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i am very sceptical over the DIY kits TBH, best to get it done properly rather than take any risk in cocking up the system ie how do you know how much to put in? each system is different so pressures will vary, came across this also when looking into these DIY kits:

"Beware DIY Air Con Top Up Kits

Industry sources have reacted with concern to the news that Halfords is selling canisters of refrigerant direct to the public. The company sees an attractive market opportunity with the DIY kits offering a much cheaper alternative to the average garage service at anywhere between £80 - £200. Some kits claim to repair small leaks with the inclusion of a sealant in the mix, on the 'Radweld' principle. The Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Industry Board is taking the issue up directly with Halfords stressing the obvious environmental and safety implications and that they could be contravening the Environmental Protection Act. They stated, work on car ac systems should only be carried out by people trained in the handling of refrigerants. The move by Halfords serves to underline the need for a mandatory registration scheme for refrigerant handling. "

I would rather pay the bit extra and get it done properly.

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Sudesh.

It comes with a pressure gauge to stop you over filling which is attached to an air line type hose. This connects to your air con pipe in the same way as a tyre valve connects. You run the engine with the Air con on and squeeze the trigger until the correct amount is added.

If you have an older Lex like me then maybe you would take the, "risk".

If mine didn't work then I would have just lived with it and used the MX5 instead.

Fluff.

Define properly? This procedure has been around for years. How do you know how the garage you send it to does it?

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Sudesh.

It comes with a pressure gauge to stop you over filling which is attached to an air line type hose. This connects to your air con pipe in the same way as a tyre valve connects. You run the engine with the Air con on and squeeze the trigger until the correct amount is added.

If you have an older Lex like me then maybe you would take the, "risk".

If mine didn't work then I would have just lived with it and used the MX5 instead.

Fluff.

Define properly? This procedure has been around for years. How do you know how the garage you send it to does it?

Hi

What pressure do you set it at for mk1 gs300 ??

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properly?? how about using correct equipment for a start.

from the small amount i know about refrigeration AC systems, the pressure isnt the same in all of them, so is there a reference sheet with the kit?

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RR,

My car is a MK1 300 Sport and I wouldnt mind trying your method because at the end of the day, I have learned to live without ac for a while now, and if it was a simple fix like what you did then its got to be worth a try!! What do I need to buy to do this?

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This is what I used. http://www.coolproducts.info/

Im not endorsing it but it worked for me.

Fluff.

I understand your concern.

I am merely posting a comment about how I fixed my air con without using one of the specialists. Im not recomending it.

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This is what I used. http://www.coolproducts.info/

Im not endorsing it but it worked for me.

Fluff.

I understand your concern.

I am merely posting a comment about how I fixed my air con without using one of the specialists. Im not recomending it.

Hi all looooong time !

Thanks for sharing that with us mate im sure it will be usefull to a few, I suppose I would have tried it having the MK1 myself and specially if I was not intending on getting it charged anyway, cant loose really if things go wrong then theres always claimsdirect lol

Makes me wonder if the "expert" is the one that broke it as he must have put a lot of the pressure on the seals, blooming next day I was dying for the A/C on the motorway as it was boiling ! A little embaressing really considering my Civic Vti was pumping out freezing cold air !

Having said that though I got mine recharged by a specialist for £50 and he actually put a little too much in and it kept stalling the compressor so he took some out again (gas expands in the heat remember that guys so if your going to diy put a lot less in then you would have) anyway after all that it was leaking you could hear tssssssssssssing along, I can take it back as the dye he put in will show where the leak is and a free re-charge but may just fix it myself after he diagnoses it cant be more then a seal.

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The reason most systems stop working or don't work as well as they should is low pressure, just adding a can is unlikely to over pressurise the system. A lot of vehicles have the pressure and weight of refrigerant on a label somewhere.

I was getting a car MOTed yesterday and one of the yoff's employed to bugger up customers cars was recharging a system. I had to walk away in the end, I couldn't bear to watch any longer.

A WORD OF WARNING anyone thinking of trying the Halfords method ( and I would ) wear protective gogles refrigerant can freeze your eyes.

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Thanks for the halfords tip........got one of the cans....refilled the air-con, and it really is that simple!!! Now icy cold again..for less than £40 inc. a free air-con system cleanser...

WELL PLEASED..would recommend anyone try it....safe to do, measured, and very easy..

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 1 month later...

I also bought the halfords fillup thingy, very easy to do imho

unscrew the L grey cap from near bulkhead connect it together, little needle moved to tell you how much/little you have in keep adding till it tells you to stop, thats about it ,

so my black gs instead of being like driving a mobile oven, is actually bloody cold :)

Steve

ahh AC

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Thanks for pointer re: L cap near bulkhead Ryo. Did mine last night and worked fine.

Quite invaluable as in another post on here somewhere I saw mentioned that the H cap with the sight glass was the fill point.

From the instructions on the can, your post re: L cap and the other H cap I managed to work out at last mionute that one was prob high pressure side and the other side low.

Think I might need another can though.

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i am very sceptical over the DIY kits TBH, best to get it done properly rather than take any risk in cocking up the system ie how do you know how much to put in? each system is different so pressures will vary, came across this also when looking into these DIY kits:

"Beware DIY Air Con Top Up Kits

Industry sources have reacted with concern to the news that Halfords is selling canisters of refrigerant direct to the public. The company sees an attractive market opportunity with the DIY kits offering a much cheaper alternative to the average garage service at anywhere between £80 - £200. Some kits claim to repair small leaks with the inclusion of a sealant in the mix, on the 'Radweld' principle. The Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Industry Board is taking the issue up directly with Halfords stressing the obvious environmental and safety implications and that they could be contravening the Environmental Protection Act. They stated, work on car ac systems should only be carried out by people trained in the handling of refrigerants. The move by Halfords serves to underline the need for a mandatory registration scheme for refrigerant handling. "

I would rather pay the bit extra and get it done properly.

Not surprising that these so-called "specialists" put about scare stories.

They're just trying to protect their income, derived in many cases, by charging extortionate amounts, for what is basically no more difficult a job, than pumping up a tyre.

bill

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With mine I think it was empty to begin with. It slowly increased in pressure and made it to the end of the low pressure band, not quite into the "ok" pressure band. Air con now fine.

Can't hear or see any leaks but I won't buy another cann until I see how this charge lasts.

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  • 3 weeks later...

the stuff you get from halfords is just like rad weld for ac systems.The reson the industry tells you not to use it is because it garbage.If your ac has lost it gas it will also have lost oil for the compressor,correct me if i am wrong i dont think that stuff has oil in aswell.Also if you ever have to take to car to be done properly and you tell the garage whats in there the garage will not hook up the machine as thestuff that seals the leak gets in to the machine and ruins it like it did to ours.The stuff you get from halfords doesnt remove any moisture from the system so it could freeze in side and destoy your compressor.There are many other resons why this garbage should not be used.It wont be long before its banned due the laws requied for handling such gasses.The only way to recharge an ac system is with the right equipment.For an extra £40 to have it done properly there is no point in wasting your money.I have to ask would you skimp a few quid on some cheap nasty engine oil for your your pride and joy?I dont think you would.

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