Herbie

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Herbie last won the day on November 15

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About Herbie

  • Rank
    Advanced Member

Profile Information

  • First Name
    Herbs
  • Lexus Model
    RX450h
  • Year of Lexus
    2013
  • UK/Ireland Location
    Lancashire

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  1. In a hybrid car the 12V battery only powers the entry/exit system and it boots up the computers that are required to get the hybrid system into the READY state. Once there, the traction battery takes on all starter motor and alternator duties.
  2. Herbie

    OBD question

    I don't understand the question. OBD stands for OnBoard Diagnostics and you can buy OBD readers that will read and clear fault codes. What, exactly, are you asking?
  3. I'm not sure how this came about - perhaps someone failed to remove the relevant passage from the manual or something but I can tell you quite categorically that the engine of the 'donor' or second car does not need to be running when you start the car with the flat battery. With a 'normal' non-hybrid car the starter motor draws a current of at least 300A to crank the engine so it's desirable to have the engine of the second car running to ensure its own battery doesn't suffer and lose charge itself. Because a hybrid car doesn't have a traditional starter motor, the 12V battery in a hybrid car only has to power up the entry/exit system and also power up the computers necessary to get the hybrid system up and running and bring the car to the READY state. As you'll see below, my clamp meter is showing that these systems are drawing a current of just 15.32A from the battery of my RX450h to bring the car to the READY state, which is a hell of a lot less than the 300A or more needed for a normal starter motor, and is low enough that any 12V battery should be able to supply it easily and without the engine of the second car running.
  4. Never used one myself but I believe they do work well. The only drawback is that a vacant frequency in your own area may be in use 10 miles down the road so there could be a need to constantly retune to an empty frequency as you travel up and down the country.
  5. Herbie

    F club cyber security

    Just think how many hundreds of people see your plate every day as you drive around. Even if someone does clone the plate you've got the original, not the clone, so you'll be alright. Nothing to worry about.
  6. Yes, everything works as it should. As you can see that's just a still grab from a Youtube video and it's been a while since I watched it but I'm sure the person doing it said that all things worked afterwards, including the steering wheel controls for volume etc.
  7. Don't forget also that as you drive around, a frequency that's quiet and free in one area may have a radio station operating on it in a different area so you may end up constantly retuning.
  8. Surely it would have been cheaper to replace the CD unit with something like this - I mean, CDs are just SO yesterday anyway 😁
  9. Sorry Peter, can't help except to say that these people are very good to deal with and are reasonably priced.
  10. Herbie

    Black beast

    That's terrible! And you're welcome mate, just keep posting the pictures because this is fascinating.
  11. Herbie

    Black beast

    Loving the transformation! Those DRL switchback LEDs you've got are expensive, more than twice the price I paid on eBay when I got them for my RX300. Anyway, if you want the wiring diagram for the switching relays just let me know. Oh, and make sure that you bolt those resistors to a good metal base to act as a heatsink because they do run hot. I used some MX2 thermal paste on the bottom of them so that there's a very good thermal transfer. Alternatively, you could buy a flasher unit specifically for LEDs like this one and do away with those resistors completely.
  12. Herbie

    Battery Spec

    Yes, they come with a wall-wart to plug into the mains. Have a look at the video on that page, I think it's about 5 minutes long and the guy goes through the various parts and uses.
  13. Hi Chris and congrats on your new motor. I can't answer everything but I can help in a small way. 1. Probably a connection but even if it's the camera itself it can be replaced for about £10 from China via eBay. Someone posted a topic on doing just that very thing a while ago so you should be able to find it with a search. 2. You can't just push a CD in the slot, you have to press the 'Load' button and that then opens the slot for the discs to go in (or at least that was how my non-ML CD worked in my RX300 when I had it. 3. It's possible that it's seized. The battery power screen - we, as the users of the car, never get full access to all the traction battery's capacity. If I remember correctly we get to use about 70 or 80% of the full capacity and it's done this way to ensure that the battery has a long life. If we could fully charge and discharge it, it would very soon give up the ghost. Anyway, given that, the indicator on screen shows us the state of charge of 'our' part of the battery that we get to use. I'm not sure about the 400h but my 450h is divided into eight blue bars. If it gets as low as the last two bars they change from blue to purple and the engine fires up to start charging it. There have been occasions when the indicator has had all eight bars lit up blue, indicating that the traction battery (or our part of it) is fully charged, usually after a long downhill stretch of road, but in normal day-to-day driving it rarely shows full. Hope that helps a bit. EDIT: Here you go:
  14. Herbie

    Battery Spec

    Or just buy one of these or something similar to keep in the glove box or boot.
  15. With the greatest of respect - that's a silly statement and if you genuinely would pay that then one might say that you have too much money burning a hole in your pocket. It's not like you'd even be getting a 'genuine Lexus battery' for that extortionate amount because Lexus don't make batteries! It's a 12V battery, nothing more, nothing less and it's an easy 10 minute job to DIY. Even if you don't want to DIY there's still no need to pay such a ridiculous amount, as the screengrab below from another topic on this very forum shows: