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Bazza

Oil Cooler

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a few pondering questions for the clever ones amongst us

with an oil cooler fitted

the oil is diverted around the cooler

the diverted oil is therefore missing from the engine

so should the level of oil be increased to allow this detour ?

if so, by how much

what happens when its not being diverted through the cooling system ?

would the engine then be overfilled

or am i missing some information :huh:

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dont know for a fact mate sure some one will put me right if i am wrong

what i am thinking when you fit a oil cooler i suppose just like fitting a new oil filter so the first start fill the pipes and the cooler leave running for 30 seconds then topup as you need it all becomes as one and there is always oil in the cooler to circulate at all times :)

thats my thoughts anyway

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but does the oil in the cooler system not drain out into the engine when its turned off

and then when started the engine would have too much oil

with a thermostatic divertor, surely it would be open when the engines hot , but then close when the engine is cold

;)

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now i am not sure is there not some sort of non return valve in between ??

dont you get a adapter to the oil filter to connect the whole thing up ??

does the oil in the oil filter return back to the sump ??

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an adaptor replaces the original oil filter position

the filter then gets relocated via pipework

with further pipework linking to the cooler

i presumed it all drained down to the sump

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The Sandwich plate has a thermostat built in, thermostats alow 10% of the total flow to pass through the cooler when its closed.. when the thermostat reaches its temp, it opens and allows the oil to flow through the filter then the cooler and back into the engine, with the thermostat closed 90% of the oil just goes its normal path through the filter.

I found i needed a tiny bit more oil that normal.

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The Sandwich plate has a thermostat built in, thermostats alow 10% of the total flow to pass through the cooler when its closed.. when the thermostat reaches its temp, it opens and allows the oil to flow through the filter then the cooler and back into the engine, with the thermostat closed 90% of the oil just goes its normal path through the filter.

I found i needed a tiny bit more oil that normal.

only a tiny bit of oil

i imagined it would be a fair bit ....1litre ish

what sort of reduction in temps did you find

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it took 0.5ltr more in mine.

Can't say on oil temp, don't have a gauge to show me that. (until of course the Power FC is in :) )

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not sure why your getting tied up in knots...

as has been stated, fill the engine with oil...run it for a few moments, check level

continue till level stays at correct point, the oil wont drain back into the sump, especially if the cooler is mounted with the inlet outlet at the top

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A new oil cooler should be primed with oil when first installed (to prevent pockets of air when the thermostat opens). Most coolers are mounted fairly low and with the connections on the top of the radiator (which prevents the oil draining back to the sump). Theoretically the entire oil system will require an increase in capacity equal to the addition of volume of the oil cooler and lines etc.

Because the oil doesn't normally drain back, the normal level indicator on the dip stick should be sufficient.

A good question - well asked Barrie :)

Another point to note is this: Just because an oil cooler is installed does not mean that it is effective. We recently saw an is200 (turbocharged) with an oil cooler fitted that was showing 120 degrees (the owner wasn't aware of this until meters were subsequebntly installed). The problem was that the radiator was too small (around half the size that we use for the same application).

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