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Hi, anyone knows which tool to use for removing and fitting the oilfilter from the IS300h?

Like the one using in this video at 16:00 min

 

 

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Hi Jason thanks, i still have this one from my CT200h so it fits also on the IS300H?

I did not try it yet.

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Interesting that Lexus use a replaceable filter element rather than a  self contained cartridge. Haven't seen one of those for decades. I even converted my 1958 sports car to the cartridge system about 10 years ago. Anyone know about the pros and cons?

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2 reasons i can imagine.

Cheap and easier to recycle.

Cartridge and spin-on

Early engine oil filters were of cartridge (or replaceable element) construction, in which a permanent housing contains a replaceable filter element or cartridge. The housing is mounted either directly on the engine or remotely with supply and return pipes connecting it to the engine. In the mid-1950s, the spin-on oil filter design was introduced: a self-contained housing and element assembly which was to be unscrewed from its mount, discarded, and replaced with a new one. This made filter changes more convenient and potentially less messy, and quickly came to be the dominant type of oil filter installed by the world's automakers. Conversion kits were offered for vehicles originally equipped with cartridge-type filters. In the 1990s, European and Asian automakers in particular began to shift back in favor of replaceable-element filter construction, because it generates less waste with each filter change. American automakers have likewise begun to shift to replaceable-cartridge filters, and retrofit kits to convert from spin-on to cartridge-type filters are offered for popular applications. Commercially available automotive oil filters vary in their design, materials, and construction details. Ones that are made from completely synthetic material excepting the metal drain cylinders contained within are far superior and longer lasting than the traditional cardboard/cellulose/paper type that still predominate. These variables affect the efficacy, durability, and cost of the filter


 
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Thanks for that, Vagtech, I guessed that it was to reduce waste but didn't know that there was a general trend away from spin-on. I changed my MGA the other way as it was a very awkward job to remove and replace the element housing due to restricted access. I once owned a 1932 Standard Little Nine on which oil filtration was provided by a vertical cylinder of steel gauze inside the sump which was attached to the sump drain plug and into which the oil pump inlet pipe dipped. Ingenious but not sure how effective it was. Those were the days of thick white metal bearings though which were probably more tolerant of dirt.

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Hi Jason thanks, i still have this one from my CT200h so it fits also on the IS300H?
I did not try it yet.

Yes the basic design of the filter housings is the same, however the 300h has a filter drain plug that allows you to drain the filter housing before loosening it, quite a handy thing.


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Thanks Jason, so i don't need a new one. Drain the filter housing i saw on the video, seems like a nice and clean job to do.

Cheers,

Ivo

 

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