John N

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About John N

  • Rank
    Advanced Member

Profile Information

  • First Name
    John
  • Gender
    Male
  • Lexus Model
    LS430
  • Year of Lexus
    2001
  • UK/Ireland Location
    Lancashire
  • Interests
    General Automotive
  1. I replaced the big rear bush on my lower front offside wishbone the other day, and I've had no problems. The wishbone pivots on the front and rear rubber bushes, so in a way they act as rubber torsion springs. Like your mechanic I jacked the car up with the wheel hanging down, but when I fitted the new bush I didn't tighten the nut on the wishbone that clamps the center of the bush. I then took the car off the jack and drove round the block with the suspension height set to normal, so that the suspension was at its' normal ride height before finally tightening the nut to clamp the bush to the wishbone. If your new bushes have been fitted with the wheels hanging down, they will be acting as extra springs which will put a strain on the bushes and will upset the suspension settings. John N
  2. Before you spend a lot of money on coils, start with the cheaper things. Unless you have personnaly changed the spark plugs start with them, don't believe any service history. For what it costs change all 8 plugs and use the Denso Iridium ones from you local Lexus spares department. Is it misfiring on both LPG and Petrol under the same conditions? If it is, you are right to look at the ignition system, but if it only does it on one fuel check that system. Best of luck. John N
  3. Try measuring the resistance of all the coils, and see if one or two of them are much higher or lower than the rest. It worked for me to identify the faulty HT suppressors on an old Merc. John N
  4. One point I have been told of is that the LS460 cannot be converted to LPG because the engine uses direct petrol injection. But I your not planning to have an LPG conversion, no problem. John N
  5. I can't believe the range of LPG prices at the moment. I'm currently paying 57p (cash) at my local supplier. (Up from 55p five weeks ago.) But I've just returned from a holiday trip to Cornwall and I've had to pay up to 79.9p at some locations. It all appears to depend on how much competition there is in a given area or how greedy the suppliers are when they can get away with it. The highest prices I've found were on the M61 near Bolton and near Helston in Cornwall. John N
  6. If the diff was not working correctly and allowing the rear wheels to turn at the different speeds they need to go round bends you you could still see a similar amount of wear on each tyre. As long as you go round a similar number fo left and right hand bends. You can check the diff feels ok by chocking the front wheels, releasing the parking brake, and using a trolly jack on the diff to raise the back of the car. Then with the gear lever in 'park' turn one of the back wheels by hand. It should turn smoothly and because the drive shaft is locked the opposite wheel should turn smoothly in the opposite direction. John N
  7. Just fitted a new set of tyres 3 months ago, they are Nokian Z G2, up to now they have been quite quiet on all sorts of road surfaces. They are also very predictable in the wet and dry and don't appear to have any vices, but I can't comment on their life yet. Up to now I would certainly recommend them. See link: - http://www.mytyres.co.uk/cgi-bin/rshop.pl?s_p=Nokian-Z-G2-225_55-ZR17-101W-XL&details=Ordern&typ=D-104567&cart_id=87724813.110.29209&ranzahl=4&Breite=225&Herst=Nokian&Quer=55&Felge=17&Speed=W&weiter=0&kategorie=6&Ang_pro_Seite=20&Transport=P&dsco=110&sowigan=So&m_s=3&x_tyre_for=PKW&rsmFahrzeugart=PKW They won't be available for long as they have been superseeded by the Nokian zLine - http://www.mytyres.co.uk/cgi-bin/rshop.pl?s_p=Nokian-zLine-225_55-ZR17-101Y-XL&details=Ordern&typ=R-241206&cart_id=87724813.110.29209&ranzahl=4&Breite=225&Herst=Nokian&Quer=55&Felge=17&Speed=W&weiter=0&kategorie=6&Ang_pro_Seite=20&Transport=P&dsco=110&sowigan=So&m_s=3&x_tyre_for=PKW&rsmFahrzeugart=PKW When I bought them in November they were at a good discount because they are a Summer Tyre and were supplied from Germany where they have to use Winter Tyres at that time of year. Read the user reviews and see what you think. John N.
