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  1. 5 points
    If your like me, the best part about owning a Lexus is the nice toys and technology that Lexus offer. I've recently swapped my IS220D SE-L for a IS250 SE, The SE-L was fitted with the illuminated door sills that light up "Lexus" when you open the doors, a really nice feature which should be standard in my opinion. Unfortunately my 250 SE only had the basic plastic sills that look a bit cheap on a Luxury car so i pulled off the plastic ones to find that the cars are fitted as standard with the plug for the illuminated sills, so I thought I could just buy the illuminated sills and plug them in. Unfortunately it turned out that this is not the case, all the cars do indeed have the plug however the plug is only wired in on the Luxury and sports spec models, to get around this problem you need to do some basic home wiring which I will show you now. Please note: I take no responsibility for any damage done to your vehicle while following this guide. For this modification you will need the following: 1-2M of Auto Wire 4x Scotch Locks A Pair of Bull Nose Pliers A Pair of Snips Stanley Knife/Craft knife Step 1: Remove the existing door sills to reveal the wiring loom underneath ( A bit of brute force pulling straight up will remove the sills) Step 2: Using a Stanley Knife or Craft knife, carefully cut away the electrical tape that covers the wires that go into the door sill connector (Be particularly careful not to cut into any wires in the loom). Step 3: Take your Auto Wire and 1 scotch lock and Scotch lock your auto wire and the White wire going into the Door Sill Connector together (Leave the blue wire as it is). Step 4: Remove the interior trim that covers the seat belt tensioner system (to aid this process put the seat in the fully back position and the backrest all the way back, and open the rear door. Again some force will release the clips holding the panel on). Step 5: Locate the wire that connects to the Door switch, it sits on the inside of the pillar behind the switch. (A White Wire on the drivers side and Purple on the Passengers side, shown in the image above). Step 6: Trace your auto wire around the current loom to reach the Door Switch wire behind the seat belt panel. (when doing this ensure that your auto wire cannot rub on the seat belt as it moves back and forth during use). Step 7: Take a Scotch lock and scotch lock the Door Switch wire and auto wire together (Ensure you don't short out the wire on the vehicle's body work while using metal tools. I also wrapped some electrical tape around the scotch lock to ensure nothing metal would contact the bodywork in the future). Step 8: Plug in your illuminated door sills to ensure they are working correctly, when you push the Door switch the Sills should shut off and then light up when the switch is released. (If your Sills don't light up please check to see if you have your interior light switch set to come on when the doors open). Step 9: When you are happy that everything is working correctly, push the interior trim panels back into place. Some pressure on the areas should clip everything back in to place. Finished Product. I hope this guide was helpful, if i've missed anything or you have any questions please post here and I will endeavour to help the best I can.
  2. 4 points
    I purchased a plastic grille from ebay Item http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/270757461757 or search for 06 07 08 Lexus IS250 IS350 IS-F Style Grill Grille NEW Before : After grille.pdf
  3. 4 points
    After a year running my 2007 Lexus IS250 SE-L, I thought I would share my experiences. After all, a year is certainly a decent amount of time to get a real sense of what it’s like to own a particular car and is of course a world away from a quick test drive at the local dealer! A bit of background. My IS250 was purchased as an approved used Lexus from a Lexus main dealer to serve as a more sensible and family friendly replacement to my previous car - a three door Focus ST3, as my wife and I had a baby on the way. You could argue that the IS250 wasn’t the most obvious choice for a family friendly car, but MPV’s really aren’t my thing and after coming from the ST, I wanted to maintain at least a pinch of sportiness, and the vast array of Lexus gadgets impressed me. Once I’d decided on the IS250, it was simply a case of hunting down the right one, and of course it had to be the top spec SE-L version with multimedia package - because why not? With one of these, you really can’t moan about lack of gadgets. This thing really does have everything, at least for 2007. There’s leather electric, heated, air cooled memory seats as well as a reversing camera, auto dimming mirrors, dual zone climate control, xenons, cruise - I could go on forever. Some of the features are still rare to find even on new cars today, such as an electric rear blind and an electrically adjustable steering column that moves out the way when you get out. I guess the obvious place to start when talking about my experience when coming from the Focus ST is performance and driving. Clearly I wasn’t buying this expecting it to perform like the Focus ST, but with over 200 horses from its V6 petrol engine, I was at least hoping for some enjoyable performance and I can say it’s definitely delivered on that. The torque is the most noticeable difference with the IS250 being naturally aspirated rather than turbocharged, but the ability to hold on to the revs and listen to the V6 climb whilst the power builds definitely makes up for that. In terms of straight line speed it’s certainly not blisteringly fast, but it’s quick enough for most people. I may well have considered the IS350 had it been available in the UK, as apparently that’s quite quick, but overall I’m happy with the IS250. The six speed auto fitted to my car is an absolute joy. Whilst I’m quite a fan of a proper manual gearchange, the auto box really suits the character of the car. You can put it in drive and it will waft down the road incredibly smoothly, with a swift kick down when you plant your right foot. From what I’ve read the manual really doesn’t suit the IS250, plus you get stung with almost double the tax compared to the auto. Sport mode sharpens things up a little more and allows you to use the manual gearchange with paddles if you feel like it. I can’t say I bother with this too often if I’m honest and one major gripe I do have with this system is that it still does not give complete manual control. For example, if you have it in 4th gear at 30mph and put your foot down hard, the car is still likely to change down a gear or two. I’m not sure if it’s just me, but if I select manual mode, I want the car to be completely manual, not mostly manual. If I was being picky, I would also mention that I find the manual change a little less responsive than I hoped, although this is largely to be expected with a single clutch system as opposed to the more modern twin clutch systems you find in DSG boxes and the like. Ride wise I’ve been very impressed. The ride itself could easily be described as sublime, possibly helped by the fact that I’m running the standard 17 inch SE-L alloys rather than the optional 18’s, but it’s certainly a world away from low profile run flat tyres (cough BMW). Combine that with how quiet the cabin is and it really is a nice place to be. I find that even at motorway speeds you can have a proper conversation at a lower level than would be possible in other cars. Admittedly tyre choice can also be a factor (currently running Hankook Ventus V12 Evo 2) but it’s a testament to how well Lexus have done with sound insulation. I think the fact that the engine is just so quiet really helps too. Whilst cruising it’s almost impossible to hear the engine in the cabin, although it does come alive with a nice metallic V6 note when the revs start to climb. Rattles are almost non existent too, which is virtually unheard of on almost all cars that are nearly eight years old. I’ve actually had several comments from first time passengers about how smooth and quiet the experience is which is always nice! Throw the IS250 into a corner and while it’s far from a car that’s designed to be at home on a track it handles itself respectably. Whilst there is some body roll if you really push on (which I fully expected given the excellent ride), it’s fairly controlled and the level of grip is excellent. You can definitely feel the size of the car and it certainly feels like a saloon with a V6 tucked under the bonnet, but it does a fairly decent job of disguising its bulk most of the time and still feels fairly nimble for the type of car it is. Steering is fairly responsive and has a decent weight to it for an electric system. though naturally it can sometimes be devoid of some feel that purists tend to prefer with the old hydraulic systems that have all but phased out these days. Practicality was clearly going to be quite an interesting test for me with the arrival of a new baby, and the IS250 has been a bit of a mixed bag on this front. Whilst I accept that the traditional saloon layout is probably not the first choice when it comes to family cars these days, it has four doors and a decent sized boot so I wasn’t too worried. Speaking of the boot, it is a very good size that I’ve found happy to accommodate all of our gear most of the time. At 378 litres, it’s hardly the largest available, and of course the saloon style smaller opening is less practical than most hatchbacks for larger loads but that being said, it takes out medium/large Silver Cross pram with ease and still leaves plenty of room for the countless other baby related items we have to move around with us. There’s also a hatch that allows longer loads to be slotted through into the main cabin, providing of course that whatever you are putting in fits through the hatch. It was nice to see that the car also includes a space saver spare wheel, which whilst I thankfully have not had to use it yet, provides me with far greater reassurance than the now all too common pump/gunge combination. On top of the spare wheel well, a couple of nice trays that are under than main floor allow you to store small items too, which help to avoid them sliding around when your boot is empty. The issue of practicality brings me on to what is probably my biggest gripe when it comes to the IS250 - rear leg room. There simply is not enough space in the back of this car considering its saloon layout. If you’re of reasonable height or above (I’m 6ft), you will find that after adjusting your seat to get comfy, your seat will encroach far too much into the legroom of the passenger behind. This does not matter most of the time for me as we do not often carry a rear seat passenger behind me, but for the times you do it can almost become a little embarrassing trying to squeeze a friend or relative in behind you and asking them to have their legs crushed. If I were squeezing them into a 2+2 Porsche or something then I’m sure I would be forgiven but in a saloon? It comes across as if I’m adopting the “gangster lean” and selfishly positioning my seat too far back but this is not the case - I’ve actually moved it as far forward as I can stand. The transmission tunnel also gets in the way for occasional fifth seat passengers, although for most people this is forgiven as a fifth passenger is fairly rare. Also, for most petrol heads who prefer the rear wheel drive layout it will be a small sacrifice to make. The bigger issue when it came to the rear space for us initially, was how far forward the passenger seat had to go to allow the rear facing baby seat and Isofix base to fit in. Whilst it’s well known that the rear facing seats do take up quite a lot of room, the amount of legroom left in the front passenger seat was only just enough for me to sit in it without my legs touching the glove box so not brilliant. With my Wife in the passenger seat this was far less of a problem, and it’s now far better due to the fact that we have moved on to a forward facing seat. I must say the Isofix solution is very neat, with nice flaps in the leather to hide the brackets and a plastic cover over the top anchor point. This is far nicer than the solution I have seen on some other cars who often now seem to leave the nasty looking brackets exposed even when not in use. Running costs have been near enough as expected or even marginally better than I had anticipated for a V6 auto petrol. The tax is not as bad as it could be, currently sat at £290 per year rather than £500 per year for the manual version. Fuel consumption has actually been surprisingly reasonable for the type of car. Around town I typically see 25-28 mpg, but on a run is where this car really comes into its own. On steady motorway trips averaging 70-80 mph most of the way, it’s remarkably easy to end up on the nicer side of 40 mpg. I’ve actually touched 42 mpg on a couple of occasions. The car just seems to love motorway cruising and it’s a great car for this. The fact that it has a nice long sixth gear must help (80 mph is approximately 2500 rpm) but once you’ve taken into account the saving per litre on diesel, it’s not a million miles away from an average diesel saloon on the motorway, and personally I’d much rather have a nice petrol V6 to play with than a diesel. The smoothness and quietness of the engine combined with the comfort and surplus of gadgets make the Lexus a lovely place to spend time in during a longer motorway jaunt. I must say I find the seats excellent and even after a long drive down to Paris recently, my back felt absolutely fine at the other end and I could have happily got straight back in the car and done it again. I want to talk about the gadgets in this car a little more, but there’s simply so many I’d be here all day if I mentioned them all, so I’ll just take the time to talk about a few of my favourites. One of which (or several working together) is the memory seats. To some people, memory seats really don’t matter, but for me when my car has two drivers, it’s a really useful feature. It always takes me ages to get that seating position just right, particularly with the number of adjustments on the Lexus, so if I had to adjust it after every time the Wife drove it, I’d never get it quite right. The Lexus really does make it so easy too. The memory function not only covers the seats, but also the wing mirrors and steering wheel, meaning the only thing that you actually have to adjust manually is the rear view mirror. Not only this, but you can program a memory setting to the smart key for keyless entry, so all you have to do is touch the handle and open the door to unlock it and adjust all the settings to your liking. It’s just so convenient and I have no doubt that Lexus have saved me several hours in time over the last year from making all those adjustments. Now that summer is officially here, the air cooled seats also deserve a mention and are a great way of stopping you getting too sweaty as can often be the case when sitting in leather seats on a hot day. The multimedia package which would have been a £2700 option when the car was new is also a nice bit of kit. You get the fantastic Mark Levinson sound system with 14 speakers, which really is a treat for your ears. The sat nav is also surprisingly good (with the latest update disc) and has lane guidance, junction view and traffic information. There’s also an excellent rear view camera with moving guidelines, and the DVD playback is a nice toy to have but it could do with rear screens to allow viewing whilst driving as frankly, how often are you going to sit and watch a DVD with the handbrake on? I really like the LED lighting that Lexus has taken the time to implement both in and out of the car, particularly the front footwells that have a nice glow whilst driving at night and the faint white light that bathes the centre console looks pretty cool too. Another nice touch is the illuminated scuff plates that offer a welcome blue glow to front seat passengers. As I said, I could go on for some time about all the fantastic gadgets that this car has fitted to it, which is pretty amazing considering it is almost 8 years old now, so I’m going to have to cut it there. Let it be said though that if you do decide to pick up one of these, particularly in SE-L trim, you will not be disappointed by the gadgets on offer. If you like your toys, you will love the Lexus. That brings me nicely to reliability. The cynics among you would be quite happy to point out that with so many toys on the car there would be plenty to go wrong. Well, I’m happy to report that this has not been the case. To be fair, I’d done my research on these before buying so had a fair idea of what to expect. According to most reports on the Lexus Owners Club, the only things that often goes wrong are seizing rear callipers, leaking rear shock absorbers and corrosion on the alloy wheels. Luckily, as I purchased mine from a Lexus main dealer, I had the peace of mind of a Lexus approved used warranty, which almost offers the same level of protection you get from a new car. It was fortunate that I had this warranty, as I have experienced all of those common problems within the first year of ownership. Under warranty, I’ve had both rear shock absorbers replaced, along with one rear calliper (I guess the other one will be due eventually!) and both wing mirrors. The wing mirrors were replaced due to a faulty dipping function when you put the car in reverse, but I believe this feature is only on SE-L models and though useful is far from an essential. Still, the mirrors would have been about £600 each at retail level. With regards to the alloy wheels, they were refurbished when I purchased that car but are already showing signs of the corrosion coming back after just one year which is disappointing. They clearly weren’t stripped back to bare metal, and were perhaps just ‘blown over’. Sadly the wheels are not covered under warranty so I have been living with them for the time being and will have to get them done properly when they get worse. Aside from those few issues listed above, that’s been it. The car has been a breeze to live with and my Local Lexus dealer (Lexus Poole) has been second to none. This has been the first Lexus I have owned and hopefully not the last as the ownership experience has been as good for me as has been suggested by the various awards they have won for customer service. Everytime my Wife and I have visited, whether it be for a warranty claim, service or MOT, we’re treated exceptionally well. The staff are excellent and the level of customer care is superb - a real credit to the Lexus brand. Overall, I’ve been very peased with my Lexus IS250. It’s been a reliable, comfortable and enjoyable drive over the past year that has served me and my family well. It’s certainly not without its niggles (rear legroom probably being the biggest for me), but it’s made up for that in almost every other way and has given me a taste of the Lexus ownership experience. It’s been a good all round compromise as a family car and I hope I shall continue to enjoy it until the inevitable time comes to upgrade to something a little bigger! Find out more about the Lexus IS250: > Lexus IS250 Common Problems > Lexus IS250 Brochure > Lexus IS250 Accessories Guide (subject to availability)
  4. 4 points
    When you change the battery you MUST re-initialize each window in order to be able to control each from the drivers door switches. In order to do this you perform this operation at each window using the switch on the door for the window you are at. If you look closely at the small led on each switch you will se it is blinking - this indicates the windows need initializing. 1. Open the window halfway using the door switch. 2. Fully close the window by pulling the switch and continue to hold the switch up for 4 seconds or so. 3. Do this at each door. When complete the blinking will change to being a constant glow ie 'on'. Your windows will now fully function again from the driver's door control set.
