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Hanging is too good for some people.


Mincey
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I was attending a course in Uxbridge yesterday and today which required an overnight stay. I was booked in to the Slough Holiday Inn. Not one of the most salubrious establishments I have had the pleasure or good fortune of staying in but I digress. The parking looked a bit iffy - narrow spaces filled with various Scheissewagens and those awful electric Telsa things, and frankly I did not want to run the risk of Betsy incurring any dings, dents or scrapes. By luck, there was an underground car park. I hatched a plan. I would park Betsy in the furthest corner of the underground car park. She would be safe there, surely. Nobody would park next to her, would they? This is the sight which greeted me this morning after I checked out:

 

117835102_carpark.thumb.JPG.42c18ed09a8b24a710c170b72aeb5a85.JPG

There were plenty of other unoccupied spaces in the car park but no, they chose to park RIGHT NEXT TO BETSY. They didn't even have the courtesy to park over more towards their right hand line did they? I was parked as close to the wall as I dare to reduce the risk of unwanted damage. Had I had the time, I would have waited for the owner of that 똥 더미 to return (Google Translate is your friend) so I could question him (or her) on why they parked right next to me, and depending upon the size and build of the driver, possibly given them a bunch of fives too for good measure. I was barely able to get in. Were I an unkinder type, the rivets in my jeans might have "brushed up" against the other car's paintwork. However I am not a bad man. I didn't even leave a note underneath their wiper blade doubting their intelligence and parentage.

 

 

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I don't really see a problem with that. You don't know what was in the bay to the other side when the Hyundai was parked,

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7 minutes ago, Dippo said:

I don't really see a problem with that. You don't know what was in the bay to the other side when the Hyundai was parked,

I guess not, but perhaps the fact that most of the spaces in the car park were unoccupied when I checked out implies that they made a deliberate effort to park there and not in one of the many other empty spaces. 

Try this. Park somewhere at the back of a supermarket car park and see if someone sticks their car right next to yours, even though there are plenty of other spaces to park in, the vast majority of which are closer to the supermarket entrance.

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I don't see much wrong either I'm afraid. If you park next to a 'nice' Lexus the chance of the 'nice' Lexus driver bashing his door is reduced, plus he has only one side to worry about now.

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Yes annoying, but spaces in underground car parks are not generous and from the picture probably only 6 inches or so off from dead centre in the space. My experience is those that reverse park are generally the more considerate drivers, plus most likely did not have a passenger so less likely to ding your door.

I remember staying in that hotel when we took the kids to Legoland many years ago and still recall how rude the staff were in the restaurant.

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3 hours ago, Mincey said:

I was attending a course in Uxbridge yesterday and today which required an overnight stay. I was booked in to the Slough Holiday Inn. Not one of the most salubrious establishments I have had the pleasure or good fortune of staying in but I digress. The parking looked a bit iffy - narrow spaces filled with various Scheissewagens and those awful electric Telsa things, and frankly I did not want to run the risk of Betsy incurring any dings, dents or scrapes. By luck, there was an underground car park. I hatched a plan. I would park Betsy in the furthest corner of the underground car park. She would be safe there, surely. Nobody would park next to her, would they? This is the sight which greeted me this morning after I checked out:

 

117835102_carpark.thumb.JPG.42c18ed09a8b24a710c170b72aeb5a85.JPG

There were plenty of other unoccupied spaces in the car park but no, they chose to park RIGHT NEXT TO BETSY. They didn't even have the courtesy to park over more towards their right hand line did they? I was parked as close to the wall as I dare to reduce the risk of unwanted damage. Had I had the time, I would have waited for the owner of that 똥 더미 to return (Google Translate is your friend) so I could question him (or her) on why they parked right next to me, and depending upon the size and build of the driver, possibly given them a bunch of fives too for good measure. I was barely able to get in. Were I an unkinder type, the rivets in my jeans might have "brushed up" against the other car's paintwork. However I am not a bad man. I didn't even leave a note underneath their wiper blade doubting their intelligence and parentage.

 

 

I'm just here to say I, the exceptional, sympathise. Ignore fellow commenters, they are numb on sedatives. This was a member of the cretinati, it's a large movement. On the plus side, they at least folded the mirrors, but that's probably only because it's automatic and they wouldn't know how to turn it off. 

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1 hour ago, Spock66 said:

Yes annoying, but spaces in underground car parks are not generous and from the picture probably only 6 inches or so off from dead centre in the space. My experience is those that reverse park are generally the more considerate drivers, plus most likely did not have a passenger so less likely to ding your door.

I remember staying in that hotel when we took the kids to Legoland many years ago and still recall how rude the staff were in the restaurant.

When spaces are tight, logic dictates to park in an alternating pattern of forward-reverse so that driver/passenger sides match up between cars - passenger sides can be a few inches from each other, leaving plenty of space on the drivers' side. 

But that would require an extra 0.0001% mental effort. Surely we cannot expect that.

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I was expecting to find a topic on child murderers, or some owners car had scraped your car and had driven off. 

It happened to us in Normandy, France when our Toyota Corolla was 3 months old many years ago in 2007. 

James.

 

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My wife and I have long had a running bet about whether we will find a car or cars next to ours after parking by choice in glorious isolation in remote parts of car-parks.  She says we will and, as the optimist in the family, I say we won’t.  My estimate is that she’s ahead two to one.  

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9 hours ago, beyond the blue said:

I don't see much wrong either I'm afraid. 

