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TPMS SENSORS


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Hi All  I have at the present 4 very corroded wheels on my MK3 gs300.

I have just bought 4 unused OEM 17" Lexus alloys which are identical to my badly corroded ones.

I will be putting new tyres on my new alloys, however my I have not got any TPMS sensors and OEM Lexus ones are about £100 each.

1) Should I use the ones in my old wheels?

2) should I buy a generic set, and will they work with the present set up.

3) should I just forgot about the TPMS system and live with the warning light.

4) Can I get the TPMS warning light deleted.

TIA Any ideas or comments would be fab. Cheers Mark

 

 

 

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You can get repair kits for the valve body, but bear in mind the batteries only have a finite life.

I would be inclined to replace them with new ones, but shop around for compatible replacements which should be significantly cheaper.

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56 minutes ago, markwantsalexus said:

Hi All  I have at the present 4 very corroded wheels on my MK3 gs300.

I have just bought 4 unused OEM 17" Lexus alloys which are identical to my badly corroded ones.

I will be putting new tyres on my new alloys, however my I have not got any TPMS sensors and OEM Lexus ones are about £100 each.

1) Should I use the ones in my old wheels?

2) should I buy a generic set, and will they work with the present set up.

3) should I just forgot about the TPMS system and live with the warning light.

4) Can I get the TPMS warning light deleted.

TIA Any ideas or comments would be fab. Cheers Mark

 

 

 

There’s no point in using the old ones.  TPMS batteries are generally regarded as having about 5 - 10 years life, depending on usage.  If these are the originals than they’re obviously well past that.

When I had to replace a TPMS valve I was at a large, local tyre retailer.  They had no trouble matching the Lexus valve with an equivalent.  They charged me about £60, including fitting and programming.  So I’d be inclined to ring your local tyre supplier to check them first.

Setting up the system itself should be covered in the Manual, if you have one.  But remember to set the tyre pressures first!

As for whether it’s worth even having the system…I would say yes.  Incorrect pressure is a real killer for tyres and I had the warning come up on a really cold winter’s day because a slightly low pressure had dropped a little further.

It’s also a very good early warning of a slow leak - which is always worth investigating.

Good luck!

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10 hours ago, LenT said:

As for whether it’s worth even having the system…I would say yes.

11 hours ago, markwantsalexus said:

and OEM Lexus ones are about £100 each.

As a prehistoric, well pre TPMS monster from here ......... I have a very simplistic view on TPMS and it's that if you don't need to have it, for say the MOT, which YOU Mark do not, being too old a car ...  then at an OEM cost of @ £500  ( for 5 x wheels ) or a tad less for non OEM ..  it seems a little excessive a " nice to have ",  just to check the tyre pressures from time to time :whistling:

But of course everyone to their own and vehicle perfection if needed  ..........  and if indeed you can turn off the darned warning light on the dash if it pops irritalingly up :unsure:

Malc

 

Reminds me chatting to an Alvis car owner at the weekend with his beautiful monster 1933 open tourer car ........ at a Classic Car Event in Kent ...... his postulating that it's wonderful not to have all that electronic gadgetry to go kaput and costing a fortune to remedy 

M

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18 minutes ago, Malc said:

As a prehistoric, well pre TPMS monster from here ......... I have a very simplistic view on TPMS and it's that if you don't need to have it, for say the MOT, which YOU Mark do not, being too old a car ...  then at an OEM cost of @ £500  ( for 5 x wheels ) or a tad less for non OEM ..  it seems a little excessive a " nice to have ",  just to check the tyre pressures from time to time :whistling:

But of course everyone to their own and vehicle perfection if needed  ..........  and if indeed you can turn off the darned warning light on the dash if it pops irritalingly up :unsure:

Malc

What intrigued me, Malcolm, is that Mark has already told us that he has bought new alloys and is about to buy new tyres. 
So his investment in his 16 year-old car is already substantial and suggests he’s planning to keep it.

