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Installing A Jacuzzi


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just wondering what the general good practice should be when installing a jacuzzi, with regards the power.

im thinking that the main power should be run to outside of the bathroom, to say a fused spur.

correct

should also be protected by residual current circuit breaker

and fitted by a qualified electrician

as required by law from next year

:)

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yeh the RCD goes without saying, this will be in the consumer box,,

as for qualified,, does my city and guilds elctrical installation (admitadly 11 years old) cover me..

as for this crap about it being against the law to do this yourself next year.. i wonder how they will enforce this.. have the DIY police vist every person who buys a piece of equipoment from a DIY store..

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yeh the RCD goes without saying, this will be in the consumer box,,

as for qualified,, does my city and guilds elctrical installation (admitadly 11 years old) cover me..

as for this crap about it being against the law to do this yourself next year.. i wonder how they will enforce this.. have the DIY police vist every person who buys a piece of equipoment from a DIY store..

11 years old :crying:

things have changed a little bit

they will enforce it by the fact every job needs to be certified

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do all electrical jobs need to be done by a certified electrician from next year then? or is it just bigger jobs or what? certainly something to think about for my next house refurb project i think.

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do all electrical jobs need to be done by a certified electrician from next year then? or is it just bigger jobs or what? certainly something to think about for my next house refurb project i think.

all jobs !

for any jobs carried out a certificate must be issued, the only people able to issue these will have to be suitably qualified

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they will enforce it by the fact every job needs to be certified

Enter stage left a bunch of people who will certify anything (for a large fee).

Typically they will have passed an exam but have no useful experience.

Obviously they're more competent than someone who's done the job all their life.

It's the same as corgi registration on the plumbing side.

Oh and tossers who have piles of microsoft certification and can't work an on/off switch.

Without instructions like 'move mouse here, click button there' they're lost.

Grrrr :angry::angry::angry:

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yeh man i know things have moved on,,

wonder how 'they' will know if a job has been done or not..still dont see how it can be enforced..

would it be a case that for home insurance every appliance will need a cert or what..

it will start and be easily enforced on all new properties, this will state exactly what the installation consists of, any alterations will show up when selling or renting the property, or in the event of any accident or event

general practice is now that when you sell or buy a house a certificate is issued, to cover the existing installation

this is now being a requirement of insurance and mortgage companys

but yes it will be hard to enforce, but the main aim is to stop innocent householders employing cowboys,

it will work in much the same way as the corgi gas registration works now

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thats outrageous!!!!!!! so legally i wont be able to put new sockets or lights in?

like paul says tho, how the hell are they gonna know?

reckon it wil be a case of name and address, like when you buy a TV,,, "but its a present mr man" i dont know the address..

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so what's the minimum qualification or certification you need to be able to do electrical jobs?

i suppose in a few years i wont be able to plaster either, just in case my mixtures not quite right!

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communist dictator britain here we come!

just been reading up on about this on the NICEIC web site. its to cut down on deaths from dodgy installations, and then they say that on average there is 19 deaths a year!! pah!

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an explanation !

Cutting corners on electrical work is plain dangerous - and from 1 January 2005 it'll be breaking the law too, according to the UK's leading electrical safety body, the NICEIC. The new electrical safety law - entitled Part P - aims to tighten up electrical safety in the home by clamping down on cowboy electricians and on homeowners doing DIY electrical work. The law will require that all electrical work in homes be carried out by a 'competent' person, such as an electrician registered with the NICEIC.

Despite the fact that faulty electrics result in 19 deaths and over 2,000 non-fatal electric shock accidents each year, until now electrical installations have not been subject to Building Regulations, so employing competent contractors for all electrical work has been left to the common sense of the homeowner.

"This new electrical safety requirement is long overdue - we're delighted that the law will now demand that homeowners and occupants employ only government-authorised electricians for electrical work and don't embark on DIY electrics," said Jim Speirs, director general of the National Inspection Council for Electrical Installation Contracting (NICEIC).

The electrical safety law will be included in the Building Regulations for England and Wales, and requires any persons carrying out work on fixed electrical installations in the home - such as sockets, switches, fuse boxes and ceiling fittings - to follow the fundamental principles of BS 7671, the British Standard for electrical installations.

New law spells end to DIY electrics and cowboy electricians

Don't let cowboy electricians put your life at risk - the NICEIC already has a roll of Approved Electrical Contractors, you can find one in your area by visiting www.niceic.org.uk or call the NICEIC on 0870 013 0381. Ends Notes to editors: The NICEIC is an independent, non-profit making body, with a register of electrical contractors that meet its rules, and Governmental controls on technical standards. It is for this reason, and because all electrical contractors are periodically assessed by one of its 60 area engineers, that the NICEIC symbol is one that you can trust. NICEIC electrical contractors are identified by the symbol accompanying their advertisements in directories and local papers, and on company stationery and vehicles.

Further information on Part P What is Part P?

Part P is a brand new part of the Building Regulations for England and Wales. It comes into effect on 1 January 2005, and brings all electrical installation work in dwellings into a 'controlled service' under the Building Regulations. This means that, for the first time, the technical standard of electrical installation work in dwellings (generally houses and flats) will be subject to statutory requirements. These requirements will apply not only to new construction, but also to any alterations or additions to existing installations, including full or partial rewires.

What is the purpose of Part P?

The law, which applies to electrical installation work in dwellings and connected gardens, greenhouses and outbuildings, is expected to raise the competence of electrical installers, and significantly reduce the number of deaths, injuries and fires caused by defective electrical installations.

