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Boeing 797 Take A Look


Paul Reece
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BOEING 797

Will not be long before we will be sitting in the wing with vista views.

Look at this new aircraft...guess we are not going to be outdone by the French A380. Boeing to take on Airbus with (1000 seat) giant 797 Blended Wing plane.

Boeing is preparing a 1000 passenger jet that could reshape the Air travel industry for the next 100 years. The radical Blended Wing design has been developed by Boeing in cooperation with the NASA Langley Research Center . The mammoth plane will have a wing span of 265 feet compared to the 747's 211 feet, and is designed to fit within the newly created terminals used for the 555 seat Airbus A380, which is 262 feet wide.

The new 797 is in direct response to the Airbus A380 which has racked up 159 orders, but has not yet flown any passengers. Boeing decide to kill its 747X stretched super jumbo in 2003 after little interest was shown by airline companies, but has continued to develop the ultimate Airbus crusher 797 for years at its Phantom Works research facility in Long Beach, Calif.

The Airbus A380 has been in the works since 1999 and has accumulated $13 billion in development costs, which gives Boeing a huge advantage now that Airbus has committed to the older style tubular aircraft for decades to come.!

There are several big advantages to the blended wing design, the most important being the lift to drag ratio which is expected to increase by an amazing 50%, with overall weight reduced by 25%, making it an estimated 33% more efficient than the A380, and making Airbus's $13 billion dollar investment look pretty shaky.

High body rigidity is another key factor in blended wing aircraft, It reduces turbulence and creates less stress on the air frame which adds to efficiency, giving the 797 a tremendous 8800 nautical mile range with its 1000 passengers flying comfortably at mach 88 or 654 mph (+-1046km/h) cruising speed another advantage over the Airbus tube-and-wing designed A380's 570 mph (912 km/h).

The exact date for introduction is unclear, yet the battle lines are clearly drawn in the high-stakes war for civilian air supremacy.

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i bet its business and first class that sit upfront and get the vista views.

of course.......... one thing that does surprise me is that the people with the cheapest tickets expect or demand the most items/best service, sure it would be nice but its normally a case of " sit down, shut up and dont complain"

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i bet its business and first class that sit upfront and get the vista views.

of course.......... one thing that does surprise me is that the people with the cheapest tickets expect or demand the most items/best service, sure it would be nice but its normally a case of " sit down, shut up and dont complain"

I never expect that much when traveling economy.. but i wouldnt expect to be treated like that rob... if you ever become a billionaire rob please dont start your own airline :lol::lol:

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i bet its business and first class that sit upfront and get the vista views.

of course.......... one thing that does surprise me is that the people with the cheapest tickets expect or demand the most items/best service, sure it would be nice but its normally a case of " sit down, shut up and dont complain"

Only to true.....in every industry you get them! :D

Its a funny looking plane, like the idea of having a front view seat!

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It's a shame as that looks ace!

Just imagine what the view could be like from inside if they wired up loads of HD cameras along the wingspan and then used those to feed an image to a plasma wall along the front - it would be awesome!

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Yeah they've had that on the last few flights I've been on, just displayed on those tiny monitors on the back of the seat - imagine that in HD on a massive plasma wall - would be ace!

Might make a few people feel a bit queasy though :D

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I love these kind of aviation news stories....don't expect seeing anything like this in the air anytime within the next 20 years!! :lol:

Also Boeing haven't ditched the 747-X as the story tells...they have already published it as the 747-800 and it will be flying very soon!! They have quite a few orders in for it already too!!

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That's one fab looking air craft - a marvel of engineering.

I have a question for you aero guys please - is there any difference regarding the plane's dynamic performance between having the engines under the wings or at the tail? Is it a bit like the difference between and front and rear wheel drive cars :blink: ?

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Okay, I'm not sure whether anyone clicked on the link I posted earlier, but surely a quick look at the picture would persuade you that it's hardly legit. Look at the skyline in the background, it's like something out of Futurama.