  5. 4 points
    I did a spark plug change at 60k, following the usual pdf guide and thought I'd share some tips. Remember to disconnect the battery first. Note that doing so will cause a self check on the next start up and clear your MPG records. The first start also takes ~ 0.5 seconds longer, so hold the start button down else it may stall and you'll panic! The 5mm allen key you need has to be a long thin one, multi-tools & socket sets are no use here. Don't get the useless ones with a ball on the end. Use a pair of pliers / mole grips to gain leverage if necessary. The one closest to the firewall is the most difficult of all, so do that first, then the one in the centre so that they are under the least load (less torque to undo them). Have a nice strong magnet (old hard drives are great for these, or speakers) to hand to help draw bolts out (attach to screwdriver) so you don't drop them. Get some spare engine cover clips, plastic ages, and after 60k and several years in a hot engine bay you'll find some don't secure like they should. You also stand some chance of losing / breaking some if you don't have spares. A 10mm ring spanner is essential for removing the bolt on the side of the throttle body unless you want to be frustrated (sockets won't reach). Also make sure you have a good 10mm socket and 10mm long socket, same goes for 12mm. Always make sure you know which way loosens and which way tightens when working in awkward places. Removing the battery and the case completely it's in might seem fiddly, but the improved access to the bolt at the rear of the intake manifold makes it well worth your time. I've seen people report difficulty fitting that nut back, so even if you can get it out, don't anticipate getting it back in with the battery in place unless you have small hands and a lot of luck. The spark plugs are down a deep (20 cm?) hole, so your socket extension needs to be long enough for the job. 16mm magnetic spark plug socket is what I'd recommend. I use a Sealey AK654 as my torque wrench is 3/8" drive and recommend you get a name brand one rather than a Chinese no-name brand. Remember to put aside the wrench and use your fingers for everything but the loosening and final tightening - this helps to avoid cross threading. Play around with a new spark plug and the socket before you start work and you'll get a sense of how it fits together and how things should feel (since you can't see it in situ). The large jubilee clip on the air intake hose may need some jiggling to relax its grip once you have loosened it. You can tap the clip itself or wiggle the intake hose around. It won't take much force, but may take some patience if it's grimy. The passenger side rearmost spark plug has something grounded kind of in the way, loosen that to rotate it out of your way, it's torqued down very tight from the factory, so make sure it's gud'n'tite when you tighten it back up as well. The spark plug connector is easiest to loosen using a fine flat screwdriver rather than your thumb. Insert from the spark plug side (not the wire side) under the catch and gently release it by lifting that side up a mm. Undoing the 10mm nuts holding the plastic wire housing which routes to the spark plugs makes access much easier. Even if it's not obviously necessary. It's obvious how it goes back on, and you're not going to cross-wire your plugs without effort. What might you forget to do back up? The jubilee clip on the air intake; the clips which secure the vacumn hoses to the intake manifold; the bolt at the back that secures the intake manifold to the engine block; the nuts on the battery; the hose holders which help with routing and secure hoses to the intake manifold / air intake; the wire which connects to the air intake; the battery sensor on the side of the battery case. Overall the job is very easy if you use those tips. With a relaxed pace this is easy to complete with the right tools on a cold (never hot engine!) in about 1.5 to 2 hours even with little experience. If you take lots of photos and triple check everything you'll still get it completed inside an afternoon. Since you'll have access to the intake air filter, give that a visual inspection / clean / replacement at the same time. It's a ten minute job to get at it normally (due to the plastic engine covers), but 0 minutes extra in this case.
  6. 4 points
    I have attached a picture guide below on how to replace the read brake discs and pads.
  7. 3 points
    Please ensure you have the correctly orientated battery for your car connections. Do a visual check before you commence this proceedure. If I remember correctly all you need is a 10mm spanner/socket and some petroleum jelly. Unlock the car, you do not want the alarm going off when you connect the new one!! Disconnect the NEGATIVE lead first, using the 10mm spanner, and move the lead to one side to avoid sparking. Disconnect the POSITIVE lead and move the lead to one side to avoid sparking. Undo the battery hold down clamp and put the nut somewhere safe, in your pocket is not a bad place. Disconnect the wired connection on the left hand side of the plastic collar that covers the battery. With a bit of jiggling this collar can be lifted off the battery. You can now lift out the old battery. At this point, check that the umbrella shaped hold down strap bolt has not come out of its slot. The plastic cover removal can move it from where it should be. Check it and tape or tie it up.. now. Replacing the plastic cover is even more likely to move it out of position!! Carefully lift in your new battery to its position, (remembering to orientate it the correct way!) Refit the plastic cover and re-attach the wired connection on the left side of the cover. Re-attach the hold down strap and re-connect the battery terminals starting with the POSITIVE lead. Cover any exposed terminal parts with Petroleum Jelly to prevent corrosion. Start the car!! Should take no more than 30 mins. You will need to ‘resync’ the electric window operations as described on page 45 of the Owners Manual.
  8. 3 points
    Parts: • Witson® LED Display Car Vehicle Parking Reverse Backup Radar System with 4 Parking Sensors (£11.99 from Amazon) https://www.amazon.co.uk/Witson®-Display-Vehicle-Parking-Reverse/dp/B017GZREAU/ref=sr_1_4?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1470234323&sr=1-4&keywords=parking+sensors • Cable ties • Paper templates (attached) Tools: • Small Flat head Screwdriver • 10mm/12mm spanners/ratchet • Drill • 22mm wood drill bit and drill bit supplied with above purchase • wire cutters • soldering iron • largish round/semi circle woodworking file • masking tape or frog tape Time: 1.5 – 3 hours Steps: • Remove all the contents of your boot • Remove the rear hidden box. There should just be a couple of retaining clips that can be popped out with a think flat head screw driver then just pull (also remove the two clips for the rear lip cover as this’ll be coming out also) • Remove the plastic lip cover, can be done with fingers and pulling • Remove the left hand side flip up lid, unscrewing the nuts on the front, then leaning the lid back to reach the nuts underneath • Next remove the left hand side hidden box, by unscrewing the nut at the bottom by hand and removing the retaining clip. This should pull out easily by hand • The wiring harness along the left is where we tap into the reverse light feed. Also remove the rubber grommet in the floor and save for later. • Pull out the wires and locate the reverse light 12v supply wire. On the rx400h it was grey, I believe on rx300/350s this might be red. However if you’re unsure use a multimeter to test. • Strip a section of the wire and solder on the red (positive) wire for supplying power to your control box. Insulate with electrical tape • Ground the black wire (earth) for the control box power. I connected it to a bolt on the rear of the boot where there were other earthed wires. • At this point, I tested the reverse sensor was getting power when the vehicle was put in reverse by plugging in all the components • Next, to fit the sensors. I think most people would remove the bumpers to attach these. However, I was able to fit them with the bumpers in place. That said I have small fingers and wrists.. and was only just able to. Other might find it easier to remove the bumper at this stage. • I found these templates and attached them using frog tape. • Now using the supplied drill bit, carefully drill the holes in your bumper • Behind the plastic is foam padding/strengthening. I used the 20mm wood drill bit to drill though this and created a hole big enough to get my finger in from the inside • Use the round file to smooth off the lip around the hole. • The sensors supplied with my kit needed a small flat screwdriver inserting to push 4 tabs in to release the back of the sensor. This allowed the rubber tabs to move back a little. The idea is you push the sensor into the drilled hole, then push the back on and it secures the sensor. This was by far the fiddliest bit of the install. However, I think it might possibly have been easier to forget about using the rubber clips and just glued the sensors in place. Those without patience might prefer to do this! • Once all sensors are inserted and secured. Thread the wires along the inside of the bumper, securing with zip ties where possibly. • Locate the underside of the hole where you removed the rubber grommet and feed the wires through. I managed this without removing any trim from the other side. I just used some garden wired and treaded it through from the top.. then tied this around the sensor cables and pulled it through. • Once all the cables are back in the boot. Drill/cut a small hole in the rubber grommet and thread them through this. Pop the grommet back in the hole and I used some insulation tape to create a seal. • Now finally choose a location for your beeper/display. I put mine next to the centre cup holders as I didn’t want them too visible on the dash. However, it would work well on the dash or even on the rear view mirror. If you prefer you could even mount near the rear screen as you may be looking back that way anyways (this would be easiest place to run the wires to as well!). • Once fixed. Find the best route and run your wires under carpets and trim into the boot. My route left me only just enough length on the wire so it was cutting it pretty close! • For information, I went back into the centre console, under the carpet in passenger foot well, underneath the front and rear kick plates, and up underneath the hidden compartments. It was actually easier than I thought and didn’t take too long. I had to use the garden wire trick in one or 2 places. • Now plug the screen and 4 sensors into the control box. The shortest sensor cable should be position D, then C, then B and then A (if you’ve gone the same route as me). • Attach to the side wall of the boot where you feel there is room and finally attach the power. • Now replace the left cubby box, the flip up cover, the rear plastic lip cover, the rear box and any other trim you might have removed. • Test the sensors by parking near some vehicles or wall. I found the reverse camera red line gave me about a foot and half distance from the object, the reverse sensor flat line beep, just under a foot. • For £12 I think this is a super cheap mod and very useful to have the extra distance reading and bleeper. You get what you pay for however and the bleeper does sound cheap. Luckily there is a switch to turn in off from the screen incase the baby is sleeping. I might open it up and install a small Potentiometers in front of the speaker to give it a volume control at some point. However, to be honest, I don’t find it that annoying yet. RX300:350:400 Reverse Sensor Templates Left.pdf RX300:350:400 Reverse Sensor Templates Right.pdf
  9. 3 points
    The engine ECU is located on the other side of the panel directly below the glovebox. The 1st step as always when working on the car is to remove the negative battery terminal to remove the risk of anything being shorted out during the process. Step 1. Open the glove box lid and prise out the 2 plastic covers over the support arms by pushing in an outward direction. Once these are removed the support arms simply pull off the bracket on the glove box. The glove box compartment is hld in position by 5 plastic stud fixings, 3 along the bottom and 2 along the top. Using a suitable tool prise these out and then using a plastic blade depress the top edge of the compartment then pull it forward slightly. Remove the glove box light wiring by pushing the lug on the connector and then carefully pull out the right side of the glove box further and ensure the stay arms are pushed back through the slots. The right side stay arm is attached to the glovebox with a nylon connecting cord and damper mechanism so take care not to break this on removal. Once the inner compartment is removed you can now access and remove the 2 10mm bolts holding the panel at the top either side of the glove box door. From here remove the lower passenger side kick panel containing the foot well light, to remove the light socket twist the bulb holder. This will then allow access and removal to a further 3 10mm bolts at the bottom of the panel, one at each end and one in the middle. Carefully lower the panel down to the floor of the car to reveal the ECU as shown in the picture below, the loom will allow this without straining. Reverse the above proceedure to refit everything.
  10. 3 points
    Engine and transmission 2.0 litre engine VVT-i – Variable Valve Timing – intelligent (electronically controlled) ETCS-i – Electronic Throttle Control System – intelligent: advanced computerised engine management system 6-speed manual transmission or 4-speed Electronically Controlled Transmission (ECT-i) with intelligent computer control AI shift system (automatic) Dual stainless steel exhaust system with catalytic converters Cylinders/valves in line 6/24 Capacity 1988 cc Compression ratio 10.0:1 Stroke/bore 75.0 x 75.0 mm Maximum output 153 bhp (114 kW) @ 6200 rpm Maximum torque 144 lb/ft (195 Nm) @ 4600 rpm Performance Maximum speed Manual: 134 mph Automatic: 127 mph Acceleration 0-62 mph Manual: 9.5 sec (0–100 km/h) Automatic: 11.2 sec Fuel consumption Urban Manual: 20.8 mpg Automatic: 20.0 mpg Extra-urban Manual: 36.2 mpg Automatic: 36.2 mpg Combined Manual: 28.8 mpg Automatic: 28.2 mpg CO2 emissions Manual: 233 g/km Automatic: 239 g/km Dimensions Length 4400 mm Width 1725 mm Height *1420 mm Wheel base 2670 mm Fuel tank capacity 70 litres Luggage compartment capacity 400 litres Gross vehicle weight Front Manual: 880 kg Automatic: 890 kg Rear Manual: 950 kg Automatic: 940 kg Total Manual: 1830 kg Automatic: 1830 kg Maximum permissible axle capacity Front 1055 kg Rear 1055 kg Kerb weight Minimum Manual: 1380 kg Automatic: 1385 kg Maximum Manual: 1455 kg Automatic: 1455 kg Wheels and tyres IS200 Wheel: 6.5JJ x 16" IS200 Tyre: 205/55R16 IS200 SE & Sport Wheel: 7.0JJ x 17" IS200 SE & Sport Tyre: 215/45ZR17 Towing capacity With brake 1200 kg Without brake 450 kg Chassis and body Rigid high-tensile steel cabin cage Extensive anti-corrosion protection Super-high quality finish featuring multi-layer paint treatment Suspension Front Double wishbone Rear Double wishbone Brakes Front Ventilated disc Rear Solid disc Safety Driver and front passenger airbags Front seats side airbag system, with curtain shield front airbags Seat belts with pre-tensioners and force limiters Traction Control System (TRC) Electronic Brake force Distribution (EBD) Brake Assist (BAS) Anti-lock Braking System (ABS) Interior Climate control air conditioning Electric windows with anti-jam protection and one-touch auto up/down feature on driver’s side Cruise control (automatic transmission) Front armrest (automatic transmission) Metallic gear shift knob Tilt-adjustable steering wheel Drinks holders front and rear Chronograph style instrument meter design Optional DVD-based Lexus Navigator System Audio 6-speaker stereo hi-fi system with 3-wave-band RDS radio with 18 pre-set channels and Dolby cassette In-dash single slot 6 disc CD autochanger Exterior 16 inch alloy wheels with locking wheel nuts Electric, heated and foldable outside rear view mirrors Front fog lamps Immobiliser Double locking Additional Features – IS200 SE 17 inch alloy wheels with locking wheel nuts 8-speaker hi-fi system Leather/Ecsaine® seat trim Electrically multi-adjustable heated front seats Electric one-touch tilt and slide sunroof with anti-jam protection Headlamp washers Additional Features – IS200 Sport 17 inch alloy wheels with locking wheel nuts Limited slip rear differential 8-speaker hi-fi system Leather/Ecsaine® seat trim Electrically multi-adjustable heated front seats Electric one-touch tilt and slide sunroof with anti-jam protection Headlamp washers Two tone steering wheel Sports pedals Stainless steel scuff plates Rear spoiler Dark tinted rear windows Stainless steel exhaust pipe finisher *IS200 Sport has a lower suspension set up than the rest of the IS200 models. Vehicle height of the IS200 Sport is therefore 1405mm.
  11. 3 points
    If you ever have to disconnect the small 12v battery located under the velour cover in the nearside of the boot, you will find the drivers' side window switches for the rear & passenger doors will no longer work & the scurity system is affected. To rectify this after reconnecting 12v battery, go to each individual door switch on each individual door & fully lower & fully raise each window from their own door control, when you shut each door afterwards you will here 3 acknowledgement beeps. That's it - all controls will now work fine & security system is back to its original state. :)
  12. 3 points
    It is recommended that the engine ECU is reset after any engine performance modifications have been made to the vehicle, including using a higher octane fuel, to accelerate the learning of any new parameters. Resetting the ECU will also clear any stored error codes, however if you have a fault with your vehicle it is advisable that these codes are retrieved rather than wiped as they may help in diagnosing the problem. Make sure the ignition is turned off Remove the engine bay fuse box cover Remove the 20Amp/25Amp EFI fuse Remove the 15Amp ETCS fuse Wait 30 seconds Re-insert the two fuses Install the fuse box cover It is also possible to reset the engine ECU by removing the battery. Please note that this method will also reset any memory settings such as radio presets, trip mileage, clock etc. For hybrid models please seek further information
  13. 2 points
    Disclaimer: As always, this is a guide only and I accept no responsibility for any damage or injury that maybe sustained through following these guidelines. One thing that was really annoying me was when driving at low speeds, the slightest bump would give a rattling noise from the front of the car. The culprit being the worn/rusted slide pins allowing the caliper to move slightly and the metal on metal ,slide pin and caliper mount, clanking together. Tools required (excluding wheel removal): 1. Large screwdriver or lever 2. 17mm open ended spanner 3. 14mm ring spanner 4. Copper grease 5. Hammer 6. 21mm socket 7. flat blade screwdriver or chisel. OK, now down to the nitty gritty. Jack up vehicle and support on axle stands, please see this topic for wheel removal etc --> clicky 1. At this point it is easier for access if you turn the wheel, although this is not neccesary it made photographing easier too. You now need to undo and remove the bolts on the slide pins at the top and botton of the caliper. you will need a 14mm spanner on the bolt on the rear, and a 17mm open ended spanner to hold the slide pin to stop it turning. You may not need the 17mm spanner, it depends on how free the bolt unscrews. You don't want the rubber boots twisting too much so have the 17mm available just in case. top. bottom 2. You now need to push the pistons back slightly so that the calipers come off easier. I use a large screwdriver through the piston and into one of the disc vents. Lever towards yourself to push the pistons back slightly. 3. Now remove the caliper 4. Support the caliper (I use an axle stand). for the rest of the overhaul, I have removed the caliper mount to make it easier to photograph 5. The caliper mount showing the dust boot. The slide pins just pull out. If the grease has hardened, they can be hard to budge. A bit of penetrating oil helps free them up a bit and aid removal. 6. We need to remove and renew the boot if it is damaged or split. I used an old chisel and a hammer to remove. 7. Now we need to put the new dust boot on. For this you need to thread the rubber boot into a 21mm socket. Make sure the whole of the rubber part is inside the socket and the socket is resting on the metal washer. 8. Now offer up the socket and boot to the caliper mount and using a hammer gently tap it in. Be careful that you don't catch the rubber boot between the socket and washer/caliper mount. 9. Now the new slide pins. One is referred to as the Main slide, the other as the sub. Not sure why but there you go, the "main" is the one with the indent around the tip. This will hold the bush, which is just a rubber ring in reality and is slipped over the "main" slide pin, 10. Now just apply lithium grease to the pin and slide it in. Re-assembly is just the reverse of the removal. Slide pin bolt torque is 34 Nm (25 ft lbs). Any questions, please shout. Part numbers for fronts: 2 x 47715-22070 Pin, Cylinder Slide 2 x 47715-30060 Pin, Cylinder Slide 2 x 47769-50010 Bush, Cylinder Slide 2 x 47775-30070 Bush Dust Part numbers for rears: 2 x 47715-22070 Pin, Cylinder Slide 2 x 47715-22080 Pin, Cylinder Slide 2 x 47769-50010 Bush, Cylinder Slide 2 x 47775-30070 Bush Dust
  14. 2 points
    Parts: • Lightning and Aux Connector for Lexus RX300, 350 & 400h (£49.99 from Amazon) https://www.amazon.co.uk/Lightning-APPS2CAR-Integrated-Interface-Highlander/dp/B01AJMU6R0/ref=sr_1_1?s=automotive&ie=UTF8&qid=1470239047&sr=1-1&keywords=rx400+iphone+lightning • Toyota 6+6 pin Y splitter cable (between £10 and £20 on eBay) – OPTIONAL Tools: • 10mm socket wrench screwdriver • soldering iron (optional) Time: ~10-20 minutes Steps: • Put on your parking brake (don’t have your keys in the ignition), using the shift lock put the vehicle into Driver or B • Remove the gear surround, by just pulling with your fingers • Remove the 12v supply panel above and pull away. Either detach the connections or just leave hanging in the driver foot well • Using the 10mm socket, remove the following 4 bolts. The top too are quite well hidden, so you’ll need either an extension for your ratchet or a screw driver fitting. Luckily the bolts aren’t that stiff. Keep one hand underneath in case the bolts drop as you don’t want them dropping behind the centre console • Now just pull the stereo away from the rest of the console. • You will find three connections on the rear. The one you want, is the 6+6 pin connection to the left of the three (looking from behind). You’ll notice that there is already a connector in there.. that is needed as it powers the radio. • You can either use the standard type 1 6+6 Y splitter cable found on eBay. Or if you want to save £15. Then it’s very easy just to remove the wires from the existing loom and splice to the cable from your iphone adapter kit. It’s only two wires afterall. • Here’s the orginal CD changer loom, yellow (1) and brown (2): • Here’s the new connector for the iphone kit, purple (3) and yellow (4): • You’d just need to attach the yellow (1) wire from your CD unit to the purple (3) cable on the adapter and the brown (2) wire from your CD unit to the yellow (4) wire on the adapter. • Depending on the choise you made above, plug the 6+6 pin splitter in the back of the unit (the apapter and orginal CD connector go into the splitter), or the spliced 6+6 pin direct from the adapter. • Now return the head unit back into the dash. I ran the adapter cable behind the bracket behind to create space. • Plug the lighting cable and aux cable into the adapter. • Thread the two cables down the left inside of the centre console (I used garden wire to thread through in reverse and pull the cables through) and out into the foot well just behind the glove box (this might be different depending where you mount your phone) • Reattach the 4 bolts. I put a small ball of bluetac inside my socket so that the nuts are held in place, as you don’t want them dropping off as you line them back up. • Re-Attach the 12v supply panel and gear selector surround. • Put your vehicle back into Park • Then turn on the ignition to test the interface. • To switch to iphone/Aux adapter. Just press the CD button twice. • Optionally I’ve mounted my iphone with one of these little magnetic brackets next to the centre console. It’s a great position and the magnetic disc is great. I didn’t stick it to the phone or case. I just have it in between and it still gets held firmly. https://www.amazon.co.uk/Mpow-Rotatable-Magnetic-Samsung-Smartphones/dp/B019DCFE6K/ref=sr_1_cc_2?s=aps&ie=UTF8&qid=1470240725&sr=1-2-catcorr&keywords=mpow+360+car+mount
  15. 2 points
    Step 1 - Use a large flatblade screwdriver to ease the cover up (place hand over the top in case it flicks up and hits the windscreen) Step 2 - Raise the head rests to expose a plastic trim cover which you can pop out with a small flatblade screwdriver Step 3 - Use a racthet with an extension to remove the 12mm nut, note that the end of the threaded bar is not threaded which lets the nut sit on the end instead of falling down behind the seat to a magnetic parts tool will help you recover it Repeat this for both sides Step 4 - Pull the centre console trim forward (two clips hold this in place) Step 5 - Remove the 12mm nut holding the rear seat bar in place Step 6 - Depress the flexi strip on the side of the seat and unplug the 3 pin connector for the seat base (I found it easier to work both hand in this gap and do it that way) Repeat on both sides Step 7 - Pull sharply up on the seat base and unhook the 4 retainers (two on each side, one set shown in the second picture) and remove the seat bases. Step 8 - Remove the two 12mm nuts holding the bottom of the seat back in place Step 9 - Insert a large flatblade screwdriver into the seat belt guide and twist it, this takes some force to unclip, then slide out the belts Step 10 - Disconnect the 3 connectors under the seat base (just press and pull affairs). Then remove the variosus restraints with a pair of snips/pliers Step 11 - Disconnect the main wiring connector which sits in front of the wheel arch (again just press and pull) Step 12 - Remove the seat back from the car. Note Unhook the elastic around the seat belt clasp on the way out Step 13 - Remove the two 12mm nuts on the nearside seat back also Step 14 - At this point I just folded the seat back down, I had plenty of room and didn't need to do the wiring disconnection on the nearside but it's up to you Step 15 - Use a couple of flatblade screwdrivers to pop the fasteners out (some call them 'christmas trees'). Put a screwdriver either side and lever it up, can be a bit tricky until you have done one or two Step 16 - Press and pull to disconnect the wiring Step 17 - You can now lift up and slide the parcel shelf down the seat belts as shown Step 18 - Remove the 4 10mm bolts holding the sub in place Step 19 - Disconnect the speaker wiring (press and pull) Step 20 - Remove that sub, it simply lifts out Step 21 - Refitting is easy enough, look through the rear screen while wriggling the parcel shelf back into place Step 22 - Plug connector back in Step 23 - Push the black plastic retainers back down Step 24 - Reconnect the connectors and main wiring to the seat back Step 25 - Hook the bottom of the seat back over the threads as shown Step 26 - Hook the bar at the top of the seat over the threads (this bar moves to make fitment easy) Step 27 - Fasten your two 12mm nuts at the bottom in place Step 28 - Pop your elasticated cover over the seat belt fastener Step 29 - Refit seat belts and clip them down (just press with your hand) Step 30 - Re-route the wiring from the back across the seat base area. Use cable ties or the old connectors to route the wiring loom properly under the seat Step 31 - Hook the nearside seat in place, shown is the moving bar which is hooked over the threads Step 32 - Fit the 12mm nut that joins the seat backs Step 33 - Refit the trim in place Step 34 - Fasten the 12mm nuts to hold the bottom of the seat backs in place Step 35 - Pull the seat belts clear then slide the seat base in. Rejoin the connectors as you go. Once you have wriggled it right back, press down at the front (checking the latches are lined up first of course) http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v312/JSeaman/Lexus/LSTRStep35d.jpg Step 36 - Refit the hidden nuts behind the headrests and their covers http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v312/JSeaman/Lexus/LSTRStep36a.jpg http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v312/JSeaman/Lexus/LSTRStep36b.jpg Step 37 - Check everything still works! http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v312/JSeaman/Lexus/LSTRStep37.jpg Step 38 - Click down the speaker cover, this simply pushes down at each corner http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v312/JSeaman/Lexus/LSTRStep38.jpg
  16. 2 points
