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Caliper Painting


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Sorry to start a new topic on caliper painting as it's been discussed so much, but can't seem to find answers to two questions:

1. What exactly is degreasing? (Is it just cleaning the calipers with a household cleaner like fairy, or something more involved?)

2. I'm considering using a fine grinding tool on my Black & Decker Wizard (Dremel type tool) to smooth off the face of the caliper before painting:

Is this a good or bad idea?

Once the face is smooth, will the caliper need to be primed before painting or will hammerite still stick properly to the smooth surface?

Hoping to paint this weekend or next if the weather's good so any help is much appreciated :)

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I never degreased mine before painting them, but i did wire brush the crap off them and wiped the copper grease from the section that would be painted.

With regards smoothing the surface, its unnecessary as the Hammerite is kind of self smoothing, and no it doesn't need priming either.

I would recommend lacquering once you've painted them (whether you put a little Lexus vinyl on them or not) as it gives a great finish compared to the matt finish of just Hammerite.

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Corsa is right A good wire brushing. Clean off dust, give it a wipe with white spirit or similar to get rid of any dust grit or grease.

Apply Hammerite.

You can go down the route you mention with the B&D grinder but it is not really that neccessary. Depends how long you wish to spend on them. Hammerite will stick to most anything. Add your "LEXUS" logo add a coat of clear laquer and your done.

Keep saying that I will redo mine.

Next time the wife needs a little job doing I shall tell her that "HER" safety is foremost in my mind and that the brakes need doing as prepping and painting the calipers is a safety measure :shifty:

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B)-->

QUOTE(T7RY B @ Jun 26 2007, 12:51 PM)
Keep saying that I will redo mine.

Next time the wife needs a little job doing I shall tell her that "HER" safety is foremost in my mind and that the brakes need doing as prepping and painting the calipers is a safety measure :shifty:

not sure if thats devious, or genius. or would it be both in this instance!? any which way, its worth the time as rusty, dirty looking calipers should only be found on a car in a scrap yard, or the 'cars under £500' in the auto trader :lol:

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B)-->

QUOTE(T7RY B @ Jun 26 2007, 12:51 PM)
Keep saying that I will redo mine.

Woah woah woah woah woah!! hold up!!

redo!! ?

i wanted to get mine done, but i wont be if it means its something else to look after and maintain...

is it not just a one job wonder? will i have to look after it?

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Woah woah woah woah woah!! hold up!!

redo!! ?

i wanted to get mine done, but i wont be if it means its something else to look after and maintain...

is it not just a one job wonder? will i have to look after it?

Don't panic :lol:

Its a pretty quick job & once done properly they should stay looking good and maintainance free for ages, the only thing you may need to do occasionally is touch up where you may get the odd stone chip

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i think prep is key to a good finnish on this.

when i did mite i just gave them a good wire brushing, then a good wash with some soapy water and white spirit (being careful not to get it on discs!). once dry i simply applied a coat (not too thick) of hammerite smoothe paint, then when dry applied another.

seriously if i can do it anyone should be able too.

been done about 2 years not and there still as good as when first done after a good wash.

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Woah woah woah woah woah!! hold up!!

redo!! ?

i wanted to get mine done, but i wont be if it means its something else to look after and maintain...

is it not just a one job wonder? will i have to look after it?

Don't panic :lol:

Its a pretty quick job & once done properly they should stay looking good and maintainance free for ages, the only thing you may need to do occasionally is touch up where you may get the odd stone chip

As Janey say's mine only need to be "redone" because they have lasted two and a half years and have a few chips on them. Probably still looking better than they did out of the factory. So don't panic it's not like they will have to be done every 6 months

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If I use a wire brush on the end of a drill will that be too aggressive?

Just a good brushing by hand to get off any dust etc will do the job ok :)

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  • 1 month later...

Can't believe I started this thread back in June and only getting round to it now! (I'll leave it to your imagination as to whether I'm really busy or just lazy :shifty: )

Anyway, few quick questions:

1: Is 3 coats of the hammerite too excessive? How many do people normally put on there?

2: How long do you need to leave between coats? (Main reason is I'm doing this off the standard jack, so only one wheel at a time)

3: How long will I need to leave the car alone once finished before I can use it again? I don't want to find I've got a load of brake dust embedded in my freshly painted calipers!

Thanks for help so far, Jamie's link in particular was very useful (P.S. have you had your alloys refurbed? Like the dark grey against the silver of the calipers!)

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Can't believe I started this thread back in June and only getting round to it now! (I'll leave it to your imagination as to whether I'm really busy or just lazy :shifty: )

Anyway, few quick questions:

1: Is 3 coats of the hammerite too excessive? How many do people normally put on there?

2: How long do you need to leave between coats? (Main reason is I'm doing this off the standard jack, so only one wheel at a time)

3: How long will I need to leave the car alone once finished before I can use it again? I don't want to find I've got a load of brake dust embedded in my freshly painted calipers!

Thanks for help so far, Jamie's link in particular was very useful (P.S. have you had your alloys refurbed? Like the dark grey against the silver of the calipers!)

1. Yes three is too excessive, two is enough.

2. Depends on weather. I left about an hour or so between mine - but then it was baking hot. For safety leave a few hours

3. Ideally 24 hours to let them dry fully. They'll take a few days to properly cure but you can use them - well I did mine and they're fine.

It's really so easy to do, and such a huge improvement.

Keith

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