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Ray's Wheels Japan


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I know we complain about the OEM wheels, and rightly so, but it seems some of the alternative alloys aren't so different. I imported a set of Volks Racing SF Winning three piece forged rims from Ray's Wheels in japan, these:

volksboxch3.jpg

volks19x95reardh7.jpg

They've been on the car for approximately 6 months but after slightly kerbing the fronts I took them to Andy Styles of Wheel Styles for refurb. http://www.wheelstyles.co.uk/pages/about.htm After disassembling the rims, cleaning and degreasing it was evident that although the outer polished rims were protected, the inner rim was bare machined alloy that had already started to pit due to brake dust and presumably the winter salt. :angry:

So kerbing the fronts had some advantage as all the rims have now been prepped, polished and protected ALL OVER with several coats of etch laquer. Had I left them on the car the pitting may have gone beyond recoverable.

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I know we complain about the OEM wheels, and rightly so, but it seems some of the alternative alloys aren't so different. I imported a set of Volks Racing SF Winning three piece forged rims from Ray's Wheels in japan, these:

volksboxch3.jpg

volks19x95reardh7.jpg

They've been on the car for approximately 6 months but after slightly kerbing the fronts I took them to Andy Styles of Wheel Styles for refurb. http://www.wheelstyles.co.uk/pages/about.htm After disassembling the rims, cleaning and degreasing it was evident that although the outer polished rims were protected, the inner rim was bare machined alloy that had already started to pit due to brake dust and presumably the winter salt. :angry:

So kerbing the fronts had some advantage as all the rims have now been prepped, polished and protected ALL OVER with several coats of etch laquer. Had I left them on the car the pitting may have gone beyond recoverable.

corrosion on non ferrous metal is a protective property of the metal, once coated actually protects the metal, although it doesnt look good it is a natural process when exposed to air

i have a set of racing hearts, wedsports and BBS none of them have any protection on the inside :whistling:

the difference in the majority of OEM and aftermarket wheels is that they are painted and not bare alloy

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Wouldn't have thought that Rays/Volk wheels would allow this to happen to their wheels. Even if it is a natural reaction as you say Barrie, it shouldn't happen. I know the price of these wheels and they aren't cheap. You would expect them to stay looking good inside and out.

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@ Bazza - Oxidisation is a more accurate word, and as you rightly say once built up it protects the parent metal from exposure to oxygen preventing further damage.

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@ Bazza - Oxidisation is a more accurate word, and as you rightly say once built up it protects the parent metal from exposure to oxygen preventing further damage.

Barry, you are referring to the corrosion resistence of the passivation layer that aluminium alloys have. I'm talking about pitting corrosion which is caused by very localised galvanic action as the result of a lack of oxygen round a very small area. Unfortunately alloys resistent to uniform corrosion like low alloy steels are a lot more resistant to pitting corrosion whereas alloys that build up a passivation layer are very susceptible (aluminium alloys and stainless steels especially). Pitting corrosion and crevice corrosion is very similar and we suffer a lot from it in the oil industry, especially in saline environments e.g. offshore platforms. Until my wheels were cleaned I was unaware of the problem because the pits were hidden by corrosion product. Pitting corrosion can cause severe problems deep in the structure of the material, even though outwardly it doesn't look much. The only way to stop it is to protect the surface with coatings. Polished surfaces tend to suffer less because it needs a certain surface roughness to initiate it...like a machined surface.

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@ Bazza - Oxidisation is a more accurate word, and as you rightly say once built up it protects the parent metal from exposure to oxygen preventing further damage.

Barry, you are referring to the corrosion resistence of the passivation layer that aluminium alloys have. I'm talking about pitting corrosion which is caused by very localised galvanic action as the result of a lack of oxygen round a very small area. Unfortunately alloys resistent to uniform corrosion like low alloy steels are a lot more resistant to pitting corrosion whereas alloys that build up a passivation layer are very susceptible (aluminium alloys and stainless steels especially). Pitting corrosion and crevice corrosion is very similar and we suffer a lot from it in the oil industry, especially in saline environments e.g. offshore platforms. Until my wheels were cleaned I was unaware of the problem because the pits were hidden by corrosion product. Pitting corrosion can cause severe problems deep in the structure of the material, even though outwardly it doesn't look much. The only way to stop it is to protect the surface with coatings. Polished surfaces tend to suffer less because it needs a certain surface roughness to initiate it...like a machined surface.

i stand corrected and informed

i thank you :)

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