    Hi, I have been kicking around this site for a while now and I thought it was about time I actually posted something. Here is my guide on how to fit a tow bar to an IS200. Hopefully, everything in this guide is correct, if you see something wrong please tell me. I removed all the boot linings so that I could clean the car out and have a good look around. I took the next few pic’s to show the various wiring connectors and the two drainage tubes coming down from the sunroof. You can also see the alarm siren and remote opening ECU tucked up in the "C" pillars. 290 291 292 294 You can also see some surface rust appearing deep in the inside of the rear arches. This is due to water ingress that I think gets in through the rectangular shaped vents. I expect this happens while driving through deep puddles and jet washing. You can't seal these up, they are needed for air circulation. I will be rust proofing the area later. 293 295 Make sure you have everything available, bolts, nuts, washers etc. especially if like me you brought a second hand part. This cost me £30 from Ebay - yes you can still get bargains off there. 296 I have wire brushed and painted it, you cant put dirty things onto a car. The next pic shows the rear tow bracket and under tray. Both need to be removed before trying to fit the towbar. The under tray is attached buy four rusty nuts so use some penetrating spray and the Tow bracket is attached by three bolts. Keep one bolt handy because you need to refit it to the car. 297 298 The rear silencer needs to be dropped. I pulled the rubbers from the back box but I think you can unbolt the complete rear hanger, be careful because rust will have got to these as well. 299 Don't forget to support the silencer. I didn't jack up the car so I just used a couple of bricks and jack to take the weight and dropped it lower when I needed to. I didn't want to leave it at an awkward angle any more than necessary and have to deal with a split pipe. 304 I also put some tape over the bumper to help avoid and scratches. These pic’s show the rust developing, remember this car is getting on for 12 years old so I expected a bit. I cleaned this up and treated it. If you look at the rear sub frame mountings there is some light surface rust appearing. This could develop into an expensive MOT failure in later years. 293 295 300 301 302 I also took a pic of the car looking from the back to the front so you can all see and compare. If I find myself with some spare time this year I might rust proof the underneath. 303 The exhaust heat shield needs to be removed. You can see that two of the bolts snapped when I tried to remove them. You could try soaking the bolts in a penetrating fluid for longer but if you see the large holes in the heat shield I think you will have trouble, keep an eye out for my 'repair' in later pic’s. 305 306 Underneath the heat shield you can see there is less rust. You can also see two blanking bolts. These need to be removed. 307 Trial fit the tow bar to check that it is straight and fits nicely. Four of the six holes are pre drilled and threaded for you. The remaining two should be marked (using the tow bar as a guide) 308 309 310 If you look carefully in the pictures you can see dimples in the chassis rails. These are guides to show you where to drill. They are more obvious from the top than the bottom. The one on the nearside was difficult to find, I had to take off some paint and rust proofing to locate it. Measure, check and measure then do it again to make sure. You will be drilling into the chassis rails. This will affect the structural integrity of the car so it never hurts to take your time over this. You can drill a pilot hole from the top and then the bottom using the dimples as a guide rather than using a long bit and drilling two holes at once. 312 311 If you are confident then you can use a long drill bit and drill right through I used a long 5mm drill bit to drill a pilot hole and drilled from the top down. Make sure the drill is square to the chassis rails otherwise you will come out in the wrong place. Check to see if you are in the correct place by offering the towbar up to the car. Once you are happy the pilot holes are central to the towbar bolt holes use a hole cutter to enlarge them so that they can accept the tubes from the bolts. 313 The upper and lower holes have to line up. I drilled from the top through. 314 You will also have to drill a hole so that the cable can enter the body and connect to the lights. I drilled this by the jack housing. Check that everything fits. Then rust proof. Pay particular attention to any bare metal. I used Kurust rust killer and then some galvanized spray paint. The spray is great for underneath the car, I used it in the front arches when I replaced all the suspension last year. Don’t forget to paint the inside of the chassis rails too. 316 317 319 318 Fit the towbar and run the cable into the car using a rubber grommet to seal the hole and secure the cable. I think that with some towbars you have to cut the bumper a little. It was tight on mine with the lower lip of the bumper rubbing on the electrical socket plate. 320 321 I used some copper slip grease on all bolts and threads. I have a big pot of this so I use it on everything. It helps to keep everything from rusting. Tighten everything to the specified torque. Both the under tray and the exhaust heat shield need to be cut to fit back on the car. 322 323 324 Refit the exhaust, I removed and cleaned up the exhaust hanger while I had easier access. This is the original exhaust so I expect I will have to replace it in the near future. 325 Now you have to connect the wiring. Because the IS has a bus system with bulb failure warning system you cannot just connect to the rear lights as with older cars, you need a bypass relay. This device takes a signal from the light wiring and draws power for the trailer from a source more suitable. I couldn’t find a permanent or switched live in the boot suitable for the amount of current that I could be pulling in the so I ran a live from the battery. This MUST be fused. You also need an earth. I stayed away from the earths already used, this car has far too many ECU’s for my liking so the less I disturb them the better. Place the Bypass relay somewhere easy to access, away from the possibility of water or mechanical damage. I found the ideal place but then realized that it was in the way of the jack!! If you are planning on towing a caravan you will need to run extra cabling. The picture below shows the wiring connections. A lot of people don’t like the blue connectors but the alternative is to strip the insulation and solder, it's up to you. 326 Keep it as neat as you can and tape up the loom when you have finished. Check everything is secure and then replace all the boot trim. That’s it. You have to bear in mind any license restrictions when towing especially for you youngsters. You should also be aware of the vehicle, tow bar and trailer limitations.
  17. 2 points
    Well, as the Lex has now hit the 6 year mark with 48k on the clock, I thought it was time to change the timing belt. As I'm 22 and a poor student , I don't have the freely available cash to pay a garage to do it so I thought I'd have a go myself and I thought how hard can it actually be and I found that...............well, it's not that difficult actually! I was pretty nervous before I started, but when I got stuck in, it was no problem for a DIYer. I had it completed in a few hours and I have no real mechanical experience, the most I have ever done is replacing shocks, springs and the basic bits and bobs like oil and filter changes. I haven't seen any guides on the forum so I thought I'd take a few pictures along the way to show you guys, so please see below........... For the record, I used genuine Toyota Parts which consisted of the idler, tensioner and timing belt. My other belts seemed perfectly fine so I didn't bother replacing them First, take off the air box and air duct then remove the coils and spark plugs Then, take off the bottom engine cover and drain the coolant, detach the pipes/electrical connectors and remove the radiator/fans Remove the power steering, air conditioning and alternator belts Loosen the crankshaft pully bolt and line the yellow timing mark up with the '0' mark on the bottom timing belt cover as shown below (make sure the car is out of gear) Remove the top timing belt cover and make sure the dot mark on the camshaft pulley is lined up with the timing mark at 12 o'clock. If it isn't, turn the crankshaft clockwise 360 and it should line up perfectly (sorry, forgot to take a pic of this!) FROM THIS POINT ON, IT IS VERY IMPORTANT NOT TO ROTATE THE CRANKSHAFT OR CAMSHAFT! Now the crankshaft bolt is slackened and the camshaft and crankshaft are lined up with their timing marks, remove the crankshaft pulley. Officially you need the special tool, but improvise, as you an see, I used a few little taps of a lump hammer (very gently of course) around the whole outside of the pulley to gently loosen it and then pulled it off Remove the waterpump pulley by undoing the four bolts to allow you to gain access to one of the bolts holding the bottom timing belt cover on. Then, as if you hadn't have guessed.........remove the bottom timing belt cover As you can see in the pic below, my timing belt was frayed and had a few chunks out of it, but was not too bad. OK, now undo the idler bolt and remove the idler. Then, remove the timing belt.....there we have it! it's off! Then remove the tensioner using some allen keys and fit the new one in it's place Fit your new timing belt, starting from the crankshaft timing pulley (keep the belt nice and tight) going clockwise, around the new tensioner, around the camshaft timing pulley and back down to the crankshaft timing pulley. Fit your new idler to keep the belt tight and that's it! The new timing belt is on! It's a good idea to rotate the crankshaft pulley clockwise at this point, just to check that the timing marks still line up after the engine has been turned. Then, it's just a simple case of refitting (or replacing) the other belts, pulleys, radiator/fans (don't forget the coolant!), spark plugs, coils and air box which have already been taken off, and it's time for a cup of tea! All of the above I performed with a good socket set, spanners, some allen keys and a hammer. According to the manufacturer's guide, some special tools are required, but to be honest it just requires a bit of something upstairs to improvise. At the end of the day, no garage are going to stock every manufacturers special tools to do a job on a car which they may only see once or twice a year, they always improvise! I'm no expert and I didn't run into any problems at all, there's plenty of room to work under the bonnet of the IS. All you really need to remember is not to let the camshaft or crankshaft move out of position when the timing marks are aligned and do not rush the job. Easy peezy! Hope this helps someone Kev
  18. 2 points
    I got the dreaded Check Hybrid, Check VSC and Check EBC warning lights. Fault code readings P0A80 Hybrid and P3017 (battery cell block number 7 fault). Having gotten a quote for around €6000 to fix it, I decided to do it myself. I ordered a battery cell on ebay for €45.00 delivered to Ireland. Tools needed: Socket set with 8mm, 10mm and 12mm. Flat head screwdriver, long nose pliers and a multi meter to read voltage. (You may also need a slow trickle 12v battery charger, I'll explain later). Time needed: about 4 hours, more if your connections a very dirty. 1: Remove ALL carpeted paneling from the boot (trunk if you're in the US). This is done by inserting the flathead screwdriver into the black plastic rivets and popping them out. Remove the boot flooring too, just leave the tool tray in place. You will need the 10mm socket to remove the rear boot floor luggage anchor points once you've popped open their plastic covers. The upper hanging points need to be squeezed to remove. Disconnect the power supply to the light on the right hand panel. 2: Remove the orange circuit breaker on the HV battery by sliding to the right and then pulling towards you. 3: Remove the black air duct on the bottom of the HV battery by popping the 2 black plastic rivets. 4: Unplug the power supply to the white cooling fan on the upper right of the HV battery and remove the 2 nuts holding on the fan. This should allow the 2 upper black ducting to move sufficiently to be able to remove them. 5: Open the panel covering the 2 Orange Cables (3 x 8mm nuts) and disconnect the 2 orange cables, (you can tape them up with electrical tape if you so wish). Pull back the rubber cover on the Black cable and unbolt that too. You should now look something like this: 6: Disconnect the cable running from the HV battery to the 12v lead battery. Continue to remove the 12v battery by disconnecting the +ive and -ive terminals and the white connector plugs attaching it the the HV battery. Also need to take off the temp sensor and the vent hose on the 12v battery. Remove the 12v battery support bracket and the battery tray itself. 7: Remove the last 2 bits of black ducting that was clamped by the 12v battery tray. 8: Remove the white tubing on the right of the HV battery. 9: Remove the 4 12mm nuts holding the base of the HV battery in place, 2 on each side. 10: You need to unbolt the nuts hidden behind the back seat headrests. 11: Pull the rear seats forward enough to remove the large plastic panel in the center between the rear seats and the boot wall, its hidden behind the fireproofing fabric. Use this panel cover to hold the seats away from the boot wall by wedging it between seats and wall. 12: Pull back the fireproofing to reveal 2 smaller access panels covered by a black sticky rubber square. Now remove the 3 12mm nuts holding the HV battery to the boot wall. 13: Now the tricky bit, lift the HV battery over the bolts in the boot and slide it out. (I recommend putting cardboard on the tool tray to avoid scratching when sliding the HV battery). If you are strong enough you can lift the HV battery out on your own, if not get help, it weighs about 50 kilos. Your boot should now look like this with the access panels behind the seats visible: You should also have this, I placed mine on some cardboard on my kitchen table: 14: Take off the HV battery cover by opening all the 10mm nuts, and a few 8mm. unclip the black cable while taking off the three cover panels. 15: Unclip the black plastic covering on both sides of the HV battery to reveal the 8mm connector nuts in the orange casing. 16: Number the cells 1 to 40 using a permanent marker. Use your multi meter to get a reading across each of the 40 individual cells, i.e. one lead on the +ive terminal of the cell and the other on the -ive, and record your findings, as you can see cell 28 was low for me: 17: Pull back the rubber vent tubing running along the top of the HV battery until to get beyond your bad cell/cells. 18: Remove the white end panel holding the cells in place: 19: Remove the 80 x 8mm nuts in the orange casing and clean if necessary. I used bleach and some sand paper to clean all nuts a copper plates, if you're gonna do it - do it right). 20: Remove the 8mm nuts holding each cell in place underneath until you reach your bad cell (this will probably involve removing the support leg and the converter assembly unit below the HV battery: 21: Good cells look like this Bad ones like this: 22: Start replacing your cells back into the HV battery, it doesn't matter what order and you can't mess up polarity as it only screws in on one side. I put my new cell in last in case it was a dud. (If your new cell is of a lower or higher voltage use a slow trickle 12v battery charger to get it to the same voltage as the other cells. 23: WATCH THE TEMP SENSORS UNDER THE BATTERY CELLS (3 of them), MAKE SURE YOU CLIP THEM ON AS YOU GO. See the black plastic clip peeping out here: 24: That's it you're done, just reverse everything to put in back in. Mind your back and don't bother touching cell 1 and 40 at the same time if you have the orange connector put back on. Good Luck!
  19. 2 points
    In order to replace the door mirror on the LS400 the internal door panel needs to be removed. It is held by a series of both clips,bolts and screws. Begine by removing the internal door lock surround, this requires a little care not to damage the door lock button and the door release lever. Insert a flat blade into the gap just above the door lock button and gently push the b;ade downwards to release the pin from the trim,do the same at the bottom of the door release handle but this time lever the tool upwards. This should allow the trim to pop out at this end. Pull the door release handle and feed the trim around it before completely removing it. Remove the electrical connector by pressing the tab and pulling out of the socket. When refitting this trim it has a locating lug which engages behind the little bracket to the left of the bolt shown in the picture,this can be a little tricky but if not refitted correctly the trim will not be flush with the door panel. Next remove the window switch panel by using a flat bladed tool to push the clips in at both ends of the panel then again disconnect the electrical plugs. Once the window switch panel is removed it will expose one of the screws Shown below) that need to be removed so remove this. Also remove the screw inside the door air vent feed (below) The screw located just below the door lock mechanism. Then the four black coloured screws at the very bottom of the door trim shown below. The last fixing screw is located in the top right corner of the door pocket below the door handle. Once all the screws are removed it is a matter of gripping the bottom edge of the door trim panel and pulling to release the remaining plastic clips along here and up the sides, disconnect the puddle light connector once you can get to the light fitting. Once the panel is completely loose lift it up and over the top of the door where it meets the bottom of the window, it may take a little effort but nothing will break. Now you have the door trim off you need to remove the tweeter speaker cover by pulling it at the top and unclipping it. Remove the single screw holding the tweeter in position release it from its lower mount and let it hang down. You can now see one of the mirror fixing screws behind where the tweeter was, gently pull the upper door garnish away enough to gain access to the mirror fixing bolts, remove these and then disconnect the electrical connector. There may be some black foam packing in the area, remove as required to gain clear access. The top door garnish is clipped all the way around the door frame with clips which do have a tendency to break so I would advise against removing it completely just pull it back enough as described above. Fit the replacement mirror and then read the above backwards to get it all back together.
  20. 2 points
    Click on photos to enlarge... Buy some of these plastic trim removal tools as above (they are called Blue Tools and made in USA) much better than using a screwdriver covered in rag - I cannot stress how much these will save you in terms of no damage or gouge marks to your interior. Current price on ebay is around £22 or so, search under 'trim removal' Use one of the blue tools and simply pry from the narrow end as I am doing in the first photo, the window switch bank will pop up quite easily. You then need to disconnect it, the plug has a plastic clip that you simply press in with a small flat blade screwdriver and then slide out (indicated by the red dot) Now for the seat height adjuster - I have pulled this out, so you can see the notch where the pin fits at point 'B' in the photo. Another pin locates the trim at point 'A' above the door pull. Place one of the blue tools at point 'B' just beneath the chrome door pull and lever the trim out - this bit is a little tricky, then do the same for point 'A'. You will need to pull on the chrome door handle and hold it in the open position so that you can then remove the trim. As with the window switch, there is another plug that you need to disconnect - highlighted with the red dot. Time for the door panel - nice and easy. The red circles show the locations of the screws of which there are 8 in total, two are hidden - one in the armrest and the other just inside the door pocket, take all of these screws out using a phillips screwdriver. Locations A,B,C,D,E are the positions of the door trim fasteners behind the panel, use a blue tool and insert it between the door card and the door at these points and then pry towards you, they should give easily and the panel will then be loose. OK once this has been done, the door card can now be taken off completely. There is a bit of a technique to doing this - grab hold of the leather armrest with your right hand, get your fingers on your left hand behind the door card above 'A' close to where the mirror is. Lift the door card up with your right hand whilst simultaneously using your fingers on your left hand to gently pull on the plastic trim toward you. The panel will start to come away easily, at this stage don't feel tempted to drop the door panel or yank it as you still need to remove the door courtesy light plug! With the panel free, sit on your drivers seat and pull the door inwards slightly then rest the door card on your legs - you can now use a flat blade screwdriver and disconnect the door panel courtesy light plug (same procedure as the window switches and seat height adjuster). Next bit is easy, pop off the grill that covers the tweeter and unscrew the speaker - wiggle it about upwards to free it from the door, use your hands to gently pull the plastic trim away so you can drop the speaker out from underneath. A small metal tab helps to locate the tweeter and you will see this clearly once it is free. Look at the corrosion on my tweeter! This next bit is a little tricky and requires you to be gentle as I managed to break a few trim clips. Use both your hands and get your fingers behind the plastic window trim surround just above where the mirror is and pull towards you, work your way up towards the back corner of the door. Locations 'A' are where two metal spring clips secure the trim to the door, tackle these last - they do grip the trim quite tightly, so again use your fingers and be gentle but firm. Locations 'B' show you the trim clips - there are only 3 on the door frame. Location 'C' shows one of the four nuts you have to remove. Use an 8mm socket and undo/remove all four of the nuts (they compress the trim against the door) they all run along the same line in the door frame and you can easily see them. The two at the front of the door frame were badly corroded on mine and one of the bolts sheared, both were replaced with stainless steel items from an engineering factor. Location 'A' shows a metal spike located next to the nut and these run along the door frame. Next is the wing mirror, remove the foam insert and then slide the power plug off of the metal tab - disconnect the power supply (same as all the others we have done). There are 3 bolts to remove before you can take the wing mirror off. Loosen all the bolts off and stand with the door ajar so you can hold the wing mirror as you remove the bolts. Wunderbar! Now you have complete access to the chrome trim which is the cause of the problem - the adhesive/ foam backing as you can see on the left photo has completely dried out all along the length of the trim, believe it or not the water gets behind this and tracks all the way down and drips out where your tweeter is!. Temporarily connect the window switches and lower your window, remember location 'A' in the previous stage showing a spike? OK, using a flat broad bladed screwdriver press these spikes gently outward to reveal the adhesive/foam strip - if yours is anything like mine, this will not require a great deal of effort. The final stage - now everything is in pieces, I used WD40 to clean the metal surfaces that the chrome trim will be bonded to, cleaned the door with an engineering brush and hoover plus just generally made sure that everything was spick and span. The photo on the right (white line/arrows) shows where I injected the mastic - to make life easy, I used two blue tools to keep the chrome trim away from the door whilst I did this. I ran a line of mastic all the way along the trim strip, from the top edge of the 'B' pillar down to the corner of the door where the wing mirror fits and I also put some around the wing mirror plate just for good measure. Once you have done all of this, push the chrome trim back into position and replace the nuts and tighten them but do not over do it - as you do this, you can see the trim being pressed against the door and some mastic will ooze out which can be easily cleaned off with some white spirit. When you power the window up, a little more mastic will be squeezed out which again can simply be cleaned off. Finally, refit your wing mirror, power supply and foam insert. Then fit everything back in the reverse order that it was removed in. FINIS.
  21. 2 points
    Air Filter Change This topic has already been answered several times over, but if you're like me pictures give you that extra bit of confidence. The air filter is located above the engine and is held in by 2 metal clips highlighted below. The clip at the back is levered from below so you'll have to reach down slightly. Once both clips are unfastened you should be able to simply lift the filter up and out of its housing. If your filter change is long overdue (like mine was) there will probably be a build up of dust,grit,dead bugs and so on. The one in the picture below is a K&N but the standard one is white (well would have been originally). Now the filter has been removed I advise using a vacuum cleaner to suck out any of the debris the might have fallen back into the void. The filter it's self should just pop out of its housing which would also benefit from a good clean. Once you have everything tidy pop your replacement filter into the housing and refasten the clips.
  22. 2 points
    The 1st thing is to ensure your AC is actually working correctly, most AC specialists will check the vent temperatures free of charge and only charge if further work is required. Expect to pay around £40-£60 for a top up of refrigerent from a professional outfit, the process is normally fully computer controlled. All AC specialists now have to be registered so make sure they have the necessary certificate to do the work. Looking good so far. Once you have your AC in good working order the next thing is to check your pollen filter (the early LS400 1990-1992 did not have a pollen filter fitted so owners of this model please pass this section) These are normally located in the passenger side footwell,in the 1994-1994 LS400 it is located by removing the kick panel, look up and you will see a cream coloured box with 2 wing nuts.Remove the wing nuts and the panel.The 2 filters are located inside the box.Slide the filters back then pull out. On the later LS400 and GS300 the filter is located at the back of the passenger lower glove box, at the rear there is a cover remove the cover and you will see the filter housing, unclip the cover and remove.Pull the complee filter and housing out. Replacement filters are around £20.00-£40.00 some are only available OEM some are aftermarket. The filters can be cleaned with compressed air but generally replacement will give better results. The one below is typical of a neglected filter, removed from a 1997 LS400. Once the AC and the filter are sorted it is now time to move onto the cleaning process. For this I am using an aerosol type cleaner commonly refered to as "The Bomb" method. This aerosol is available at most car accessory shops or in my case at Aldi, prices vary between £3.99 - £14.99. The basic proceedure is to start the engine, turn the AC to maximum cold,open all the air vents fully,place the can behind the front seats ( the transmission tunnel is ideal on a Lexus),activate the aerosol by pressing down the tab and locking it down,close all the doors and then wait around 10 minutes for the can to discharge. Full manufacturer instructions will be on the product you purchase,please read and follow their recommendations. Wait another minute or two once the can has fully discharged to allow the ventilation to purge fully then turn off the engine and open all the doors to fully ventilate. Do not leave the AC on with the doors open as it could overload the system. That's it, the AC and the car should now be smelling nice and fresh with the bacteria killed off. It's recommended to do this every six months but I find once every 12 months is adequate.