This plane doesn't exist, folks.

Si

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Okay, I'm not sure whether anyone clicked on the link I posted earlier, but surely a quick look at the picture would persuade you that it's hardly legit. Look at the skyline in the background, it's like something out of Futurama.

This plane doesn't exist, folks.

Si

I think we gathered that mate but it looks like they are "developing" something like it

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That's one fab looking air craft - a marvel of engineering.

I have a question for you aero guys please - is there any difference regarding the plane's dynamic performance between having the engines under the wings or at the tail? Is it a bit like the difference between and front and rear wheel drive cars :blink: ?

I don't think so really. Planes basically balance and the centre of rotation is about where the main wings are. Planes with their engines at the back (MD11, BAC111 for example) have their wings further back along the fuselage so the extra weight of the engines at the rear is accounted for by extra mass in front of the wings. It is for this balancing reason that flights that are half empty still have passengers seated all along the length of the plane rather than in the nicer seats up front. Fuel is also pumped between tanks to maintain an even weight, and passenger luggage and cargo is carefully loaded to take account of the weight of each container.

Some planes (the Tristar, and Trident 3 for example) have 3 engines, two under the wings and one mounted at the base of the tailfin, but these have got rarer since planes with only 2 engines were allowed to cross the Atlantic.* At the same time, modern turbofan engines have got massively more powerful, more fuel-efficient and quieter so most new aircraft only need 2 unless they are very large and heavy planes.

One other point regarding the positioning of the engines on that plane (taking into account the military development model the fake was apparently based on) is that if you have the engines on top of the aircraft then the red-hot exhaust gas is a little less visible from the ground, helping to reduce the heat signature of the plane and thus visibility to heat-seeking missiles. The cold air rushing over the wings can be blended with the exhaust before it rushes over the back of the plane.

* Technically this was to do with how far they were allowed to fly from land, rather than the Atlantic as such. Engine failures are now so rare this rule was relaxed.

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That's one fab looking air craft - a marvel of engineering.

I have a question for you aero guys please - is there any difference regarding the plane's dynamic performance between having the engines under the wings or at the tail? Is it a bit like the difference between and front and rear wheel drive cars :blink: ?

I don't think so really. Planes basically balance and the centre of rotation is about where the main wings are. Planes with their engines at the back (MD11, BAC111 for example) have their wings further back along the fuselage so the extra weight of the engines at the rear is accounted for by extra mass in front of the wings. It is for this balancing reason that flights that are half empty still have passengers seated all along the length of the plane rather than in the nicer seats up front. Fuel is also pumped between tanks to maintain an even weight, and passenger luggage and cargo is carefully loaded to take account of the weight of each container.

Some planes (the Tristar, and Trident 3 for example) have 3 engines, two under the wings and one mounted at the base of the tailfin, but these have got rarer since planes with only 2 engines were allowed to cross the Atlantic.* At the same time, modern turbofan engines have got massively more powerful, more fuel-efficient and quieter so most new aircraft only need 2 unless they are very large and heavy planes.

One other point regarding the positioning of the engines on that plane (taking into account the military development model the fake was apparently based on) is that if you have the engines on top of the aircraft then the red-hot exhaust gas is a little less visible from the ground, helping to reduce the heat signature of the plane and thus visibility to heat-seeking missiles. The cold air rushing over the wings can be blended with the exhaust before it rushes over the back of the plane.

* Technically this was to do with how far they were allowed to fly from land, rather than the Atlantic as such. Engine failures are now so rare this rule was relaxed.

Thanks very much Mike B :)

It never really occured to me before to ask if the propulsion unit location had an effect on in-flight handling.

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I was on a Boeing (something or other ) 700 series that had pointy up wing tips like in the picture in the first post.

Does anyone know why the tips point up? Is it for economy or dynamic stability or something else please?

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