  8. This is the site I use to check the best LPG prices http://www.filllpg.co.uk/ but it does depend on the feedback from users and so it isn't always up to date. It's also usefull to run the app on your mobile, it shows you the stations near you on a map, and I've had no problems with spam. The predictions for future prices is that they will continue to fall. The increasing shale gas production in the USA is already reducing world demand for LPG and driving down the price. John N
  9. This thread has prompted me to check the economics of my conversion today. Most of my driving is in town traffic, on petrol I get 20 mpg and on LPG I get 16 mpg. (Down 20% which is about right.) Equivalent to 4.396 miles/litre on petrol and 3.516 miles/litre on LPG, and my local fuel prices are 130.9 p for petrol and 60 p for LPG. That means my fuel costs are 29.8 p per mile on petrol or 17.6 p per mile 0n LPG, making it 42% cheaper to use LPG. I always thought the 50% savings claims were exagerated, but a 42% saving on todays petrol prices still makes a conversion worth while. On the question of valve seat regression I had an incident with my previous LPG converted car, an S Class Merc. It had a slight judder on a light throttle which I thought may be due to the LPG conversion. The local LPG "expert" insisted I had the engine electronics checked independently at great expence. The report from the electronics "expert" was that the electronics were ok but the engine had terminal valve seat regression. A free compression test at the local engine rebuild specialist showed there was nothing wrong with the valves and the engine was ok! In the end the problem was a worn flexible coupling on the drive shaft. But you have to ask how often valve seat regression is mis-diagnosed when a garage can't find the real fault? John N
  10. Repaired a linkage rod in my old Mercs door lock mechanism with an electrical connector and aroldite once. It worked better than the original linkage rod. (It didn't brake.) John N
  11. Not true. Winter tyres are designed to perform better than Summer tyres when the temperiture is below 8deg, but there is no sudden change in performance. They don't 'fall of a cliff' as the temperiture rises, the same as Summer tyres don't suddenly go off as the temp falls. You just go by the average temp at the time. Last year I put mine on at the end of November and kept tham on till mid April. The real advantage is the extra grip you get in ice, snow and slush, When it's like that they transform the car from a liability to a safe means of transport. John N The only people who think its not true are those who have made money promoting the sale of a second set of tyres and those who believed them. No one really needs except for 4 or 5 weeks maximum a year. If you used them between November and April you were on a less effective tyre most of the time. I didn't drive my car in ice snow or slush more than 3 times in the whole of last year and it was the worst year we have had for a long time. You get nothing for nothing and winter tyres are less efficient most of the time and les effective too. Again I have to say I don't believe that is true. From experiance I definatly believe winter tyres perform better than summer tyres below 8 deg, and if you check the average temperitures for those months you will see they were the right tyre for the majority of the time. In any case WINTER TYRES COST NOTHING EXTRA AND TYRE DEALERS MAKE NOTHING EXTRA OUT OF SELLING THEM. How can that be true? Well the simple fact is that a car can only wear out one set of tyres at a time. Take the example of a car covering 40,000 miles a year and using tyres that last for 40,000 miles. You would have to buy one set of tyres a year. Compare that to a car covering the same distance using summer and winter tyres. For 9 months of the year it will use summer tyres and cover 30,000 miles i.e. 3/4 of the life of the tyres. For 3 months (Dec, Jan. & Feb.) it will run on winter tyres and cover 10,000 miles using 1/4 of the life of the winter tyres. Over 4 years it will use 1 set of winter tyres and 3 sets of summer tyres. That is one set of tyres a year that will need to be bought - the same as the car using summer tyres all the time. What does cost extra is the garage charges for changing the tyres twice a year if you only have one set of wheels. That is why people buy a cheap set of wheels to put their winter tyres on, once you have bought the wheels you can change them yourself in an hour and it will cost you no more in the long run. Tyre dealers selling winter tyres don't sell more tyres they just need to carry a larger range of stock to satisfy the demands of customers who appreciate the safety advantages they give. Deciding if you need winter tyres is another matter, if I lived in Cornwall I wouldn't bother, but in Scotland many people consider them a necessity. John N Yes John your right on an individual basis if the owner is going to keep the car through two full sets of tyres and use them equally in winter and summer it matters little apart from the fact that normal tyres have been developed very effectively over the years to be very efficient in all sorts of road surfaces and