  23. 2 points
    The usual workshop disclaimers apply, if you are not sure or don't have the tools don't do the job, this is a vital component on your car. If not done correctly the front wheel could just plain come off. Seems to be a common problem with our cars so I thought I would post this to give a guide. First apply the handbrake, "crack" the wheel nuts on the side you are doing and then jack the car up and support on an axle stand. Use the wheel "chock" (foldable wedge thing from the toolkit) under the opposite rear wheel. Jack up the opposite side front so that the tyre is just clear of the ground (This allows you to turn the steering freely if the steering lock is off). Remove the wheel. Step 1 - With the steering lock off move the wheel to full lock with the front of the wheel outside the arch and remove the ABS sensor. It can be a pig to get out as the grease makes a seal, just rotate and work at it and it will come out, tuck it away at behind the ABS sensor cable at the front of the suspension strut. Once removed I put the bolt back in so as not to lose it! Next centre the steering and engage the steering lock, locate the 2 bolts underneath that hold the hub assembly to the ball joint/steering arm this is the one at the rear and there is a similar one to the front of the pivot. Use a long "breaker bar" to crack the bolts. Get some rope and tie to the top of the coil spring, remove the bolts and lift the whole hub assemble off the spigots and support with the rope ensuring that you put no strain on the flexible brake pipe. (In this pic you can see the ABS sensor coming off the clamp bracket on the suspension strut) Remove the split pin and nut from the track rod end, I put it back on upside down to protect the thread during the next stage in case the ball joint splitter slipped. (Note the WD40 all over the place here) Use a ball joint splitter to remove the track rod end. It will probably go with a loud bang so be be prepared, it will be noisy but not damaging. Remove the split pin from the ball joint main nut. Use that long breaker bar to crack the nut.. Then remove the nut and the track rod. Ball joint splitter comes into play again, you may need to hammer the "fork" to get it in place. Looks easy but I had to use a good fashioned fork and hammer to get this one out. Put the new ball joint in and torque to 123Nm If the split pin won't go through tighten or loosen the nut the least amount possible until you can get a new split pin through the hole. I always prefer to go tighter if it is 50/50 on the nearest slot. Replace the track rod end and torque to 54Nm, same again for the split pin (always use a new one, an assorted box is a couple of quid from Halfaruds) Replace the hub assembly ensuring that it engages on the spigots on the ball joint arm Replace the hub assembly bolts and tighten in turn to a torque of 113Nm Replace the ABS sensor and the wheel nipping up the wheel nuts, drop the car back to the ground and torque the wheel nuts to 105Nm in a "diagonal" pattern. Don't forget to check the wheel nuts after a few miles and it is job done :
  24. 2 points
    OK, finally moved the horns out of sight, but had a problem getting the grille off, so did it over again & took pics. Remove centre screw 1/4 turn cross head & lift up, just lift up headlight clip Use flat head screwdriver to pop-out clips Ensure screwdriver is into the centre of clip or else this happens!!!! This allows bumper movement to get these clips out from behind bumper this is what the clips on the inside of the grille looks like, this is where i had my problem, 7 years of grit/filth had these clips tight as hell, use one hand to push the tab down and the other hand to push grille itself back towards radiator, like i said i had to use alot of force to get off, but the grille is pretty robust and i got mine off in one peice. After i repositioned the horns to the crash bar out of site, i was left looking in at a rusty bonnet catch and radiator clamps So the painting began Wont see much of the rad clams or bonnet catch, but i feel better having done it Original Thread: http://www.lexusownersclub.co.uk/forum/index.php?showtopic=63686
  25. 2 points
    Disclaimer: As always, this is a guide only and I accept no responsibility for any damage or injury that maybe sustained through following these guidelines. Tools I would recommend (excluding wheel removal): 1. Breaker Bar (only required if changing discs) 2. 1/2 inch drive rachet (optional) 3. Large screwdriver or lever 4. Copper grease 5. Piston retraction tool (g-clamp or anything similar for pushing the pistons back). 6. 17mm socket (not pictured) OK, now down to the nitty gritty. I will do the whole thing including wheel removal just incase someone doesn't know how to do it. 1. Loosen (DO NOT REMOVE) wheel nuts before jacking up the car. 2. Open the bonnet and remove brake fluid resevoir cap 3. Jack up the car and support on axle stands. 4. Remove wheel nuts and remove wheel to expose the brakes 5. We will deal with the pad change first. There is a small split pin at the rear end of the pad retaining pin, remove it. 6. There is an anti rattle clip to be removed next in two stages, push/slide it up first, the pivot it out from the top. it can then be withdrawn. 7. The retaining pin can now be pulled out towards you and removed. 8. With the screwdriver, just pry the pads away from the disc slightly (doesn't need to be much), so that the two pads can be withdrawn. 9. Retain the anti-squeel shims incase you need to re-use them. If all you are doing is the pads, you can just re-assemble in the reverse order of the above steps. Don't forget to apply copper grease to the backs of the pads and between the each anti-squeel shim. IMPORTANT: Do not get any grease onto the face of the pad which touches the disc! Jump to step 16 for the other steps. 10. If you are changing the discs as well, then continue with the tutorial. The caliper needs to be removed. There are two 17mm bolts holding the caliper to the hub. 11. Once removed (a breaker bar is very usefull for this), support the caliper on an axle stand or tie it up to the coil spring with some string or wire. Do not let it hang by the brake line. 12. ensure the handbrake is OFF (if you only have one rear wheel jacked up, you will need to put the gearbox in neutral also), as you will need to rotate the disc so that the inspection hole is at the six o'clock position. remove the rubber bung if present. 13. If you are lucky, the disc may pull straight off. If not, you need to back off the adjustment on the hand brake shoes to give enough clearance for the disc to come off. The adjuster is on the bottom edge of the shoes, and is accesible through the insepction hole that you have already aligned to it. Using screwdriver through the hole, rotate the top of the adjuster towards you. I have done a couple of pictures to help visualise what it is you are trying to do, first pic is with the disc already removed to show the screwdriver going through the hub. next is two superimposed pics of disc on and off. lastly, from underneath with disc removed showing the screwdriver tip on the adjuster. It also shows what the adjuster looks like so that you know what you are looking for through the hole. Anyway, hopefully using a combo of those pics, you get the idea. 14. Next are a few pics of the shoes from different angles, just in case you are taking these off for some reason. Shoe wear is tiny if none at all. As the shoes are never on when the wheels are turning, they don't wear down. Don't look at the amount of material left on them as a guage to replacement, brand new ones have a tiny amount on as well. 15. OK. So now the disc is off, and you can put the new disc on. Make sure you align the inspection hole with the hole in the hub. If you forget this, you won't be able to 1) back-off the handbrake shoes next time if you need to, and 2) you wont be able to adjust the handbrake at the end of this change process. 16. Using either 1) caliper piston retraction tool, or 2) levers or 3) clamps, push the pistons back into the caliper. Refit the caliper to the hub using its two fixing bolts. 17. Apply copper grease to the back of your pads, and refit anti-squeel shims if you need them. IMPORTANT: Do not get any grease onto the face of the pad which touches the disc! . 18. The rest of the refit is just the reverse of steps 5 to 9. On the GS at least, the handbrake is not self adjusting. Once the disc is back on, you need to adjust the handbrake with a screwdriver through the inspection hole in the disc. Push the top of the adjuster away from you until it wont turn anymore (don't force it). If you try and turn the disc by hand now, it shouldn't turn. Now back the adjuster off slightly towards you, try and turn the disc, if it wont turn still, keep turning the adjuster back until you can turn the disc. Thats it. Easy. When done, admire your shiny new discs A note here, which I have seen mentioned before and happened to me, the lip on the backing plate of the handbrake shoes was catching on my new discs. I had to use an angle grinder to grind the lip down on the backing plate until it cleared and didn't catch anymore. A bit of a pain it has to be said. I would imagine that you won't hit this problem with OEM discs, and it may well be hit and miss if you do have the problem with copy aftermarket parts
  26. 2 points
    THE CORRECT MEANS OF SUPPORTING A CAR SHOULD BE USED! 1. Support car -remember to turn wheel and remove the wheel. 2. On the inside of the caliper you will see 2 bolts about 14 mm. unscrew the bottom one ONLY!! - you might need to hold the nut with a spanner as well - now depending how worn your discs are, the caliper might lift straight off or not. 3. Best to try and pull the caliper sideways a little ( outwards) this is to try and push the pistons back in a tiny amount to make removing the caliper a little easier failing that you can always just pry up the caliper from its lower end. 4. From the lower end of the caliper, pull up slightly with a bit of effort, then the caliper will rotate around the upper bolt( the pads stay where they are) 4. Look at the pads - you will see 2 little springs that go into the top of the pads pull these out and put them to one side. 5. Have a good look at the pads and note thier positions/ orientation so that there is no confusion on re-assembly - make a drawing if you have to. 6. Remove the pads - just pull them out. one or two of the pads has a metal plate behind it - note its orientation before removing it. 7. If you are replacing your pads, clean the area where the pad sits in the caliper housing, re -fit the metal backing pad (note orientation and little arrow)- put a TINY amount of copper grease/paste between the pad and plate but dont get any on the pad material. do the same for the other pad 7a. Cleaning pads - with a cloth or something clean the mating areas of the pad/caliper and also the metal backing plate on one of the pads ( note orientation, look at the little arrow) .Now if the pads have become worn to the point where the chamfer on the ends of the pads are worn away you should re chamfer these - just use a file or if you have a bench grinder use that ( remember your dust mask) somewhere about 45 degrees should be fine. 8. Re fit the little springs that you removed in step 4. 9. If you have replaced your pads then you will need to push the caliper pistons back into the caliper - use a pair of water pump/ slip joint pliers to do this( if you have painted your calipers best to wrap the jaws with a bit of masking tape or a bit of cloth) If you have only cleaned your pads then you may not need to do this. 10. Lower the caliper down over the pads - if it wont go on something is wrong! check!!!!!!! 11. Line up the hole in the caliper housing and the caliper itself, put some thread lock on the bolt that you removed in step 2. re - fit the bolt TORQUE FIGURE IS 25LBS/FT. 12. Put the wheel back on and lower the car. TIGHTEN THE WHEEL NUTS repeat on the other brake unit 14. IMPORTANT STEP - AFTER STARTING THE ENGINE (DO NOT DRIVE!!!) YOU MUST PUMP THE BRAKE PEDAL UNTIL YOU GET THE NORMAL BRAKE FEELING 14. drive the car slowly and at about 5mph test the brakes just to be on the safe side! - if you have replaced the pads, bed the pads in for a few miles. FINISHED! ok few tips- when you push the caliper pistons back in- if you have a leak of brake fluid then someone has topped up the brake fluid after seeing it was "low" you never need to do this unless you are changing your brake fluid because the brake system is a closed system - the fluid just moves from the reservoir to the pistons as the pads wear. wash off any excess fluid that got spilt with plenty of water as it can damage your paint. Thanks to Mat Clawley for this guide!
  27. 2 points
    It is recommended that the engine ECU is reset after any engine performance modifications have been made to the vehicle, including using a higher octane fuel, to accelerate the learning of any new parameters. Resetting the ECU will also clear any stored error codes, however if you have a fault with your vehicle it is advisable that these codes are retrieved rather than wiped as they may help in diagnosing the problem. Make sure the ignition is turned off Remove the engine bay fuse box cover Remove the 20Amp/25Amp EFI fuse Remove the 15Amp ETCS fuse Wait 30 seconds Re-insert the two fuses Install the fuse box cover It is also possible to reset the engine ECU by removing the battery. Please note that this method will also reset any memory settings such as radio presets, trip mileage, clock etc.
  28. 2 points
    This is a list of things to check when viewing a series II GS300. If you are unsure about checking these items it is recommended that you get an independent inspection carried out. Wheel vibration – The GS300 is sensitive to front wheel balance. Make sure you test drive the vehicle at 70-80mph (where appropriate). Front brake discs – These are prone to warping if wheel nuts are not tightened in the correct order and to the correct torque. Any steering wobble under light braking from 60mph indicates a problem. Ball joints – Perform full lock turns and try to drive over speed bumps and listen out of knocking noise or loose steering feel. Wind noise – Check for noise at 70mph around sunroof, door, mirror and windscreen. Door sensors – Open each door in turn and check the door open warning light illuminates on the dashboard. A problem with a sensor is costly as they are integrated into the door lock mechanism. Battery – When starting the engine should turn over very fast. If the car struggles to turn over may indicate a problem with the battery. Sat Nav version – If the vehicle is fitted with Satellite Navigation then check the CD version. Anything under 3.x will not have full UK road coverage. To upgrade will cost around £100. A DVD based system will contain all road data but newer versions support enhanced features. To upgrade a DVD system will cost around £120. Updates are available from your Lexus dealer or online: http://www.lexus-mapupdates.eu/ LCD display - For non Sat Nav vehicles check the stereo and heating LCD displays for any missing segments. Power Steering Cooler - Check power steering cooler, located in front of the bottom part of the radiator, for corrosion/leaks. Pre facelift only - 1998 to Sep 2000 Master Keys - The vehicle should come with two master keys and one sub key (valet). You need a master key to have additional keys programmed, without such a key the engine ECU has to be replaced to obtain a new key and will cost around £800. Do not purchase a car without a master key and if it only has one master key then obtain another one ASAP which will cost around £100. To determine if a key is a master or not insert it into the ignition, the security light should be off. If you insert a sub key the security light will illuminate for 1 or 2 seconds before going out. Master keys will also normally have three buttons and be able to lock the boot and glovebox. Sub keys only have two buttons, missing the remote boot release. Brake Master Cylinder/Booster - With engine running repeatedly press brake pedal until brake booster pump can be heard running. Allow pump to turn off, around 30 seconds, and repear several times making sure no VSC or ABS warning lights appear or alarms heard. Brake booster is a common failure and currently the only known cure is a full master cylinder with pump replacement at £1600 + labour. Salvage yards are a source of second hand units for around £500. Thanks to Colin Barber for this Guide!
  29. 1 point
    This warrants being put in the 'How to Guide' area as it really is very useful and many many people ask about Slide Pins all the time. Go here http://www.lexusownersclub.co.uk/forum/topic/86430-front-brake-caliper-and-pins-removal/?hl=%2Bslide+%2Bpins Please note I take no credit for this guide...it all goes to Noobie for putting this together. Excellent piccies too. Well done Noobie.
