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I was wondering how often other members did this job, the reason I ask is my car was in for some work a Lexus and as part of their service they always do a quick check around the car, they flagged up that one of the rear calipers had seized, I usually do this job once a year but had overlooked it by a couple of months, just managed to free it though, so will be doing it more frequently from now on.

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There are several threads on the various forums about greasing caliper pins, what grease to use or not to use. There is a newly formed company called ProSlip which is marketing a pack of three little

No wheels need to be off the vehicle. We are not all mechanical minded, so do not be afraid to ask better safe than sorry.  Plenty on utube and the like. It seems daunting but is not really. Like

Twice a year - Easter time (after the winter) and around Oct/Nov (before the winter. Always used the red rubber grease and absolutely no issue over 6 years of using it. The seizing will come abou

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1 hour ago, Gramera flash said:

I was wondering how often other members did this job, the reason I ask is my car was in for some work a Lexus and as part of their service they always do a quick check around the car, they flagged up that one of the rear calipers had seized, I usually do this job once a year but had overlooked it by a couple of months, just managed to free it though, so will be doing it more frequently from now on.

I do mine twice a year, when winter tyres go on and come off again.

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Once a year.

I did them last week when I did oil and filter on both cars.

They were as free as a bird when I checked them, but they were dismantled, cleaned and re-greased.

Its such an easy job.

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If yours 'started' to sieze up after a little over 12 months then I guess you are looking at an absolute maximum of 12 month interval in the future, but if it has been exposed to all the salt/grit that has been spread on the roads lately then this might have 'accelerated' the problem.

Last week I had to get all four tyres removed and have 4 new valves fitted as the dust caps ( the previous owner had actually paid and fitted metal ones) had siezed solid onto the valve stems. They had a hex type shape and even a 10mm socket and 'mole' grips on the rubber valve stem could not remove them. I reckon that the combination of aluminium caps onto a steel valve stem had caused some sort of galvanic reaction and this along with all the salt on the roads meant they were almost 'welded' on, that's what it felt like. So £40 later got some simple black plastic dust caps and can check pressures no problem.

paul m.

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27 minutes ago, Texas said:

If yours 'started' to sieze up after a little over 12 months then I guess you are looking at an absolute maximum of 12 month interval in the future, but if it has been exposed to all the salt/grit that has been spread on the roads lately then this might have 'accelerated' the problem.

Last week I had to get all four tyres removed and have 4 new valves fitted as the dust caps ( the previous owner had actually paid and fitted metal ones) had siezed solid onto the valve stems. They had a hex type shape and even a 10mm socket and 'mole' grips on the rubber valve stem could not remove them. I reckon that the combination of aluminium caps onto a steel valve stem had caused some sort of galvanic reaction and this along with all the salt on the roads meant they were almost 'welded' on, that's what it felt like. So £40 later got some simple black plastic dust caps and can check pressures no problem.

paul m.

Texas, one had actually seized, technician said rear calipers are more likely to seize, so will be doing every 6 months from now on.

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Mine are done every 12 months, this year the fronts had to be replaced, rubber boots were perished a lot of corrosion on the slider pins.

I guess every 6 months is probably about right but I would 12 months is an absolute maximum.  

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From past experience I have stopped using the usual choices of either molysuphide? or copper grease on my slider pins, I now used RRG (Red Rubber Grease) which is quite thick and only needs a thin smear but up to now 100% effective in preventing seized slider pins.

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Twice a year - Easter time (after the winter) and around Oct/Nov (before the winter.

Always used the red rubber grease and absolutely no issue over 6 years of using it. The seizing will come about from ill fitting rubber boots which have been attacked by the use of the wrong grease and caused them to stretch and mishapen. The red rubber grease lubricates the pins but does not attack the rubber... job done.

When I doi mine its usually when I service the car which is twice a year (oil change) but while I am doing the pins I will give the moving parts a good squirt of WD40, hasn't done anything any harm but not sure if it helps anything either but its no hassle doing it.

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11 hours ago, Gramera flash said:

I was wondering how often other members did this job, the reason I ask is my car was in for some work a Lexus and as part of their service they always do a quick check around the car, they flagged up that one of the rear calipers had seized, I usually do this job once a year but had overlooked it by a couple of months, just managed to free it though, so will be doing it more frequently from now on.

Would also suggest that it also depends whether the actual pins and bolts have been replaced with new ones.  If it is still the old ones then suggest replacing them as if a slider pin already has excessive rust and muck on them they they will be more prone to sticking.  Also giving the pin recess a good clean out is to be recommended as again excessive dirt and muck in there will also impact the capability of the slider pin to easily do their job.

I replaced all my front ones a couple of weeks ago and they needed it.  I will check them every 6 months and clean and regrease just to make sure they are good.  Still to do my rear ones but have all the parts and looking for a warmer, and sunnier day to do them.

