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1st Oilburner


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alright, I've had the IS220D for over 2 weeks now and have just over 600 miles on the odo.

this is my first Lexus as well as first oilburner.

average mpg is 32!

my driving is 40% heavy traffic and 60% fast dual carriageway

I dont think my driving style is best suited for the engine so need to change it sharpish

i usually change up at about a 3.5/4k but reading another post on here is it recommended to change earlier than that?..i'm also finding it hard to adjust to the turbo lag..is that because of my driving style too?

also, and i dont know if this is because the engine is still "tight" but pulling out of junctions in second almost stalls the car. :blush:

any tips/advice appreciated.

lol, reading the above again makes me sound like a complete driving numpty :duh: :blink:

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alright, I've had the IS220D for over 2 weeks now and have just over 600 miles on the odo.

this is my first Lexus as well as first oilburner.

average mpg is 32!

my driving is 40% heavy traffic and 60% fast dual carriageway

I dont think my driving style is best suited for the engine so need to change it sharpish

i usually change up at about a 3.5/4k but reading another post on here is it recommended to change earlier than that?..i'm also finding it hard to adjust to the turbo lag..is that because of my driving style too?

also, and i dont know if this is because the engine is still "tight" but pulling out of junctions in second almost stalls the car. :blush:

any tips/advice appreciated.

lol, reading the above again makes me sound like a complete driving numpty :duh: :blink:

:lol: your engine will loosen up a bit more yet. I find that 1st gear is too short and 6th too tall....

There definately is a dead spot when you change into 2nd. I find staying in first until 18-20mph (3000rpmish) is about right. When you hit 2nd and lift the clutch the revs are at 18-2000ish which means the turbo's still in. You have to run 1st longer than you know you need to...but it's design intent...or in a tent... :huh:

This is the sort of area where the Sport Diesel is better and more relaxed. You can hit 2nd at 15mph and no problems.

Also, 32mpg is lowish...with your sort of commute I would expect mid-high 30's...but this will improve over the next 1000 miles.

It's not terribly good, but on a par with any diesel running 170+bhp...

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alright, I've had the IS220D for over 2 weeks now and have just over 600 miles on the odo.

this is my first Lexus as well as first oilburner.

average mpg is 32!

my driving is 40% heavy traffic and 60% fast dual carriageway

I dont think my driving style is best suited for the engine so need to change it sharpish

i usually change up at about a 3.5/4k but reading another post on here is it recommended to change earlier than that?..i'm also finding it hard to adjust to the turbo lag..is that because of my driving style too?

also, and i dont know if this is because the engine is still "tight" but pulling out of junctions in second almost stalls the car. :blush:

any tips/advice appreciated.

lol, reading the above again makes me sound like a complete driving numpty :duh: :blink:

Change gear earlier unless you are pushing it...I change around 2000 - 2500 rpm in normal driving.

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alright, I've had the IS220D for over 2 weeks now and have just over 600 miles on the odo.

this is my first Lexus as well as first oilburner.

average mpg is 32!

my driving is 40% heavy traffic and 60% fast dual carriageway

I dont think my driving style is best suited for the engine so need to change it sharpish

i usually change up at about a 3.5/4k but reading another post on here is it recommended to change earlier than that?..i'm also finding it hard to adjust to the turbo lag..is that because of my driving style too?

also, and i dont know if this is because the engine is still "tight" but pulling out of junctions in second almost stalls the car. :blush:

any tips/advice appreciated.

lol, reading the above again makes me sound like a complete driving numpty :duh: :blink:

I have mine (220d with MM ) for the last month and would agree completely with your comments. I am getting around 38/40 mpg around Dublin which is pretty good but I also have stalled mine a few times at low revs. I suppose I will get used to it and have now decided to put the rev counter marker at 3000 revs and will not change gear untill it comes on in the low gears. Hopefully it will loosen out as Jamboo says. Otherwise it is a beautifull car, far superior to the C Class I had before it . In fact one of my mates has ordered one on looking at it. As I mentioned in a previous post the only gripe I have is the age of the software in the sat/nav and the fact that over here we do not have the facility to be diverted away from traffic congestion. The software in the sat/nav is so old that the other day while driving down the M50 (your M25 except ours is a bigger carpark, we've got a toll booth at one end) I looked at my sat/nav and panicked as I realised that I had obviously left the road a la Harry Potter as I was, according to my sat/nav in the middle of a big field. Now this is plain crazy as this road was opened years ago. So I think I will be taking up the matter with my garage. Also, a couple of weeks ago I was going to a meeting and set the sat/nav for the place I was going to which was on the POI . Guess what, the sat/nav took me elsewhere, got me lost and I was dead late for the meeting which I only reached at all by ringing a guy on my wonderfull hands free bluetooth system and was guided in by phone. To really make a laugh of the situation, on my way home, ( about ten miles from the meeting place) the nice lady interupted whatever I was listening to with the remark " you have reached your destination". She was lucky she was not in the car or she would have had a long walk home. So a big thumbs down for the sat/nav.

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Barry - that sounds terrible...but you know what the dealer will say..."...there's nothing we can do about it, as the data is supplied by teleatlas (or whoever)..."

Mine was constantly driving me through buildings, fields etc...in the end the unit was replaced under warranty.

I'd get the dealer to check out the whole unit, not just the disc...sounds like you've got more than just an out of date disc.

PS A colleague has jost got an Audi A4 170bhp TDI company car - first tank full average trip showed 44mpg (actual was 39mpg) which was lots of idling but a good motorway run till empty (480 miles). A gorgeous car, but having had the 130bhp version before and the Lex now, even he agrees with me that mine is better than the Audi!!!

Very similar performance and drive, though the gearing is better.

Agree with you about superiority of the car - other than the interior issues (quality and space) the Lex is an absolute gem...

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