Rabbers

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Everything posted by Rabbers

  1. The last three posts add up to an interesting example of eristic coprophilia, unexpected in a Lexus forum....
  2. My wife was just now looking over my shoulder at the photo of the worsened damage among the latest crop of posts. Her immediate thought, which I offer as a possibility, is that a small battery-operated appliance such as a torch with an unnoticed leak left on the seat even for a short time may have been the culprit. Anyway, I wish you luck but doubt if you’ll get any further response from Lexus.
  3. Rabbers

    IS300h run flat tyre

    I believe - in fact I know - the IS300h can be fitted with runflats. I once had an IS300h loaner when mine was being serviced, and, when asked if I had liked the ride, was slightly embarrassed to discover I had been driving on 17" Bridgestone runflats (245/45 if I remember right), noticing no difference whatsoever in respect of my own normal 18" PZeros. Admittedly, I had driven mainly in slow town traffic and quite good roads. Maybe cobblestones and higher speeds would have made more of a difference. I must say that I toy with the idea of choosing runflats every time I buy new tyres, but have so far always been put off by the prices.
  4. John: Thank you very much. That’s precisely the sort of guidance I was looking for.... 👍
  5. Interesting thread with lots of impressive technical information but, as the driver of a Lexus hybrid who places no abnormal demands on it, I am still none the wiser as to if or why or when I might need to worry about an old or ageing 12v battery. As far as I can gather, provided that cost is not an issue, nobody disagrees with the idea of replacing the battery after five years even if it is showing no untoward symptoms, the sole disincentive being the undemonstrable risk of replacing what may be a perfectly good battery with a faulty one. Is this a fair summary interpretation of the opinions so far expressed in the thread?
  6. I’m sorry to be pessimistic but, if my experience of what sounds like the same problem was anything to go by, you will need to go to Lexus or, alternatively, a well-equipped professional body shop, keeping your fingers crossed that no metal part is broken or bent and needs replacing. If intact, the spring mechanism can quickly be snapped back into position by the use of a dedicated tool that holds the various connecting bars at the correct tension. This tool looks something like a crowbar but, I was told, not all workshops possess one and/or a mechanic skilled in its use.
  7. Conventional wisdom, with which I would not quarrel, holds that you should not drive through water higher than your wheel axis - and then always as slowly as you possibly can in order not to create waves and splashing - which also means you should not, even when you know the drivers are not idiots, follow other cars into the flooding until their wake has subsided. But whatever your personal attitude to the risk may be, it would be best to know what your insurance policy says about responsibility for possible damage of any kind.
  8. Phil: Try using Optimum Wash & Shine, 1-2 capfuls per bucketful of water. It is marketed primarily as a rinseless wash but is an excellent and gentle water softener.
  9. Rabbers

    New rc announced

    Actually, until Lexus started aiming higher and wider, isn't this what all its customers were supposed to look like? ...
  10. I just inspected the rear-seats leather in my own 2016 RC and it looks fine. To judge by the photos, a section of your leather and adjacent cloth appears to have been affected by some kind of corrosive external agent - and if Lexus says it was not acid from the batteries, I don't see how you can contradict. The closest I have seen to your problem was in the boot of an IS250 to the rear of which I kept a box with a few car-cleaning products. The contents of one of these, a liquid wax/polish, had separated from non-use leaving a thin liquid on top, and this had leaked through the box onto the boot carpet leaving a large hole which had gone unnoticed by me for many months. Are you absolutely sure you have never carried something potentially corrosive in the back?
  11. Rabbers

    New rc announced

    Full marks to Lexus for not messing about too much with what remains a great design.
  12. Rabbers

    IS300h Speedo Accuracy.

