johnatg

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johnatg last won the day on November 17 2018

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About johnatg

  • Rank
    Established Member

Profile Information

  • First Name
    John
  • Gender
    Male
  • Lexus Model
    IS250
  • Year of Lexus
    2006
  • UK/Ireland Location
    Cheshire
  • Interests
    Classic Cars
    General Automotive
    Motorsport & Racing
    Computers & Electronics

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  1. Indeed - I had a rear lining detach like that on a Pug 205 of my wife's years ago - ended up destroying the brake hub in getting it off. So yes - I do agree, they need checking and possibly replacing even on cars where the rear shoes only operate as a parking brake.
  2. The front calipers only have one piston - they slide (and seize) just like the rears. But the slide pins are effectively bolts and have hexagons, so you can release them with a suitable spanner and if necessary a bit of wellie. Also they are less likely to seize than the rears as they do more work so keep moving more. Rear shoes shouldn't wear at all - they only wear if you drive off with the parking brake applied. You never do that, do you? 😉
  3. I clean mine with liquid metal polish (or paste such as Solvol Autosol) about twice a year, followed by a coat of wax (as used for bodywork paint protection. My 13 year old lights are perfectly clear - car is parked outside facing North-ish. Sent from my PSP7551DUO using Tapatalk
  4. Nope - just click 'em on and away you go. Re Denso - Denso are to Japanese cars what Lucas (King of Darkness) was to British cars. But most of you are probably too young to remember! Denso are what Lexus and most other Japanese makers fit for electrical and some other items. Sent from my PSP7551DUO using Tapatalk
  5. Correct and likewise - mine were £17.50 in the end of month ECP discount deal. Sent from my PSP7551DUO using Tapatalk
  6. All sound advice. Re pad mileage - 13k miles isn't totally unreasonable - IS250 etc does tend to be a bit heavy on rear pads (And front ones - expect to need a change at anything over 15k miles. Sent from my PSP7551DUO using Tapatalk
  7. Standard (rare) and SE don't have sat nav or lcd screen or rear window blind and the mirrors don't tilt every time you select reverse. And problems with most of these are hardly isolated or one off on here. Sent from my PSP7551DUO using Tapatalk
  8. Re electric / electronic probs - plenty of examples on here - sat nav, lcd screes, rear window blinds, auto mirror tilt mechanisms, etc - and as a car gets to 14, 15 years and more old you must expect them to potentially get more common. OK for us with plenty of value from our cars already - but buying now in expectation of a reasonable service life and on a budget? Sent from my PSP7551DUO using Tapatalk
  9. There aren't really any issues with early cars which don't also affect later ones - not that there are any major issues anyway. Main thing is brake calipers, especially the sliders - but they all have the same maintenance requirements. Very early cars have solid rear brake discs - they were changed to vented in 2007 but it doesn't make any great difference. Older cars are just...well..older. Main thing is specs - they changed pretty well every year in some respect or other, even in minor ways such as the trim levels and colours available. People on here always say to get the top specs - SE-L etc. But consider - then you get a lot more electronic stuff to potentially go wrong. It's a lot more irritating to have some equipment not working than to not have it at all. I've had my 2006 SE for 7 years now. I did have a serious problem with a body ecu - I suspect due to a chafed wiring loom - but apart from that - nothing.
  10. Prompted by that to do a bit more research, I find that the KR 3 cylinder petrol engine used in the Aygo, 107 and C1 was, in fact, designed by Daihatsu in the early 2000s and has been used in a whole lot of Daihatsu and Toyota cars (NB Daihatsu no longer sell cars in Europe).. Daihatsu started cooperating with Toyota in 1967 and Toyota obtained a controlling interest in 1998. The company became a wholly-owned subsidiary of Toyota in 2016. As far as the relevance between models goes - I have for several years used Dexos2 spec oils in all my vehicles (or those I have looked after) ranging from Ford Ka through various VW, Saab, Mercedes, Peugeot, Honda, Mazda and Lexus cars and including my Tecumseh-engined lawnmower. The actual product Dexos2 (5W30) is a GM oil recommended for use in all GM vehicles (petrol and diesel in Europe - Dexos1 is recommended for petrol vehicles in USA) from the Opel/Vauxhall Adam (no longer GM of course) to the most extreme Corvette. I figured that if it covered all them it wouldn't do any harm in my limited range. I used actual GM Dexos2 for a long time, but during the last couple of years have switched to UK-manufactured Exol Optima LSG, because it is Dexos2 spec and you can buy 20 litres for £59.95. I have never, ever, had any engine lubrication problems. It is fully synthetic 5W30 and meets lots of other specs (VW, Mercedes, BMW etc) as well. The only time I can think of where I wouldn't use it is in modern Ford engines which require 0w30 oil to Ford specs.
  11. 0W20 is there to give slightly better fuel economy - mainly for getting CO2 emissions down. 5W30 gives better engine protection - and is a lot cheaper and with more choice than 0W20. I'm not sure who was mainly responsible for the Aygo engine design and manufacture, but I suspect that there wasn't much Toyota involvement - the car is largely a PSA (Peugeot/Citroen) product and Toyota piggy-backed into it. The whole family (Aygo/C1/107) is made in the same production facility in the Czech Republic. So the oil it uses it pretty irrelevant to Toyota and Lexus.
  12. Yep - it's not that tight - all the original fittings can be kept. Sent from my PSP7551DUO using Tapatalk
  13. That's the correct battery and as you suggest the terminals go at the back with + nearest the engine and - close to the wing. It's a fairly tight fit but everything is correct - watch out for the temperature sensor between battery and engine - you need to disconnect it to get the old battery out and reconnect it once the new battery is in place.
  14. That's the correct battery and as you suggest the terminals go at the back with + nearest the engine and - close to the wing. It's a fairly tight fit but everything is correct - watch out for the temperature sensor between battery and engine - you need to disconnect it to get the old battery out and reconnect it once the new battery is in place.
  15. Indeed - I came across a large herd of them on the road one foggy night around midnight about 20 years ago on the descent towards Braemar - unnerving! I once hit a deer about 40 years ago on the Lang Whang - it wasn't pretty, either for the deer nor the car. Sent from my PSP7551DUO using Tapatalk