How will it be enforced?

Part P will be enforced by Local Authorities and failure to comply will be a legal offence.

How will this affect me?

When the time comes to sell your property, your purchaser's solicitors will ask for evidence that any electrical installation carried out after 1 January 2005 complies with the new Building Regulations. There will be two ways to prove compliance:

1. A certificate showing that the work has been done by a government - authorised electrical contractor, such as an NICEIC contractor.

2. A certificate from the local authority saying that the installation has approval under the Building Regulations.

qualifications required

These are the the main requirements for the NICEIC Domestic Installer Scheme:

Applicants that can readily demonstrate that they meet the requirements of the NICEIC Domestic Installer Scheme, particularly the ability to install, inspect, test and certify their work in accordance with BS 7671, and to comply with the relevant Building Regulations, will be able to gain registration within a matter of weeks.

Applicants that cannot initially demonstrate that they meet all the scheme requirements will be given every assistance in meeting the outstanding requirements as quickly and painlessly as possible. Such assistance will include the provision of comprehensive technical information and guidance (covered by the application fee), including the IEE On-Site Guide, the NICEIC Inspection, Testing and Certification Book, a pad of electrical installation certificates, guidance on compliance with the Building Regulations, relevant HSE guidance, and the NICEIC Technical Manual. Information and guidance will also be provided about any additional training that proposed Qualified Supervisors should have.

• Competence in designing, installing, inspecting, testing and certifying domestic electrical work in accordance with BS 7671 (the IEE Wiring Regulations)

• Compliance with the relevant Building Regulations

Persons proposed as Qualified Supervisors, who must be a full-time principal or employee of the business, and have at least a City & Guilds 2381 qualification or equivalent. (See below for equivalent qualifications)

Other qualifications that will satisfy this requirement are:

Domestic Electrical Installer Qualification - (National Accredited Qualification)*

City & Guilds 2380 (16th Edition) Certificate

City and Guilds 2400 – (Design, Erection and Verifications of Electrical Installations)

City & Guilds 2360 Part 2 (Electrical Installation Competencies) awarded in 1993 or later

NVQ/SVQ level 3 in Electrical Installation work awarded in 1993 or later

The Scottish Qualification Authority Tailored Award in Design and Verification of Electrical Installation

• At least £2 million Public Liability insurance cover

• Customers must be offered a warranty

there you have it

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a bit more info:

Electrical Regulations from 1st January 2005

LABC Logo

Important notice for all householders;

* From 1st January 2005 you will need Building Regulation permission for any electrical work in your home or garden.

* This means that all electrical work must be installed by a competent person or electrician.

* Work must have a certificate of compliance as per the Electrical Regulations or Building Regulations (BS7671)

* The aim of this new requirement is to reduce deaths caused by defective electrical installations.

Remember you will be breaking the law if you do not obtain the relevant approval or certification for installations.

You will also be asked to supply evidence of satisfactory installation when selling or mortgaging the house if you own it.

EXCEPTIONS - Electrical work that does not need building regulation approval:

* Work connected to a 13A plug

* Certain minor works such as replacement of sockets, switches or roses

* Minor replacement of one cable

* Adding lighting points or socket to existing circuits providing not in a bathroom, kitchen, sauna, pools, gardens etc.

How to get Building Regulation approval:

* If the work is carried out by a “registered installer” (see below), they will certify that it complies with Building Regulations and notify the Council, you will not have to approach the Council yourself. There is no fee to the Council if you choose to use a “registered installer”.

* If you do not use a “registered installer” you must obtain Building Regulation approval for the work.

* You can choose to use a competent electrician who is not a “registered installer” but who does have all the necessary training and experience to carry out the work. If such a person can demonstrate their competence to the Council's Building Control Service then they will be granted Building Regulation approval from the Council for work carried out on your behalf. However, if you choose to use such an accepted competent electrician then a fee of £58.75 (inc VAT) will be charged by the Council.

* If you feel experienced enough, you can carry out the work yourself but do not cover any work up before you have made a Building Regulation approval application or before the Council's inspectors give their approval or the work will not be accepted. Be warned, if you choose to do the work yourself then a fee of between £117.50 and £293.00 (inc VAT) will be charged by the Council depending on scope of the work.

A fee will be charged by the Council.

The fee charged will vary according to the route you choose:

* Using a registered installer - no fee to council

* Using a accepted competent electrician £ 58.75 (inc VAT)

* DIY or not using an accepted competent electrician between £117.50 and £293.00 (inc VAT) depending on scope of the work.

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another tax to the home owner is seems,,

yeh i own my home, yeh i pay the council tax, rates etc, and now i need to pay money possible to the concil, but deffo to someone else to do work that one can do ones self..

yet you can accept the risk of death standing on a ladder, changing a fuse / lightbulb, smoking drinking.. but not the risk of this type of work..

think is, any reasonable person would think, yes i can do that , or no i cant do that, if i cant then i'll get someone else to do it..

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Madness!

So say for example, I do a bit of electrical work on my house... then try to sell it... buyer's solicitor asks for an installation certificate that I can't provide... etc.

Does this mean that aswell as not being able to sell my house, I should be sent to prison? Could the buyer shop me to the coppers?!!

Surely it would be just cheaper to have an electrical safety survey done by the prospective buyer - if there's anything unsafe then it can be included in items to be fixed before the sale.

Next they'll be saying that it's illegal to have long grass or untrimmed bushes!!

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