    At speedometer readings of 50, 80, 100 and 120kmh respectively, the actual speeds of my RC shown by trustworthy Swiss roadside warning cameras, are 47, 74, 94 and 112kmh. Since I used to see the same or very similar differences for the IS300h, 250 and 200, I have never doubted that the margin of error in calibration is intentional - and I was originally somewhat irritated by what I considered an excess of nannyism on Lexus' part. Not that it mattered since I quickly acquired the habit of adding the differences back to the speedometer readings and then making a further upwards adjustment in accordance with what I know to be the official allowance on the posted speed limits. Although these allowances vary from country, what this means is that, if you so choose, you can, at the very minimum, add 10% to Lexus speedometer readings of legal limits without risking a speeding ticket.
  13. Rabbers

    MPG on IS 300h etc.

    Yes, if I adapt the weightings of my driving mix to those of Lexus' declared combined cycle, an 8% consumption difference in favour of the IS is proving close to my own experience. I must admit that, despite awareness of the figures, I have never considered the IS' better cx as a significant contributing factor to lower fuel consumption compared to the RC. While I am not presumptuous enough to challenge Lexus' wind-tunnel tests, my impression from the RC's driver's seat, particularly at higher speeds, has always been of superior aerodynamics if assessed on the basis of quietness and stability. However, given my total ignorance of the science involved, I must conclude that I am guilty of a whole set of highly subjective over-simplifications.
  14. Rabbers

    MPG on IS 300h etc.

    After a few months' ownership of my RC300h (MY2016, F-Sport), I posted some figures relative to its consumption compared with the IS300h (MY2013, Premier) I previously drove (see RC Forum: RC300h Fuel Consumption (v. IS300h), started March 17, 2017, and ...Continued, June 18, 2017). I concluded that the RC consumed something like 9-10% more on normal roads, averaging around 15km/l (=43mpg), and about 14% more, averaging 13km/l (=36.4mpg), on the motorway. Today, with almost 50000km (=31000miles) on the clock, I can broadly confirm the non-motorway figure while finding that I significantly overstated motorway consumption, 14km/l (=39.5mpg) being a truer figure for non-German motorway drives as long as one does not frequently exceed legal limits of 130kmh exemplified by Italy and France to which I personally try, more or less successfully, to adhere. My motorway figure, as posted, was in fact largely based on two autobahn drives the entire length of Germany, since repeated once more with an almost identical result. Keeping to a lower legal limit as that in the UK would, of course, give significantly better economy than in any of the countries mentioned. Be all this as it may, I have been happy to see my RC consumption figures turning out to be closer to those of the IS than I first thought. Measured in terms of visits to the pump the difference is noticeable but certainly not dramatic. Given that the difference is not directly proportionate to that in the kerb weights, I remain at a loss to fully understand why there should be any difference at all. I suspect - though I would probably deny it if pressed - that my habits and style of driving have changed slightly for the worse with ownership of the RC, which, being a coupé, tends to encourage a less sedate and relaxed approach to the road than the IS.
  15. Rabbers

    Wind noise at speed

    ...You may very well think so, but I couldn’t possibly say...
  16. Rabbers

    Wind noise at speed

    Jason: Please take the following purely as an anecdote and not advice. I once had a colleague whose Audi TT had a noisy non-original windscreen, a fact he had not noticed when recently buying what was otherwise a very nice low-mileage car. Confirmation that the noisiness was due to badly- fitted low-quality glass was accompanied by not unexpectedly exorbitant quotes for a replacement by both Audi and a local windscreen specialist. One day soon afterwards I found him grinning all over his face and gleefully pointing to a long crack in the windscreen caused, he said, by a stone on his way to work - and which he had already reported to his insurance company. While naturally sharing his joy at being able to claim 85% of the replacement cost as per the terms of his policy, I was nevertheless left wondering about what must have been the most welcome stone in the history of cracked windscreens.
  17. Rabbers

