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So finally got around to changing my brake Disc and pads all round ( that i brought months ago from Lexus ) over the weekend and guess what they where both seized, I had a feeling they were as the rear disc were not full contacting the old disc, I guess it was wishful thinking that they will be fine lol.

Damn the calipers are not cheap (dont even think about asking Lexus) even refurbished sets are eye watering prices but the garage had no choice then by some miracle and to my surprise the garage managed to free up the pins and get them free so saved me a packet....

Is there away to keep the calipers free from seizing in the future or anything that can be done during servicing, not that i will ever know now as i got new set of pads an disc all round.

 will this have impacted on my MPG and will it  be much better now that the calipers are free?

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I changed my calipers a couple of years ago.

Lexus Bolton do two different sorts, the silly priced ones and the cheap ones (<£100). The cheap ones still come in Toyota boxes with Toyota part numbers.

If you look back through the archive of this site, you should find the details.

 

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I was going to say what John has said above - Calipers from Lexus are not a bad price

It might be an idea to remove, clean and regrease the pins every year - this will proling their life

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Here you go, £179 for the pair, inc VAT and delivery.

 

 

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31 minutes ago, cruisermark said:

It might be an idea to remove, clean and regrease the pins every year - this will proling their life

Maybe, but IMHO it is an overkill (and bad mark for Toyota; I never have a car before anybody even think to remove and grease callipers pins every year). But I agree, pins (and even cylinders) are weak points here, I got problems in both previous GSes. In my mind - if you free up callipers succesfully: 1) newer use old pins nor cylinders, nor any old rubber around them, always immediately replace ALL "small parts" 2) good pro grease (and big load of it), and MOST important 3) keep an eye on "seals", dust covers, any missed or ignored damage guarantee problem with elder calliper in months.

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I think the problem happens more often on the GS450H possibly because of the hybrid system i.e reduced use of the breaking system

I agree with your approach reference new parts.

 

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15 minutes ago, cruisermark said:

I think the problem happens more often on the GS450H possibly because of the hybrid system i.e reduced use of the breaking system

Valid point and I still could not switch my mind fast enough beetween slightly different issues of "old" and "new" automotive.

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To much grease can be a problem on the lower fixed slide pin. If the blind hole the pin slides in has a quantity of grease filling the void at the end of the pin it can cause a hydraulic lock. A sensible modification to the lower pin is to drill the housing and fit a grease nipple.
This allows easy regular lubrication without any dismantling, and if the pin does seize the pin can be pushed out with hydraulic pressure from a grease gun.

John.

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I thought about to drill housing in GS300 once or twice, for easier greasing, easier dry if water in, and easier hammer pin out, just in case 😉 etc. but never decided to do.

Maybe I am wrong and I don't remember exactly, are one or both pins in GS300  with flatten-strip ("groove"), for better greasing and anti-hydrolock by grease? This is good solution in my mind, and all of them should be in this style.

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30 minutes ago, Britprius said:

To much grease can be a problem on the lower fixed slide pin. If the blind hole the pin slides in has a quantity of grease filling the void at the end of the pin it can cause a hydraulic lock. A sensible modification to the lower pin is to drill the housing and fit a grease nipple.
This allows easy regular lubrication without any dismantling, and if the pin does seize the pin can be pushed out with hydraulic pressure from a grease gun.

John.

I managed to repair one of my calipers this way but when I found the cheap ones, I just replaced both with new.

caliper.jpeg

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2 hours ago, AmbroseJohn said:

Here you go, £179 for the pair, inc VAT and delivery.

 

 

wow that was a good price... well i will keep this in mind next time fingers crossed i dont need to

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thanks for the suggestions guys...will see if my local can have a peak every now and then...

he did suggest buying the pins (Lexus only part i was told) which will help in the future but as he managed to free them he was able to refurbish it.

Will this now have an impact on the MPG? will I see increase in MPG difference  compared to before?

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5 minutes ago, usuf_x said:

will I see increase in MPG difference  compared to before?

Could be. I don't remember any significant MPG diff. when I fixed callipers in first or second GS300, but I don't care about MPG too much and your hybrid could be much more sensitive for this "action".

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This topic reminded me that I have not checked my brakes for nearly a year. So having some spare time yesterday I decided to check them out as the brakes had started to squeal in reverse.
There were no problems with the fronts or rear NS, but the OS lower slide pin was seized to the extent that it took considerable force to hinge the caliper on the pin. After much work freeing off the caliper pin I cleaned everything up, and re greased the pins.