I went to the effort of parking in the furthest, most remote place of the car park and someone still parked next to me even though there were plenty of other spaces nearer the exit/doors! 

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I had similar but worse situation some years ago when I parked my MB SLC quite near the entrance to  motorway services centre due to urgent need to use the 'Facilities' on that occasion.  My wife stayed in the car and when I returned I noticed a small mark on the passenger door.  My wife said another car had parked and  driven off. When my wife remonstrated with the lady driver she had been told "a blind man wouldn't notice it".  Such is the attitude of some drivers and yes I was nicely parked.  I always park well away from the entrance to services, supermarkets etc, parks generally.  Cars seem to be growing in size but few parks enlarging the size of the spaces, which doesn't help.  

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7 minutes ago, Barry14UK said:

When my wife remonstrated with the lady driver she had been told "a blind man wouldn't notice it".  

Well that’s obviously true.

But I believe the saying is actually “A blind man would be grateful to see it.”

Clearly this driver’s carelessness knows no boundaries!

And I too find that cars have a tendency to grow wider with each new model, but parking bay sizes stay the same for years.

One exception, I find, is Costco.  Plenty of space there to facilitate easy loading.

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It's nothing new, must be nearly 20yrs ago, I was parked up in a deserted seaside car park when a car pulled up beside us and 'bang' driver clouts our nearside rear door. I leaped out much to the old boy's surprise (the Alhambra had limo tint, he obviously thought no one was in the car) and checked the damage. A quite severe crease in the door. He initially denied it but when my wife and daughters all lowered their windows he capitulated and surrendered his insurance details (the same company as me).

Slightly ironically the car he was driving was a bodyshop courtesy car!

Two weeks later, arriving home the insurance papers were on the doormat repairs all authorised. Total cost £1500 as new door skin required..

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Can't say I'm surprised Mincey. Happens to me far too frequently. My other half has given up complaining about the longer walk to the shops or whatever.

I'd just be thankful there was no damage. 

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Many years ago we parked to go for a walk in a completely empty car park in the middle of winter near Burnham on Crouch in Essex. While we were putting on our walking boots at the back of the car a 4x4 came into the car park and proceeded to park in the very next space to us. As the drivers door opened we heard the father say to his kids " Be careful how you open the doors as there isn't much room" 

I wanted to say something to him but my wife dragged me away noticing I was rapidly turning into Victor  Meldrew !!

 

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2 hours ago, Barry14UK said:

Cars seem to be growing in size but few parks enlarging the size of the spaces, which doesn't help.  

developers will usually maximise the number of parking bays with, I'm informed a while back, the planning rules on  individual car parking spaces being regulated by the minimum specified in some 1930's legislation  .........  my 1930's Triumph seems quite miniscual these days 

I sometimes, when a Blue Badge space isn't free ( as a holder thereof ) misbehave and overlap to avoid someone parking up against my driver's door 

Malc

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When working away my hotel didn't have a car park, I had to use the public pay and display. The spaces were miniscule (I was driving a C class, nothing huge) so I would straddle two spaces at the end of the row.

One morning I was greeted by the parking attendant, who was about to 'chastise' me for my parking when I showed him I had paid for two spaces. "Ah, fair play mate" :wink3:

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I am glad I am not the only one with car OCD on the forum 😉

Always park well away from the crowds at the supermarket.

If parking at an airport I will happily spend 15-mins driving round so I can find an end space, parking right on the white line to maximise the available space.

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At this point I feel it appropriate to mount one of my personal hobbyhorses and mention the subject of dashcams!

Suffice it to say that cameras back and front, operating in Parking Mode, and sensitive to motion and impact, will identify careless parkers.

Imagine the impact when - some days later - a demand for restitution accompanied by video evidence, finally catches up with the transgressor!

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3 minutes ago, LenT said:

At this point I feel it appropriate to mount one of my personal hobbyhorses and mention the subject of dashcams!

Suffice it to say that cameras back and front, operating in Parking Mode, and sensitive to motion and impact, will identify careless parkers.

Imagine the impact when - some days later - a demand for restitution accompanied by video evidence, finally catches up with the transgressor!

One has the footage, with vehicle registration, how does one obtain the registered keeper's address?

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4 minutes ago, LenT said:

At this point I feel it appropriate to mount one of my personal hobbyhorses and mention the subject of dashcams!

Suffice it to say that cameras back and front, operating in Parking Mode, and sensitive to motion and impact, will identify careless parkers.

Imagine the impact when - some days later - a demand for restitution accompanied by video evidence, finally catches up with the transgressor!

I hear what you are saying about dashcams Len - I have both front and rear ones in fact - but I think that prevention is better than cure in this regard.

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18 minutes ago, NemesisUK said:

One has the footage, with vehicle registration, how does one obtain the registered keeper's address?

Well on the one occasion that I had to do it, the Police did it for me after having viewed the video footage.  But that was a driving incident rather than damage and driving away.

In that circumstance I believe the DVLA will supply the registered owner details if you provide sufficient evidence - which I suggest that video footage of driving away after causing damage may well qualify.

I believe it involves a Form V888 and the handing over of a modest sum.  Alternatively, of course, if the damage is severe, I would expect your Insurers would do it all.

 

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This being a Lexus owners’ forum, the narratives naturally tend to be one-sided.  But, dare I say it, there must be someone somewhere in the world whose car got a ding or scratch from parking next to a Lexus.  

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