  30. 1 point
    After replacing the faulty Bank 1, Sensor 1 sensor this week it made sense to replace the other Bank 2, Sensor 1 as they have both been in the car for the same period of time. Bank 1 took 15 minutes to do - Bank 2 took 1 hour 30 minutes to do. Both are located in the engine bay - Bank 1, Sensor 1is on the drivers side (UK models) and Bank 2, Sensor 1 is on the passenger side (UK models). Replacement of the Bank 1 sensor is in the IS250 general forum. Bank 2 is shown below. Take your time doing this one as there are a few parts to remove so be patient and do it right. Also - be careful not to drop anything through the engine on this side as it will not go straight through the engine bay to the floor as I found out with a screwdriver I dropped (shown in a picture). You can get dropped items out but its a bit of hassle doing so. There are non engine covers to remove on this side. Make sure the engine is cold. You will burn yourself if its hot !! Remove the battery terminals using a size 10 mm socket drive. Then remove the securing bar which is also a 10 mm nut. Remove the nut then lift the bar out of its securing tab as shown in the picture below (Picture 1) Next you will need to remove the frame that the battery sits in. This is a plastic formed frame - there is a connection that is secured onto the engine side of this frame that needs to be removed first before removing this from the battery. Once the connector is removed then the frame can be lifted out of the way - Picture below shows the location of the connector (picture 2) Just a note - you cannot get to the sensor without removing these items - they need to come out to replace it. It cant be got to from under the car either so the only way is down ! Picture below is of the removed battery - Panasonic? - don't know if this is the original battery that Lexus installed? (picture 3) The next picture shows the battery tray (battery removed) also shows the connector that you have removed from the battery housing - the "tray" that the battery sits on will just lift out of the way (not secured by anything) and once removed will reveal an electronic box you need to remove. While at this point it is wise to check a wiring "bung" indicated in the picture as I found when it rains that the rain passes this connection - just check for water tightness etc as the wiring from this leads into the cabin. (just thought I would check this while I had all the parts off the car) Picture below (Picture 4) With the battery tray now removed this will now reveal the electronic box and 3 plugs that need to be removed from it along with 3 bolts that need to be removed to get the unit out. The picture below describes how to remove the securing connectors from the plugs. Quite a fiddly job so be patient. Once you have the small securing tabs lifted up (by approx. 5mm) then the connector levers can be lifted upwards and in turn this will pull the connectors most of the way out. Total removal will require you to pull out gently so they are fully removed. There are 3 bolts indicated in the picture that removes the unit from the tray. I removed the bolts first as it gave me a bit of "play" to move the box around while removing the plugs but the plugs can come out first (I don't think there is a specific way to do this) (Picture 5) The picture below shows the unit removed after taking out the 3 bolts. (picture 6) The next picture shows the securing bolts (3 of them) that you will need to remove to get access to the sensor. Be careful when removing the tray as you will need to move the disconnected wires out of the way while doing this. Also - before the tray can be fully removed, there is a wire secured to it which is a bit awkward to get to the securing clip. If you are careful you can gently lift the tray up and get to the securing tab. Just squeeze these together and the clip will come off the tray. Once this is off then the tray can be lifted out... (picture 7) (picture 8) and (picture 9) Now you have the tray out the sensor can be fully visible - give it a good dose of WD40 - I found this sensor was quite tight and I used quite a bit of force (hammer and metal bar on the 22mm sensor socket) to get it loose enough to turn by hand. Careful if doing this. (3 to 4 whacks gave it up and it started to turn) the picture shows the sensor lead running to the socket. LOOSEN ONLY AT THIS POINT - You cannot see the sensor plug socket. (picture 10) The picture below shows the sensor plug / socket. It is not visible and can only be removed by feel so knowing where and how the socket is attached is important. The socket is located between the engine and bulkhead - if you look at the length of wire on the new sensor you have then this will give you a good idea of the location of the plug. The removal tab on the socket is the same as the Bank 1 socket - it is facing the bulk head. There is enough room to get both your hands in to remove the socket. Press the tab and gently pull the plug and it will come away. Take the plug out first as in doing so it will be easier as if you do the sensor first then the wires will twist as there are quite a few turns involved to take the sensor itself out. Remove the sensor and replace with the new one - take it easy at this point, due to the space involved, you could drop or damage the sensor but if you take it easy then there will be no issue. After replacing the sensor then plug it into the socket. (picture 11 and 12) The re-fitting is the opposite to removal. After completing it - and with the engine on, you will see a bit of smoke which is normal as it is the WD40 burning off and also the copper slip. It will go after a while. I hope this helps people doing the replacement - cost of both sensors was £150 (£200 if duty was applied), Denso sensors - 234-9051 - the sensors are the same for bank 1 and bank 2. Purchased from the USA.
  31. 1 point
    I purchasd a set of really goosed Aero 18" alloys from the web a few weeks ago with the intention of refurbing them myself - i thought how hard can it be. Tyres on these were excellent but the alloy wheels themselves were all in a very bad way full of bubbles from the corroding alloy under the paint. I have documented how i done this below - to be honest - i am not a mechanic at all and i would class this as a fairly easy repair - just a bit of time and hard work and a few beers while you are doing it.! - pictures of the stages are below ... This is a picture of the wheel as i recieved it - no work done to it yet but you can see the state the alloy is in - personally i would not let my wheels to get into this state in the first place.. First job i took to was to remove all the old paint and laquer that had bubbled - using a paint scraper (sharpened enough to get under the laquer) i scraped all of the bad paint off the wheel leaving the good paint and laquer on. This took roughly 10 minutes per wheel. Being careful not to dig into the alloy although at this stage but it really doesn't matter that much but gives you more work later on - see below The picture below is after taking all the corrosion off with the scraper Next job was to give the wheel a really good sanding down to get it smooth - especially to get the edges of the corroded paint that i had just removed smoothed down to the alloy level. This stage is by far the most depressing as it seems that the wheel is totally destroyed after you have done this but stick with it as from this point it gets better. Having got all the wheel sanded down and feeling smooth to the touch and making sure all the bubbled corrosion has gone it is time to move to the next level. - I used course 60 grit paper to do this first sanding and done it by hand so i could judge how much to take off - i thought using a machine would be too aggressive. picture below is after the 60 grit sanding. This took about 20 mins per wheel Next job was to sand the whole wheel smooth with fine sanding paper for which i used 120 grit - making sure i got the whole wheel smooth and again i done this by hand to judge how much i was taking off the wheel. this took about 20 mins to to per wheel. picture below is after the wheel had been fine sanded down - this is the final process for the sanding so take some time in putting that bit more effort into getting it smooth. Next - i cleaned the wheel with a soft brush making sure it was free of dust - i masked the tyre with tape - didn't go to town and do the whole tyre as i thought with what i put on that would be enough. I coated the alloy with filler primer - a thin coat at first as i thought this would show any blemished that needed to be sanded down a bit more or ones i had missed. pic below of first coat. With this first coat dry - after about 20 mins i inspected the alloy for bits i had missed and could not see any glaringly bad bits - with the second coat this was again put on as a thin coat and this coat covered all the dark spots that were showing through the first layer of primer. Alloy was looking good at this stage. I dont think it was nessesary but i put a final coat of the fller primer on the wheels as i have enough left to do so and just to make sure i had covered all the blemishes The last primer coat was a standard grey primer - applied as above with 3 thin coats until all of the filler primer color had been covered. I left the wheels for a week and came back to them the following weekend to do the final coats. I gave them a good clean with a soft brush once more - i considered doing a fine sand of them before the painting but decided not to. With the sun out and another botle of beer i started the coats of paint for the wheel - i chose silver as the colour. After applying this colour in again 3 thin layers - leaving each layer to dry for approx 15mins between coats i applied the final laquer - 3 coats of this in a bit of a thicker coat from before and the picture below shows the wheel done. All that was left to do now was to fit on the car and to find some centre caps - i have still to find some so put plain blanks on for now - picture of the wheels on the car is below Job Done - It took a bit of time and hard work but the outcome was brilliant - there are a couple of areas that you can see an edge on under the paint but to be honest not that obvious - i know they are there so the next time they need a refurb and lets face it they will in a year or so's time then i will get rid of these areas. Other than that a top job and they look spot on on the car - i am happy with the time i spent doing these - took me a few hours - i spend around £20 on paint and around £4 on the beer so overall it was cheaper than the 50 pound per wheel that you would pay to have done in a specialist.
  32. 1 point
    Copied here from the general forum ... Finally got around to looking at these.- the tilt function when reversing worked well when I bought the car but over time it has reduced to the point where it just twitched when moving into reverse. I planned to have a look at it months ago but just never got round to doing it. I done it today and took pictures of each step. It took half an hour for the first mirror and 20 minutes for the second so not a time consuming job. I needed to replace two worn plastic motor worm gear cogs which had partly stripped and I gave the mirrors a very good clean inside and out. Re-greased and oiled. They had accumulated a lot of dirt over the years and I don't think anyone had been in them since it rolled off the production line so it was a well worthwhile job. They are now working spot on and are holding their memory positions when starting the car. I could not get them to stop working after testing them for about 10 minutes so am happy and confident they are now fixed. I think the winter has a big effect on them when they are frozen up - they will automatically try to set themselves to the user position and also will try to move when reversing which puts a strain on the motors making them skip and strip teeth. Anyway - what I have done below worked for me - I have two good motor units left spare which I sourced which you can use the plastic work gear from or the units themselves if anyone does this and finds they need them. Pictures below are in sequence marked from picture 1 to 14. I have never managed to fit them into a post with instructions against them so the instruction is on the picture itself.
  33. 1 point
    2012 CT200h Brochure and Specifications Guide. Download the guide in PDF format
  34. 1 point
    Do you know that rather than buying a new 3 button key, you can convert your 2 button one? no soldering is required,just get a 3 button key case and a repacement 3 button rubber. The 3rd button is already in place on circuit board.On the denso key anyway.
  35. 1 point
    For members who are working on their Lexus may submit tips along with detialed photos of their work. Please submit as much information as well as high detailed reports on the job you have completed on your Lexus. Also photos and sketches appreciated. PLEASE NOTE: The instructions detailed in " Workshop" are only meant to be rough guides , they are by no means conclusive or contain full maintenance instructions. No responsibility will be accepted by the post author or Lexus Owners Club for any loss , damage or personal injury however caused by following these guides. Consult a fully trained motor vehicle technician before carrying out any modifications to your vehicle.
  36. 1 point
    Q: A: Hi RAC joe here as you may have worked it out I was an RAC man for 16 years around south manchester, this is what to do, open boot, find boot light, pulll it out as to see the bulb and wire,s find the live, helps if you have a meter but it is the one that feeds the middle of the bulb, ok now with set of jump leads and a fuse, any fuse, about 10 amps with 2 people , connect the neg jump lead to the earth of the car, a good clean earth, like boot catch on body not on boot, and with the live jump lead connect to a fuse and with the other end of the fuse tutch it to the live feed wire for the boot light, now press the remote and the doors should open ok then you can open the bonnet, remeber to put neg earth lead on last under the bonnet when you jump start and leave it running for 20 mins before you take off th jump leads, you can turn off the other car when the lexus has started but leave the leads on for a while to let the car push against a battery with some voltage , ok have fun JOE
  37. 1 point
    Q: My car comes as standard with Iridium tipped spark plugs however I have noticed other people have changed theirs for Denso Iridium Power plugs. Is there any difference? The Iridium tipped plugs that are installed as standard are a compromise between performance and service life. The standard ones are designed to be replaced every 60,000 miles (100,000 miles in the US). These plugs have a 0.7mm centre tip. Denso Iridium Power plugs are designed for performance and have a tiny 0.4mm centre tip to concentrate the spark. Due to the small tip these plugs should be replaced every 30,000 miles.
  38. 1 point
    Gold badge kit.............................................PT577-28001 Mini Disc autochanger................................08601-00901 Car Cover..........................................PT248-24010 Carpet Mats Black.................................................PZ410-80351-BG Ivory.................................................PZ410-80351-BN Vertical Cago net.............................PT347-24010 (Thanks to Chris Shipley)
  39. 1 point
    Alloy wheels 17" Alloy - 10 Spoke (tyre 225/65 R17)...............PZ406-K0670-ZC 18" Alloy - 5 Spoke (tyre 235/55 R18..................PZ406-K0671-ZC Under Engine Cover Silver...................................................................PZ415-K0951-00 CoolBox.............................................................PZ450-K0230-00 Cargo nets Horizontal............................................................PZ416-K2340-ZA Vertical................................................................PZ416-K2341-ZA Carpet Mats Black....................................................................PZ452-K0352-AG Ivory....................................................................PZ452-K0352-AN Light Grey............................................................PZ452-K0352-AB Dog Guards Dog Guard (Ivory)......................................................GBNGA-4G146-05 Divider (Ivory)............................................................GBNGA-4G147-05 Dog guard (Black)......................................................GBNGA-4G146-01 Divider (Black)............................................................GBNGA-4G147-01 Boot Liner.................................................................PZ434-K2301-PJ Passenger Foot Rest................................................PZ452-F0350-DD Rear Bumper Protection Film..................................PZ438-K2180-00 Roof Racks Crossbars (Load capacity 75kg)...................................PZ403-K0620-00 Crossbar Accessories Cycle Holder................................................................PZ403-99647-00 Kayak Holder..............................................................PZ403-99645-00 Luggage Box..............................................................PZ403-9963J-00 Luggage Platform......................................................PZ403-99655-00 Sailboard Holder........................................................PZ403-99644-00 Ski Box......................................................................PZ403-9963G-00 Ski Holder (Large).....................................................PZ403-9963E-00 Ski Holder (Small).....................................................PZ403-9963D-00 Towing Towbar..................................................................PZ408-K2552-00 Wiring Kit..............................................................PZ457-K2563-00 Caravan Kit...........................................................PZ457-K2562-00 Towbar Mounted Cycle Carrier..........................PZ403-00501-00 Rear Lamp Set.....................................................PZ403-00501-60 3rd Cycle Extension.............................................PZ403-00500-01 Large Cycle Extension.........................................PZ403-00500-62 (Thanks to Chris Shipley)
  40. 1 point
    This tutorial is based on my 1991 LS400 (please note images were lost for this guide so now a text only guide. A more comprehensive guide coming soon!) Jack up the car or drive it up on ramps then loosen oil fill cap and set aside. Slide under the car and loosen this (1) 14mm oil drain bolt from pan...have your oil catch container ready: The oil won't just fall right down but rather shoot out like water from a garden hose so be ready to position it and reposition it once the oil flow slows down a bit. Once the oil comes to a slow drip then reinstall the drain plug and a new gasket. Torque specs: 14ft-lbs Move your oil drain pan over and position it under your oil filter. Take the oil filter remover wrench and loosen it just enough so oil starts to drip/pour out and let it drain to a slow drip...once it comes to a slow drip then completely twist it off. Clean up the area around the oil filter: Now you're ready to install your new oil filter....Clean the take some oil and lubricate the gasket on the oil filter like so. Twist the new filter in by hand until the base is flush...once the gasket makes contact then tighten it 1/2-3/4 of a turn more: Now add 5.6 quarts of oil back in. Take your car off of the ramps/jacks and start your car up and let it idle for 5 minutes while you check for leaks. Shut the engine off and let it sit for a couple of minutes then check your oil level. Take note of date and mileage....you're good to go.