conditions. Winter tyres are not even a definition of anything resembling a credible style of tyre for any condition of road surface or weather. Winter is different all over the country and you righty say in Scotland, a winter tyre with more focus on ice or cold temperatures may well be appropriate at 'more' times of the year. This leaves us with the image of people getting to the border and jacking the car up to change tyres its completely stupid. You may well use bold type and large letters but that just makes you look even more silly. Fact is in the UK weather changes weekly and changing tyres every 6 months is not wise. However on the west coast of Scotland palm trees bloom and the weather is even mild when the centre of Scotland has snow drifts so even stopping at the border and changing tyres from your trailer attached (presumably) to the back of a 430SC !!! isn't going to be practical. Get real. You will be on the wrong tyre for the conditions a lot more often than I will.. So I will be considerably safer that thou. Your a victim of the tyre manufacturers aim to sell tyres to those who cant consider more than one variable at a time. Think we are going to have to agree to differ on this one! John N
  12. Not true. Winter tyres are designed to perform better than Summer tyres when the temperiture is below 8deg, but there is no sudden change in performance. They don't 'fall of a cliff' as the temperiture rises, the same as Summer tyres don't suddenly go off as the temp falls. You just go by the average temp at the time. Last year I put mine on at the end of November and kept tham on till mid April. The real advantage is the extra grip you get in ice, snow and slush, When it's like that they transform the car from a liability to a safe means of transport. John N The only people who think its not true are those who have made money promoting the sale of a second set of tyres and those who believed them. No one really needs except for 4 or 5 weeks maximum a year. If you used them between November and April you were on a less effective tyre most of the time. I didn't drive my car in ice snow or slush more than 3 times in the whole of last year and it was the worst year we have had for a long time. You get nothing for nothing and winter tyres are less efficient most of the time and les effective too. Again I have to say I don't believe that is true. From experiance I definatly believe winter tyres perform better than summer tyres below 8 deg, and if you check the average temperitures for those months you will see they were the right tyre for the majority of the time. In any case WINTER TYRES COST NOTHING EXTRA AND TYRE DEALERS MAKE NOTHING EXTRA OUT OF SELLING THEM. How can that be true? Well the simple fact is that a car can only wear out one set of tyres at a time. Take the example of a car covering 40,000 miles a year and using tyres that last for 40,000 miles. You would have to buy one set of tyres a year. Compare that to a car covering the same distance using summer and winter tyres. For 9 months of the year it will use summer tyres and cover 30,000 miles i.e. 3/4 of the life of the tyres. For 3 months (Dec, Jan. & Feb.) it will run on winter tyres and cover 10,000 miles using 1/4 of the life of the winter tyres. Over 4 years it will use 1 set of winter tyres and 3 sets of summer tyres. That is one set of tyres a year that will need to be bought - the same as the car using summer tyres all the time. What does cost extra is the garage charges for changing the tyres twice a year if you only have one set of wheels. That is why people buy a cheap set of wheels to put their winter tyres on, once you have bought the wheels you can change them yourself in an hour and it will cost you no more in the long run. Tyre dealers selling winter tyres don't sell more tyres they just need to carry a larger range of stock to satisfy the demands of customers who appreciate the safety advantages they give. Deciding if you need winter tyres is another matter, if I lived in Cornwall I wouldn't bother, but in Scotland many people consider them a necessity. John N
  13. When I needed one a couple of years ago the local Lexus main dealers spares department turned out to be cheapest! You can be sure of getting the right size as well, just ask for a discount! John N
  14. Not true. Winter tyres are designed to perform better than Summer tyres when the temperiture is below 8deg, but there is no sudden change in performance. They don't 'fall of a cliff' as the temperiture rises, the same as Summer tyres don't suddenly go off as the temp falls. You just go by the average temp at the time. Last year I put mine on at the end of November and kept tham on till mid April. The real advantage is the extra grip you get in ice, snow and slush, When it's like that they transform the car from a liability to a safe means of transport. John N
  15. They are not for sale, it's the set I use for my winter tyres. I'm using my 'summer' wheels and tyres at the moment, so they would be available for someone to borrow for a couple of days while theirs were refurbished. Picked them up on E-bay fully refurbished and fitted with part used tyres, paid less than the tyres were worth. John N