would appear take into account what you are doing and appear to try and predict (yes I know they can't truly know but can probably make a good guess based on a set of circumstances) what you then might be doing next to maximise efficiency and decide how to most effectively recharge the Battery again. However, unless we have access to the source code I doubt we will ever find out fully!

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We should start a highest mileage IS300h thread to see how high we can go. Would be interesting to see what these cars are like at very high mileages. Suspect they'll still feel remarkably tight to be honest

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an interesting thread, especially as I am looking to buy an IS300h that will be averaging 50K a year.

I currently run a 3rd gen Prius that now has 160,000 miles on it and is still going strong, I have had that 2.5 years and put about 125,000 miles on it, most of it town and fast A road driving.

The only things I have had to do aside from servicing are a transmission fluid change at 100,000 miles, a set of discs all round at 155,000 miles, two front shock absorbers last week and every 50k miles I replace the EGR cooler as these block up and can cause head gaskets to blow.

If the IS300h is using gen3 technology then its fair to say it will be bullet proof, does anyone know if the 2.5 IS engine is a derivative of the Prius 1.8 or is it a whole different engine?

 

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132000 on my is300h fsport still going strong no issues and no burning oil!

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