  41. 1 point
    This tutorial is based on my 1991 LS400 (should work for series II) It took me less than 20 minutes total to remove, clean up and put both sides back together. You'll need: Phillips screw driver 10mm socketRemove this (1) phillips head screw to remove corner: Use your fingers or a flat head screwdriver and pry it open, then pull the corner out (you'll feel resistance but it will pop out) from here: Grab that grey plastic base and twist it like 1/8" clockwise, then pull out the parking light bulb (bulb size is 168)...if you're only changing the corner bulbs then stop here, pull the bulb straight out, replace with new 168 bulb and assemble everything in reverse order...if you're planning on replacing the headlight bulbs then continue with the next steps: Remove the parking light assembly: Remove this 10mm nut: Use the socket to remove this 10mm bolt: Remove this 10mm bolt: Remove this 10mm bolt: Now you're ready to remove the headlight assembly...simply grab and swivel it out like how I have it in the picture...then you should be able to pull it away from the vehicle. (The wires are still connected so don't try to pull it completely off of the vehicle...just enough so that you'll have enough room to remove the bulb): Slide the harness off...you might have to use a screw driver to pop it off: Grab that black ring and twist it counter clockwise to remove it: Picture of the ring removed: Now you're ready to remove the bulb....grab the base like so and just pull it straight out: Picture of bulb removed: Replace bulb with a new 9004 halogen bulb...then reassemble everything in reverse order...do the same to the other side. I used Sylvannia Silverstars 9004 halogens (they're very bright)....I only paid £15 for brand new ones on Ebay.
  42. 1 point
    This tutorial is based on a 1991 LS400, but same principle works through most Lexus models How To: Change Differential Oil (please note images were lost in this guide so is now a text guide) You'll need: Keep the car on a flat level surface...slide under the car from the back and you should see this (bottom left silver bolt is the drain bolt and the top right one is the fill bolt): Mine were on real tight so I had to use a breaker bar along with the 10mm hex socket to help break it loose...if you don't have a breaker bar you could just do this with an ordinary socket wrench...use your foot and "push" the wrench to help break the bolt loose. Loosen and remove the fill bolt first, then get a container to catch the old fluid and proceed with removing the drain bolt. Once both bolts are out, wipe them off. The drain bolt has a magnet attached to it and as you can see in the pictures, all that black stuff on the paper towel were actually metal shards: Replace the 2 washers, then tighten the drain bolt. Add the gear lube through the fill hole until it starts to drip out of the fill hole...I attached a little section of 1/2" plastic tubing to the bottle to help me get the new fluid in. Once the lube starts to drip out of the hole (approx 1.4 quarts) then screw the fill bolt back in there. Clean up the area and check for leaks:
  43. 1 point
    This tutorial is based on a 1991 LS400, but same principle works through most Lexus models How To: Change Differential Oil (please note images were lost in this guide so is now a text guide) You'll need: Keep the car on a flat level surface...slide under the car from the back and you should see this (bottom left silver bolt is the drain bolt and the top right one is the fill bolt): Mine were on real tight so I had to use a breaker bar along with the 10mm hex socket to help break it loose...if you don't have a breaker bar you could just do this with an ordinary socket wrench...use your foot and "push" the wrench to help break the bolt loose. Loosen and remove the fill bolt first, then get a container to catch the old fluid and proceed with removing the drain bolt. Once both bolts are out, wipe them off. The drain bolt has a magnet attached to it and as you can see in the pictures, all that black stuff on the paper towel were actually metal shards: Replace the 2 washers, then tighten the drain bolt. Add the gear lube through the fill hole until it starts to drip out of the fill hole...I attached a little section of 1/2" plastic tubing to the bottle to help me get the new fluid in. Once the lube starts to drip out of the hole (approx 1.4 quarts) then screw the fill bolt back in there. Clean up the area and check for leaks:
  44. 1 point
    1.remove back wheel 2. Inspect Pad Thickness Minimum Thickness : 1.0mm (0.039 in) 3.Remove Anti-Squeal Spring And Pad Guide NOTICE . Do Not deform the clip and anti-sqeal spring .The anti-squeal clip and spring can be used again, provided that they have sufficient rebound, no-deformation, cracks or wear, and have had all rust, dirt and particles cleaned off. 4.Remove Pads And Anti-Squeal Shims 5.Check Disc Thickness And Runout 6.Install New Pads HINT .Make sure the arrows on the inner anti-squeal shims facing to the direction of disc rotation .Preess in the pistons with a wrench handle or equivelant(tape the end of the tool with tape) .If the piston is difficult to push in, loosen the bleeder screw 7.Install Pad GuidePin And Anti-Squeal Spring 8.Install Rear Wheel TORQUE TO: 103Nm (1,050Kgf.cm, 76 ft.lbf) 9.Depress Brake Pedal Several Times 10.Check That Fluid Level Is At Max Line Thanks to Mat Clawley for the guide!
  45. 1 point
    THE CORRECT MEANS OF SUPPORTING A CAR SHOULD BE USED! 1. Support car -remember to turn wheel and remove the wheel. 2. On the inside of the caliper you will see 2 bolts about 14 mm. unscrew the bottom one ONLY!! - you might need to hold the nut with a spanner as well - now depending how worn your discs are, the caliper might lift straight off or not. 3. Best to try and pull the caliper sideways a little ( outwards) this is to try and push the pistons back in a tiny amount to make removing the caliper a little easier failing that you can always just pry up the caliper from its lower end. 4. From the lower end of the caliper, pull up slightly with a bit of effort, then the caliper will rotate around the upper bolt( the pads stay where they are) 4. Look at the pads - you will see 2 little springs that go into the top of the pads pull these out and put them to one side. 5. Have a good look at the pads and note thier positions/ orientation so that there is no confusion on re-assembly - make a drawing if you have to. 6. Remove the pads - just pull them out. one or two of the pads has a metal plate behind it - note its orientation before removing it. 7. If you are replacing your pads, clean the area where the pad sits in the caliper housing, re -fit the metal backing pad (note orientation and little arrow)- put a TINY amount of copper grease/paste between the pad and plate but dont get any on the pad material. do the same for the other pad 7a. Cleaning pads - with a cloth or something clean the mating areas of the pad/caliper and also the metal backing plate on one of the pads ( note orientation, look at the little arrow) .Now if the pads have become worn to the point where the chamfer on the ends of the pads are worn away you should re chamfer these - just use a file or if you have a bench grinder use that ( remember your dust mask) somewhere about 45 degrees should be fine. 8. Re fit the little springs that you removed in step 4. 9. If you have replaced your pads then you will need to push the caliper pistons back into the caliper - use a pair of water pump/ slip joint pliers to do this( if you have painted your calipers best to wrap the jaws with a bit of masking tape or a bit of cloth) If you have only cleaned your pads then you may not need to do this. 10. Lower the caliper down over the pads - if it wont go on something is wrong! check!!!!!!! 11. Line up the hole in the caliper housing and the caliper itself, put some thread lock on the bolt that you removed in step 2. re - fit the bolt TORQUE FIGURE IS 25LBS/FT. 12. Put the wheel back on and lower the car. TIGHTEN THE WHEEL NUTS repeat on the other brake unit 14. IMPORTANT STEP - AFTER STARTING THE ENGINE (DO NOT DRIVE!!!) YOU MUST PUMP THE BRAKE PEDAL UNTIL YOU GET THE NORMAL BRAKE FEELING 14. drive the car slowly and at about 5mph test the brakes just to be on the safe side! - if you have replaced the pads, bed the pads in for a few miles. FINISHED! ok few tips- when you push the caliper pistons back in- if you have a leak of brake fluid then someone has topped up the brake fluid after seeing it was "low" you never need to do this unless you are changing your brake fluid because the brake system is a closed system - the fluid just moves from the reservoir to the pistons as the pads wear. wash off any excess fluid that got spilt with plenty of water as it can damage your paint. Thanks to Mat Clawley for this guide!
  46. 1 point
    THE CORRECT MEANS OF SUPPORTING A CAR SHOULD BE USED! 1. Support car -remember to turn wheel and remove the wheel. 2. On the inside of the caliper you will see 2 bolts about 14 mm. unscrew the bottom one ONLY!! - you might need to hold the nut with a spanner as well - now depending how worn your discs are, the caliper might lift straight off or not. 3. Best to try and pull the caliper sideways a little ( outwards) this is to try and push the pistons back in a tiny amount to make removing the caliper a little easier failing that you can always just pry up the caliper from its lower end. 4. From the lower end of the caliper, pull up slightly with a bit of effort, then the caliper will rotate around the upper bolt( the pads stay where they are) 4. Look at the pads - you will see 2 little springs that go into the top of the pads pull these out and put them to one side. 5. Have a good look at the pads and note thier positions/ orientation so that there is no confusion on re-assembly - make a drawing if you have to. 6. Remove the pads - just pull them out. one or two of the pads has a metal plate behind it - note its orientation before removing it. 7. If you are replacing your pads, clean the area where the pad sits in the caliper housing, re -fit the metal backing pad (note orientation and little arrow)- put a TINY amount of copper grease/paste between the pad and plate but dont get any on the pad material. do the same for the other pad 7a. Cleaning pads - with a cloth or something clean the mating areas of the pad/caliper and also the metal backing plate on one of the pads ( note orientation, look at the little arrow) .Now if the pads have become worn to the point where the chamfer on the ends of the pads are worn away you should re chamfer these - just use a file or if you have a bench grinder use that ( remember your dust mask) somewhere about 45 degrees should be fine. 8. Re fit the little springs that you removed in step 4. 9. If you have replaced your pads then you will need to push the caliper pistons back into the caliper - use a pair of water pump/ slip joint pliers to do this( if you have painted your calipers best to wrap the jaws with a bit of masking tape or a bit of cloth) If you have only cleaned your pads then you may not need to do this. 10. Lower the caliper down over the pads - if it wont go on something is wrong! check!!!!!!! 11. Line up the hole in the caliper housing and the caliper itself, put some thread lock on the bolt that you removed in step 2. re - fit the bolt TORQUE FIGURE IS 25LBS/FT. 12. Put the wheel back on and lower the car. TIGHTEN THE WHEEL NUTS repeat on the other brake unit 14. IMPORTANT STEP - AFTER STARTING THE ENGINE (DO NOT DRIVE!!!) YOU MUST PUMP THE BRAKE PEDAL UNTIL YOU GET THE NORMAL BRAKE FEELING 14. drive the car slowly and at about 5mph test the brakes just to be on the safe side! - if you have replaced the pads, bed the pads in for a few miles. FINISHED! ok few tips- when you push the caliper pistons back in- if you have a leak of brake fluid then someone has topped up the brake fluid after seeing it was "low" you never need to do this unless you are changing your brake fluid because the brake system is a closed system - the fluid just moves from the reservoir to the pistons as the pads wear. wash off any excess fluid that got spilt with plenty of water as it can damage your paint. Thanks to Mat Clawley for this guide!
  47. 1 point
    NOTE: Do not let brake fluid remain on painted surfaces. Wash it off immediately This is a 2 person operation (1) Fill reservoir with brake fluid to specification: SAE J1703 or FMVSS No. 116 DOT3 (2) Connect the Bleed tube to the caliper(nipple) (3) Depress the brake pedal several times, then loosen the bleed nipple with the pedal held down. (4) At the point that fluid stops coming out, tighten the bleed nipple, then release the brake pedal (5) Repeat 3 + 4 untill all the air in the fluid has been bled out REPEAT THE PROCEDURE FOR ALL BRAKE LINES AT EACH WHEEL Torque: 11N .m (110 Kgf.cm, 8 Ft.lbf)
  48. 1 point
    It is recommended that the engine ECU is reset after any engine performance modifications have been made to the vehicle, including using a higher octane fuel, to accelerate the learning of any new parameters. Resetting the ECU will also clear any stored error codes, however if you have a fault with your vehicle it is advisable that these codes are retrieved rather than wiped as they may help in diagnosing the problem. Make sure the ignition is turned off Remove the engine bay fuse box cover Remove the 20Amp/25Amp EFI fuse Remove the 15Amp ETCS fuse Wait 30 seconds Re-insert the two fuses Install the fuse box cover It is also possible to reset the engine ECU by removing the battery. Please note that this method will also reset any memory settings such as radio presets, trip mileage, clock etc.
  49. 1 point
    It is recommended that the engine ECU is reset after any engine performance modifications have been made to the vehicle, including using a higher octane fuel, to accelerate the learning of any new parameters. Resetting the ECU will also clear any stored error codes, however if you have a fault with your vehicle it is advisable that these codes are retrieved rather than wiped as they may help in diagnosing the problem. Make sure the ignition is turned off Remove the engine bay fuse box cover Remove the 20Amp/25Amp EFI fuse Remove the 15Amp ETCS fuse Wait 30 seconds Re-insert the two fuses Install the fuse box cover It is also possible to reset the engine ECU by removing the battery. Please note that this method will also reset any memory settings such as radio presets, trip mileage, clock etc.
  50. 1 point
    It is recommended that the engine ECU is reset after any engine performance modifications have been made to the vehicle, including using a higher octane fuel, to accelerate the learning of any new parameters. Resetting the ECU will also clear any stored error codes, however if you have a fault with your vehicle it is advisable that these codes are retrieved rather than wiped as they may help in diagnosing the problem. Make sure the ignition is turned off Remove the engine bay fuse box cover Remove the 20Amp/25Amp EFI fuse Remove the 15Amp ETCS fuse Wait 30 seconds Re-insert the two fuses Install the fuse box cover It is also possible to reset the engine ECU by removing the battery. Please note that this method will also reset any memory settings such as radio presets, trip mileage, clock etc.




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