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I don't know if they improved the design, but I haven;t seen the problem in by 2012 200d.

I check them on each service (free movement) and so far no problems. 

Last service, I striped the front ... all looked good to me, but I re-greased anyway.

I'll do the rear's next month when I this year's service.

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The rears are the biggest problem and they really do need cleaning and regreasing every 6 months or they will seize up.

The fronts are a different design and not as prone to seizing as the rears. These can be serviced every 12 months.

Apparently it's an easy job for you guys but I get my Toyota dealership to service mine at every 6 month service. Even your local independent service centre will do all 4 for as little as £40.

It's very important to keep on top of this as new calipers can be quite expensive as I discovered on a previous Lexus.

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Is this something 1st gen IS owners should be aware of? I recall someone mentioning brakes when I asked what to look for last year before picking mine up.

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All modern cars by design need the sliders re greasing . Vw group cars are worse than ours as the rear calipers wind in . I do mine twice a year when winters go on and then off.

Mot today and no advisories so happy days. As somebody above stated red rubber grease is the way to go.

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6 minutes ago, PCM said:

Is it a job that can be done with the wheels on?

( Forgive my ineptitude )

 

No wheels need to be off the vehicle. We are not all mechanical minded, so do not be afraid to ask better safe than sorry. 

Plenty on utube and the like. It seems daunting but is not really. Like above have said if your not confident you may know some body who is.

Like most of us on here, things seems scary or complicated and really are not. At the end of the day we can not all be good at everything. Learning and doing these

kind of jobs is satisfying and also saving money.

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1 hour ago, madasahatter said:

We are not all mechanical minded, so do not be afraid to ask better safe than sorry. 

What's a slider pin?

:biggrin:

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I know my limits Keith. I would royally ____ this up. My problem is that I like older cars but I'm not very handy.

But it's an interesting thread and the advice is much appreciated. I'll pop in to my local garage and have a word. I'd rather not leave it for another 6 months when my next dealer service is due and get an unnecessarily high bill.

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23 hours ago, steve2006 said:

From past experience I have stopped using the usual choices of either molysuphide? or copper grease on my slider pins, I now used RRG (Red Rubber Grease) which is quite thick and only needs a thin smear but up to now 100% effective in preventing seized slider pins.

Be careful, I use Castrol RRG and mine still seized after a little more than 12 months

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17 hours ago, Rebecca said:

The rears are the biggest problem and they really do need cleaning and regreasing every 6 months or they will seize up.

The fronts are a different design and not as prone to seizing as the rears. These can be serviced every 12 months.

Apparently it's an easy job for you guys but I get my Toyota dealership to service mine at every 6 month service. Even your local independent service centre will do all 4 for as little as £40.

It's very important to keep on top of this as new calipers can be quite expensive as I discovered on a previous Lexus.

New caliper is £175

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24 minutes ago, PCM said:

At my garage it cost £39 for all 4 to check and re-grease...

'Grease is the word'

That is reasonable but its not a difficult job to do. Obviously if you are not mechanical minded, its peace of mind and big cost saving over a caliper.

Plenty of indie garages will do this job i imagine. With the bad weather we have had recently, it is something to consider if not been done.

Personally i would wait till april is out. Beast from the north east expected beginning of Easter.

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On 3/5/2018 at 8:33 AM, LennyLexus said:

 

 

3 hours ago, madasahatter said:

That is reasonable but its not a difficult job to do. Obviously if you are not mechanical minded, its peace of mind and big cost saving over a caliper.

Plenty of indie garages will do this job i imagine. With the bad weather we have had recently, it is something to consider if not been done.

Personally i would wait till april is out. Beast from the north east expected beginning of Easter.

I'm not coming down south until 2nd week in April....

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On 22/03/2018 at 9:43 AM, Texas said:

If yours 'started' to sieze up after a little over 12 months then I guess you are looking at an absolute maximum of 12 month interval in the future, but if it has been exposed to all the salt/grit that has been spread on the roads lately then this might have 'accelerated' the problem.

Last week I had to get all four tyres removed and have 4 new valves fitted as the dust caps ( the previous owner had actually paid and fitted metal ones) had siezed solid onto the valve stems. They had a hex type shape and even a 10mm socket and 'mole' grips on the rubber valve stem could not remove them. I reckon that the combination of aluminium caps onto a steel valve stem had caused some sort of galvanic reaction and this along with all the salt on the roads meant they were almost 'welded' on, that's what it felt like. So £40 later got some simple black plastic dust caps and can check pressures no problem.

paul m.

Aluminium on brass valve threads not a good idea or visa versa. Especially coupled with salt.  I have an Ali Boat and a brass screw left in the hull with a bit of salt water sploshing around will see it make a hole to drop through. The founder of Mercury Engines relayed that story to me many years ago as he had had it happen to his Boat. I also couldn't get an Ali cap off a Motorcyle valve.  It was anodised gold but it was still Ali. 

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