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Global_Grafix

Limited Slip Diff - Is200 Sport

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Not only is my V5 wrong, but im starting to wonder whether my car is what its supposed to be.

During my service yesterday it was found that my Diff is not a LSD !

I thought that the Sport had an LSD as standard fit !

I need to know more before i take this further.

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Is it a UK supplied recent Sport - if so yes. If it's back to a 1999 ish car then think the sport was a basic model with cloth trim, might have been called an "S" - not sure.

How can you tell if you have an LSD - I'll check mine in the morning ;)

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Is it a UK supplied recent Sport - if so yes. If it's back to a 1999 ish car then think the sport was a basic model with cloth trim, might have been called an "S" - not sure.

How can you tell if you have an LSD - I'll check mine in the morning ;)

in 99 u still got the S, SE and sport models - sport still had LSD.

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Is it a UK supplied recent Sport - if so yes. If it's back to a 1999 ish car then think the sport was a basic model with cloth trim, might have been called an "S" - not sure.

How can you tell if you have an LSD - I'll check mine in the morning ;)

the sports always been a sport with the s being the lower end and the se in the mid range from what i know?

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Well theres something totally amiss with mine then, cos its a 2001 Sport, with no LSD. My brother checked it by putting her on the ramp and turning one of the rear wheels. The opposite didnt move. If its an LSD the other side should move also.

If it turns out that my car has been rebadged as a sport then the dealer is gonna get a warhead up his starfish pretty damn quickly.

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Pete, can you get a pic of the diff...........

If you give chris shipley your VIN number, he should be able to tell you the spec

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yeah, thanks matt. I will piccie it this weekend and post it here. I didnt think there was a difference cosmetically. I will let chris have vrn etc so he can check.

cheers again matt

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My brother checked it by putting her on the ramp and turning one of the rear wheels. The opposite didnt move. If its an LSD the other side should move also.

Was it in gear?

Standard diff, turn 1 wheel with the driveshaft locked (in gear) & the other wheel should turn in the opposite direction. I would expect an LSD to behave the same when turning by hand.

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with an LSD the wheels should turn in the same direction. Open diff in the opposite direction.

Also if you turn one wheel you should be able to stop the other wheel easily with an open diff but not with an LSD

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Or turn off the traction control, drop the clutch and see if both wheels make a mark !!!

franmac.

I have an open diff and I leave 2 marks when i dump the clutch... :unsure:

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Or turn off the traction control, drop the clutch and see if both wheels make a mark !!!

franmac.

I have an open diff and I leave 2 marks when i dump the clutch... :unsure:

Can someone explain this to me. I thought with an open diff you effectively have only one wheel drive i.e the wheel with least resistance.

franmac

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The LSD is the IS200 is called a Torson LSD. My (limited) understanding of this technology is that the test performed above (turning one wheel and expecting the other to bind), is only valid for traditional clutch operated LSDs. Toyota also uses this technology in FWD cars.

Where are our technical gurus hiding?

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with an LSD the wheels should turn in the same direction. Open diff in the opposite direction.

Also if you turn one wheel you should be able to stop the other wheel easily with an open diff but not with an LSD

Should an LSD not behave the same as a standard diff in such non violent testing?

It's only under power that the diff becomes locked forcing the wheels to turn together - otherwise, when turning a corner, one wheel would be dragged since the distance travelled is different.

I'm no expert, but this was my understanding. Feel free to educate me.

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with an LSD the wheels should turn in the same direction. Open diff in the opposite direction.

Also if you turn one wheel you should be able to stop the other wheel easily with an open diff but not with an LSD

Should an LSD not behave the same as a standard diff in such non violent testing?

It's only under power that the diff becomes locked forcing the wheels to turn together - otherwise, when turning a corner, one wheel would be dragged since the distance travelled is different.

I'm no expert, but this was my understanding. Feel free to educate me.

indeed, The Torsen differential* is a purely mechanical device.

The IS200 uses a Torsen® differential on the rear axle.

The Torsen (from Torque Sensing) works as an open differential when the amount of torque going to each wheel is equal. As soon as one wheel starts to lose traction, the difference in torque causes the gears in the Torsen differential to bind together. The design of the gears in the differential determines the torque bias ratio.

For instance, if a particular Torsen differential is designed with a 5:1 bias ratio, it is capable of applying up to five times more torque to the wheel that has good traction.

I am not sure what Bias the is200 differential is....

Like viscous coupling Differentials, they are used to transfer power between the wheels. In this application, the Torsen is superior to the viscous coupling because it transfers torque to the Good wheel before the actual slipping occurs.

However, if one of the rear wheels loses traction completely, the Torsen differential will be unable to supply any torque to the other set of wheels. The bias ratio determines how much torque can be transferred, and five times zero is zero.

*TORSEN is a registered trademark of Zexel Torsen, Inc.

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