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Hi folks. 

My is250 2007 is showing P017 fault code, which brings on warning lights on the dash. I’ve replaced the sensor but to no avail. 

Before I set about replacing the timing chain (big job), can anyone tell me how long a chain should last for. I want to make sure it’s the chain  

My milage is 80,000 ish.

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One more question guys.

The reason I asked about the millage. I keep getting P017 fault code. Bank 1 sensor B.

Can anyone tell me where this sensor hides?

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Is this of any help.

Sensor B refers to exhaust camshaft.767825452_IS250camsensors.thumb.png.0997eee87433e368b1b09789f66a675a.png

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Never heard of a chain going in all of the years i have owned one of these. People on the forum with twice your mileage with no reports of issues with chains....

Would only put it down to the car not being maintained and the chain has stretched a bit

 

Since you replaced the sensor have you reset the ecu?

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Sorry for not replying guys. Never got any notification of replies.

Thanks Beamish.

Newbie I have reset it everytime I swap or replace a sensor.

My local garage said it's probably the chain if I've investigated the sensors the way I have.

I managed to get a chain sensor for £147 new. Lexus don't do them.

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Worn timing chain causing this problem is a known issue, but not usually at that millage.
There is an inspection cover on the front driers side of the engine for the chain tensioner. Or the drivers side cam cover can be removed. If the tensioner is at it's tensioning limit it is the chain that has worn.
There is a cheat way of changing the chain without dismantling the front of the engine. I have not done this on a Lexus, but I have done it on a Mercedes 350SLC with complete success in 2 hours. The Lexus if anything looks easier to do than the Merc.

John.

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Thanks Britprius.

I checked your hint before I started. The tensioner was at it's limit. Didn't even know that plate was there.

Stripped the engine to where I remove the timing chain cover plate.

I've struck a problem. The plate is loose and all the sealant is split. However I can't remove the plate. Something is holding it.

Does anyone know if there is something behind the plate the holds it in place, or is there a key, or something, on the sump plate?

I don't want to use too much force.

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If you do a search on "Youtube" I think you will find a video of the complete strip and rebuild of the Toyota V6 engine for replacing the timing chain. This should help you find what is holding the plate.
The chain can be replaced however by splitting the chain on the drivers side cam sprocket after the tensioner is removed. Then attach the new chain "also split" with a split link. A simple tool can be made and bolted over the sprocket to keep the chain in contact with the sprocket so as not to loose the timing. The engine is wound over by hand until the split link appears. The link is then removed, and used to join the new chain that is now in the engine. 
The tensioner is refitted after winding it back to it's start position then releasing it against the chain to tension it. As said previously I have done this on a Mercedes V8 engine, and looking at the Toyota V6 there is little if any difference.

I hope something there helps you.

John.

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Hi Britprius.

I watched numerous YouTube videos. Loads of informative stuff that's been helpful. That said they are also a bit misleading.

I tried to free the timing chain cover plate, literally for hours. Trying all I could, until my patience ran out and I resorted to strength (temper) and pulled a little harder. Only then did I find out that the oil scavenger pipe is actually bolted to the place. Not as the videos indicated. None show it to be bolted. So, new pipe ordered at £98 from Lexus.

For anyone reading this in the future, to access the the nuts that connect the oil scavenger pipe to the front plate, you need to drop the steering rack and then drop the 'large' sump. You'll need to access four bolts in the 'small' sump. There are also two nuts that are very difficult to reach. I had to remove some of the bell housing so I could get a socket in.

As you say I could have just changer the chain, but I went for fitting a chain kit that has all the timing components.

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What a mess. I can see why you wanted to take the cover off, but in the past I have found that rarely are the guides worn particularly on a low millage like yours. However it is not unreasonable to change them with the chain. Let us know how things work out.

John.

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Britprius, I found that one of the black guides had broken and one had cracks in it.

I've had this car from almost new, so I know it's now been abused.

The plunger that takes up the slack was only just touching the guide.

So glad I did this much.

Mostly rebuilt now, just waiting on the pipe that has a 2 week delivery from Japan.

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