    Goodbye Is300h F sport

    Great decision 😍! What took you so long?
  18. Having shown up early to collect my car after a service, I remember chatting to the valeting guy while he was finishing cleaning it. I was pleased to learn, never having thought about it before, that his cleaning the ventilator-grilles under the seats was considered a routine part of servicing. I tend to doubt, perhaps wrongly, if his counterparts in other dealerships are all equally conscientious. My conclusion was that formal attention to details of this sort is what distinguishes good dealerships from normal or mediocre ones.
  19. My own thinking when I bought the RC rather than another IS was that I was getting exactly the same powertrain and broadly the same performance in a two-door configuration whose only drawback for many people, but not for me, was the reduced rear cabin space. In other words, I thought I was buying an "IS coupé" which, on the evidence of a test-drive, offered better handling and stability by virtue of a stronger and more rigid chassis whose design happened to be partly based on the GS. Conversely, had my previous car been a GS300h, I doubt if I would have regarded the RC as its coupé version since my original purchase would have been based purely on my need or desire for a bigger size of car than the IS. And, economic considerations aside, had my previous car been a GS450h, I would never have considered buying the RC at all unless I no longer wanted more power as well as size. Apart from two-door cars tending to look better, which may or may not justify the premium asked for them when aesthetics are considered an important factor in terms of marketability, the broadly similar fixed production costs need to be amortised over smaller volumes than those of four-door equivalents, thus dictating higher list-prices if profit margins are to be equalised.
  20. Since I rarely use the cupholders in the RC other than as occasional receptacles for small objects, I have for some time been looking for decent-looking flush-fitting covers, and finally, at a flea-market in Denmark, I came across the ones in the attached photo. As they normally retail for about €20 each (though available online for much less) I happily paid the equivalent of €4 the pair, brand new. They are made of thick-gauge stainless steel lined with rubber, fit perfectly and don’t rattle, and are part of a range of wine accessories called Grand Cru by Rosendahl, where they serve as optional lids for a water-carafe.
  21. Seriously considering unsubscribing Club Lexus after seeing the Stripe-It-All ad they are currently running. I don’t want to sound snobbish but I can’t imagine a more tasteless product for any RC or other Lexus owner 😧 !
  22. Latest iPhone and iPod generations plugged into the USB sockets deliver sound at least as good as memory sticks, a volume setting of 25 being an acceptable minimum for most road surfaces at most speeds with the Pioneer 10-speaker system. This was also my customary setting with ML systems in previous cars, any significant difference in power (and sound quality) being appreciable at higher settings, say 40>, proportionately to the greater number of speakers. Not having played CDs for some years (thus making the slot redundant as far as I'm concerned), I am no longer able to compare them as a direct source. Although Bluetooth 5.0 in the iPhone 8 is a considerable improvement over previous generations in terms of signal strength and clarity, I still find a setting of 30-35 necessary to bring the volume up to plugged-in source equivalence on this device. With specific regard to Dominic's comments about the power of ML sound, I seem to recall that some or maybe all the systems had an ambient- sensitive automatic volume-control feature. I frankly don't remember if it could be switched on or off in the audio settings, though I do remember considering it to be noticeable if not particularly effective. Anyway, it could be the sort of thing that causes a broader problem if it is not working properly. Try driving with the windows down and listen for any volume changes.
  23. Rabbers

    ASC button

    Very probably so. The result was to leave the CVT open to criticism of being so bloodless as to call for an injection of synthetic sound. One can only presume that customer research showed Lexus that a significant number of drivers still prefer noise to silence. Fortunately the ASC switch-off option caters for everybody.
  24. Rabbers

    ASC button

    When Lexus introduced this gimmick on its cars I recall someone suggesting the possible sale as an optional of a more varied soundtrack consisting of your own choice or choices of supercars. I’d be surprised if someone somewhere has not been working on the idea in the forlorn hope of getting an enthusiastic response...
  25. Rabbers

    ASC button

    Acoustic bling. Worth turning on from time to time if the fancy takes you, especially with bored kiddies on board.