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Can anyone confirm that the 2008 Lexus GS 450h uses the 2GR-FSE engine?

As my car approaches 100,000 miles, I'm thinking of carbon build up on the intake values, which is a problem with early direct injection engines. I believe the 2GR-FSE engine has dual port injection which helps solve the problem.

Knowledge of the situation would offer peace of mind and help make the decision, whether to keep it or move it on.

 

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Hi John, yes the mk3 GS450H usese the dual injection 2GR-FSE, ref; https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lexus_GS and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toyota_GR_engine#2GR-FSE

My manual also states;

Engine

Model 2GR-FSE
Type 6-cylinder V type, 4-cycle, gasoline

Isn't valve build up more common with the fuel used stateside vs the EU varieties?

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14 minutes ago, Farqui said:

 

Isn't valve build up more common with the fuel used stateside vs the EU varieties?

Thanks for the info.

 

Yes, the USA do have a bigger problem than Europe but only because we use fuel with 5% Bioethanol. This is due to change to 10% shortly and the problems for direct only injection will be similar for both continents.

 

Doing away with Bioethanol completely and use the land used to grow it, to reinstate the rain forests (IMHO), would be a better option but maybe that's not a debate we should have here. 🙂  

 

 

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Is this the kind of issue that Terraclean could help resolve?


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1 minute ago, Odysseus said:

Is this the kind of issue that Terraclean could help resolve?


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No because that is introduced into the fuel, so would be directly injected into the cylinders. To solve this without dismantling and cleaning manually, something would have to be injected into the air intake. The intake on a direct injection system only controls air intake + the products of the crankcase vent system. Venting the crankcase to atmosphere would solve the problem but the computer would throw a wobbly because it's constantly monitoring vacuum, which would be absent or at least diminished. 

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As I understand it, accelerating slowly mainly applies fuel via the direct injectors which can lead to gummy valves.

If you regularly accelerate quickly and engage the second set of port injectors, then surely they'll help to keep the back of the valves clean? 

Venting to atmosphere isn't PC these days so you could install a catch can inline to the vent hose.  On our engines tho I've no idea how effective a catch can is.

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