So the additional spend to restore an original feature may give a satisfying sense of completion.  Hopefully, Mark will let us know!

32 minutes ago, Malc said:

Reminds me chatting to an Alvis car owner at the weekend with his beautiful monster 1933 open tourer car ........ at a Classic Car Event in Kent ...... his postulating that it's wonderful not to have all that electronic gadgetry to go kaput and costing a fortune to remedy 

So true, Malcolm.  It is ironic that it takes increasingly complex technology to make our lives simpler!

I could dismantle much of my early cars.  Now, while my cars are far superior in every respect, almost everything under the bonnet is a mystery to me.

I can recall driving down Oxford Street in London in my first car - an elderly Ford Anglia - when the engine died as the lights turned red.  I was out of the car, with the bonnet up, diagnosing and rectifying a dislodged HT Lead and back in restarting the engine before the lights changed to green.

At the time, I was quite impressed.

The new lady friend in the passenger seat…not so much.

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Hi Thanks for the replies.

My situation is that my MK3 is a bit of an old banger. I wasn't particularly bothered about the visuals of the car, I have to go to work through narrow Devon lanes/bocages, so the car would take a bit of a beating.

I only paid £1100 for it, I have done the water pump and had the exhaust welded up. I think December MOT will decide whether or not I keep it!

The alloys are new and unused in their packing boxes with cellophane wrapping. They came with new wheel bolts, but not TPMS sensors or centre caps. I picked them up for £250, cheaper than a refurbishment.

I have booked the car in for new tyres on Friday. As it stands I am not going to bother with the addition expense of the TPMS sensors.

If the car was to be sold as spares or repairs in December, I will put the old wheels back on and I will have a nice set of wheels to sell on. 

So once again thank you for all your advice and opinions.

The question I have now, is how do I remove the TPMS orange warning light from the dash?

Mark

 

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18 minutes ago, markwantsalexus said:

Hi Thanks for the replies.

My situation is that my MK3 is a bit of an old banger. I wasn't particularly bothered about the visuals of the car, I have to go to work through narrow Devon lanes/bocages, so the car would take a bit of a beating.

I only paid £1100 for it, I have done the water pump and had the exhaust welded up. I think December MOT will decide whether or not I keep it!

The alloys are new and unused in their packing boxes with cellophane wrapping. They came with new wheel bolts, but not TPMS sensors or centre caps. I picked them up for £250, cheaper than a refurbishment.

I have booked the car in for new tyres on Friday. As it stands I am not going to bother with the addition expense of the TPMS sensors.

If the car was to be sold as spares or repairs in December, I will put the old wheels back on and I will have a nice set of wheels to sell on. 

So once again thank you for all your advice and opinions.

The question I have now, is how do I remove the TPMS orange warning light from the dash?

Mark

 

I rather think, Mark, that with this new information you’ve pretty much answered your own questions. I have had some slight experience of the lanes of which you speak and understand your thinking!

As for the persistent TPMS warning light…would a small square of black electrical tape solve the problem?

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16 hours ago, markwantsalexus said:

My situation is that my MK3 is a bit of an old banger.

Oh my, wot sacrilege  ..  any Mk3 is a wondrous joy to behold :thumbsup:

Malc

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2 hours ago, Malc said:

Oh my, wot sacrilege  ..  any Mk3 is a wondrous joy to behold :thumbsup:

Malc

It’s alright Malcolm.  Mark’s new around here.

I’m sure he didn’t mean it.  😢

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PXL_20220708_154127999.thumb.jpg.1aca6729ca36c90cfa0c856cd492f553.jpgPXL_20220708_151611250.thumb.jpg.eb34f38efcad65b59d6177a8ca1f1737.jpgHi Malc, LenT, and Lexus enthusiasts. I think that in hindsight I shouldn't have used the "B" word! My car is rather neglected and in need of some TLC.

Today I treated her to some new alloys and fresh tyres, and she looks much better for it😀

A couple of photos, I hope that you approve of the upgrades.

 

Mark

 

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