While I was at the brakes I descided to paint the calipers, and disc centres adding "Lexus" logo's to the front calipers. Unfortunately I ran out of paint for the front disc centres.
paint used was Aldi silver metallic a very close match to the wheel colour, and only £1-95 a can.

The results are shown below, and the squeal has gone.  

P_20180721_120906.jpg

P_20180721_120843.jpg

P_20180721_121030.jpg

P_20180721_120628.jpg

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One of the main problems for Lexus caliper pins 'seizing' is that they are not attended to in any of the service schedules, and if Lexus come across a siezed unit they will  only recommend  replacement! Which is as already mentioned 'not cheap' so as a preventative measure I have come to accept that inspection and greasing of the pins on a regular basis is the way forward. I accept that this may be a bit of a pain but it does not require any 'special' tools and after doing it a few times the job does not take very long. I will be doing mine every six months so hopefully won't have to inquire about replacement calipers!!!

paul m.

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John @Britprius, well done your calipers look dandy now

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Mine was serviced 2 weeks ago by Lexus and, during service they noted my handbrake was not holding anything and that one of my rear Calipers had seized and needed stripped down.

They did both jobs, without charge, as part of the service. No mention of a new Caliper.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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Interesting John that you say your brakes were squealing.  Ever since I had both my front calipers replaced I have had an occasional squeal when coming to a stop.  If it starts doing it, it usually lasts the rest of my journey.

I have had the dealer look at it and they re-greased the pads and apparently sanded them down flat, but it is still there.

I can't figure it out, so I just ignore it as best I can.

Assuming that my new calipers aren't seized, I am not sure what is left short of replacing the discs and pads, which I wouldn't really want to do until they have worn out.

Oh, and your calipers look really good. :thumbs_up:

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13 hours ago, Shahpor said:

Interesting John that you say your brakes were squealing.  Ever since I had both my front calipers replaced I have had an occasional squeal when coming to a stop.  If it starts doing it, it usually lasts the rest of my journey.

I have had the dealer look at it and they re-greased the pads and apparently sanded them down flat, but it is still there.

I can't figure it out, so I just ignore it as best I can.

Assuming that my new calipers aren't seized, I am not sure what is left short of replacing the discs and pads, which I wouldn't really want to do until they have worn out.

Oh, and your calipers look really good. :thumbs_up:

You can buy self adhesive pads on line that stick on the rear of the pads, and in the past I have found them very effective. Also you can buy "pad goo" a special grease that does not dry out like copper slip. Both items can be had for well less than £5.

John

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John, thanks for suggestion.

My current GS was squelling beast, I put some copper grease and it is better but not perfect yet, maybe I should follow your advice. Or, maybe I would try my old idea, never tested, cut some "pads" from copper or bronze foil to replace steel anti-vibration "pads" behind pads. In theory it could quiet anything and everything, I presume. But I am lazy dude, not inventor.

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nearly 209k miles here and 23 years and never had new calipers ..............  just checked over and appropriately re-greased every year at the service and MOT

I think it's just the correct attention to detail by your servicing guy tbh :wink:

Malc

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9 minutes ago, Malc said:

nearly 209k miles here and 23 years and never had new calipers ..............  just checked over and appropriately re-greased every year at the service and MOT

😜 I got about 200k miles on many 20+yr cars and never had new callipers AND never re-greased or dismantle them yearly, only when pads/discs changed. Only lexuses in my scope (and toyotas too, I presume). So maybe this advice it very good here, but not common. We are not in 1958 (even 1995 was not in 1958), when commonly you had to grease ten points around the wheel, steering and suspension every 3000 miles 😝

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I think you never had to re-grease anything then either, it's just that if you did, and where one can now, then longevity of the item might ensue  :whistling1:

just maybe good practice/housekeeping maybe

Malc

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5 minutes ago, Malc said:

just maybe good practice/housekeeping maybe

Maybe, or "maintenance bandage for designers faults" maybe 😉 nobody is perfect, even Lexus/Toyota, and in other models/brands are different "good practice" advices. In lexus '90-'00 probably there are "re-grease callipers' pins and check upper arms yearly or every 5000 miles, what comes first"... in fords "replace stabilizers and lower arms rubbers yearly", in french cars "re-grease designated half of electronics yearly", in italians, I dont know, probably it was small book. Yearly.

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7 hours ago, Britprius said:

You can buy self adhesive pads on line that stick on the rear of the pads, and in the past I have found them very effective. Also you can buy "pad goo" a special grease that does not dry out like copper slip. Both items can be had for well less than £5.

John

Thanks for the suggestion John.

Perhaps, when it cools down a little, I will have a go at fitting some.

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