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What Is It?


_Richie_
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Thanks Stevie

WIKI says :

A resonator is a device or system that exhibits resonance or resonant behavior, that is, it naturally oscillates at some frequencies, called its resonance frequencies, with greater amplitude than at others. Although its usage has broadened, the term usually refers to a physical object that oscillates at specific frequencies because its dimensions are an integral multiple of the wavelength at those frequencies. The oscillations or waves in a resonator can be either electromagnetic or mechanical (including acoustic). Resonators are used to either generate waves of specific frequencies or to select specific frequencies from a signal. Musical instruments use acoustic resonators that produce sound waves of specific tones.

A cavity resonator, usually used in reference to electromagnetic resonators, is one in which the waves exist in a hollow space inside the device. Acoustic cavity resonators, in which sound is produced by air vibrating in a cavity with one opening, are known as Helmholtz resonators.

Interesting :blink:

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Thanks Stevie

WIKI says :

A resonator is a device or system that exhibits resonance or resonant behavior, that is, it naturally oscillates at some frequencies, called its resonance frequencies, with greater amplitude than at others. Although its usage has broadened, the term usually refers to a physical object that oscillates at specific frequencies because its dimensions are an integral multiple of the wavelength at those frequencies. The oscillations or waves in a resonator can be either electromagnetic or mechanical (including acoustic). Resonators are used to either generate waves of specific frequencies or to select specific frequencies from a signal. Musical instruments use acoustic resonators that produce sound waves of specific tones.

A cavity resonator, usually used in reference to electromagnetic resonators, is one in which the waves exist in a hollow space inside the device. Acoustic cavity resonators, in which sound is produced by air vibrating in a cavity with one opening, are known as Helmholtz resonators.

Interesting :blink:

Eh ? :whistling:

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Got something similar on my 3 litre Sport Cross and am considering blanking it off first and if there's not reduction in power or vast increase in intake noise, getting rid of it. Here's why...

Got a book for Christmas called 4 stroke engine performance tuning. Slowly reading it and the first aspects it covers is air intake. basically it says keep the air as cold as you can and the intake pipe as smooth as you can ..that's about 20 pages condensed into half a sentance.

On the 3ltr the intake runs right across the exposed exhaust manifold - so, I'm going to shield those and make the existing black plastic as smooth as etc. ie remove the resonator

I'm not sure if there will be any noticeable gains as they tend to be at the top end, but it's a cheap 'mod' and it's fun.

Cheers

Jack

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There's one on the IS 250 OEM intake as well, but it's not part of the Lexus 'F' Sport intake or any non-OEM sports intakes. If you want to keep it quiet at the expense of disrupting the incoming airflow then leave it on. With the standard intake, blanking it off may give you a tiny improvement, but not really worth the effort.

Here's the 250 OEM (LHD)with resonator and the non-OEM (RHD)without

250enguncovqn2.jpg 28062008013jm7.jpg

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lol...I did a thread a while back regarding the resonator on my car as it broke off, probably due to the impact in the accident. Anyway, the resonators arent really attached that well to the intake itself but when it was missing on mine I didnt notice any difference in noise. I changed the intake on my car after I got it back from the bodyshop and didnt notice any difference either. The resonator is basically there in order to reduce induction noise and some people remove them on cars in order to increase the noise. I dont see the point of removing it on the IS200 as it leaves a large hole which would be difficult to seal.

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