Recommended Posts

Is there any setting onthe RX400h that will tell you how many miles are left before you run out of fuel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not found one on mine but when the low fuel light comes on there is more than 30 miles left in there. It says it's a 65 litre tank and on my last fill-up the needle was over the R and the light had been on a while and I only got 56 L in the tank.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There’s no such feature in the RX400 unfortunately. I always thought it was a hell of an oversight not to have it.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Checkout my recent thread here

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/9/2019 at 1:47 PM, ISJason said:

There’s no such feature in the RX400 unfortunately. I always thought it was a hell of an oversight not to have it.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

You say that but my son's Merc C class - 2015 doesnt have a proper one either. It gives you an estimate based on current fuel consumption rather than average mpg so when you turn the car on first thing on a morning, it shows 100 miles on a full tank LOL

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/8/2019 at 11:40 PM, Gliderpilot said:

Not found one on mine but when the low fuel light comes on there is more than 30 miles left in there. It says it's a 65 litre tank and on my last fill-up the needle was over the R and the light had been on a while and I only got 56 L in the tank.

You don't want to routinely run it this low. The fuel in the tank cools the fuel pump and also the more fuel there is the more head pressure there is on the pump meaning it doesn't have to work as hard. If you routinely run your car down to where the light is going to come on you will be putting a lot of strain on the pump. Fill up when you get to the halfway point and your fuel pump will last a lot longer.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Could be worse - my mate rides a fairly modern Honda Hornet, it doesn't even have a fuel gauge; just a "FIND SOME FUEL NOW" light 😁

To make sure it's as stressful as possible, the rider has to manually reach down and fumble for a Normal/Reserve tank switch on the side of the bike somewhere and switch it over to a lower input in the tank to make sure they can get to a petrol station!  Haha!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My second car back in the late sixties was a VW Beetle😂 had no fuel gauge. It had an angled lever down by the clutch and you turned it 90 deg with your foot when it start stalling from fuel starvation, you were then on the reserve tank with a gallon left find the next garage. 

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Earlier this week I ran to 50 miles with the 'fuel low' warning light on. On filling up I managed to get 59 litres in (after adding more 4 times after the fuel pump clicked off). I have reached 55 miles before, but, I think 50 is around the most I want to go to.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One option would be to use a Bluetooth dongle plugged into the OBD2 port. Most of the compatible smartphone apps have the ability do show the sort of information you need like MPG, distance to zero, fuel level etc. and show it on a smart phone screen. If you have an old android smart phone sat in a drawer, then it can be resurrected with the right app as an eco-readout!

You may have to put the tank capacity into the app as that data isn't available from the vehicle, but once you program it with the tank capacity and where the fuel level is reading, you can get a readout of tank capacity and miles to zero.

Of course the accuracy is only as good as the information you put in, but that's really the only way to generate the information.

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/11/2019 at 12:13 PM, Delphius1 said:

One option would be to use a Bluetooth dongle plugged into the OBD2 port.

I know a mechanic who advises against such things. The OBD socket isn't designed to have something permanently connected to it, and on some cars this can cause problems. That said the makers of these devices are still in business so I would hazard a guess that enough people are able to use them without a problem.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.