cleverdick

Grease For Anti-roll Bar Bushes: What To Use?

Recommended Posts

Not sure what to use. Obviously it has to be something that's compatible with rubber (unless they are made of PVC).

The creaking is driving me mad. I've used silicone grease on them before, with some success, but its effectiveness doesn't last.

I shall be renewing the bushes anyway, because the ridges have worn down, so new grease will be applied on assembly. Interestingly, the book doesn't say to use anything!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You should replace the bushes and never use any grease of any kind.

Clean the anti roll bar area where the bushes fit.

For some cars you can get bushes made from a different material that is harder and last a lot longer than the original.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a temporary measure (until I get the new bushes), I have lubricated them with Toyota lithium soap base grease. It says on the tube "rubber G". It has eliminated the creaking. I take on board what you say about leaving them dry, but what would be the harm in using grease if it doesn't degrade the rubber?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The rubber bushes fitted to the anti roll bar are designed to be in continuous stationary contact with the bar and the bush holder/cradle.

As the bar moves about its axes due to the road surface, the bush inner mass is continuously forced by the bar to follow these fluctuations while the bush's surface in contact with the bar and the holder/cradle are in stationary contact.

When you brake, certain rubber suspension bushes, including the ones in question, are progressively deformed to their design parameters to alter the steering geometry thereby increasing braking and simultaneously reducing the braking distance.

Worn bushes, including the ones in question, alter the steering geometry thereby causing poor road holding and accelerate front tire wear and tear.

The only grease that preserves rubber, is silicon grease. [ Application on constant velocity joints, brake calliper dust seals etc. ]

However, in this instance, using grease, is simply against the design principle!

I hope the foregoing is of help to you.

Kindest regards,

Chris.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All the steering geometry parameters, toe in or toe out, camber and caster angles, are progressively altered to their pre determined limits to increase the rolling resistance of the front wheels, hence increase braking and reduce braking distance.

Any deviation from the design values of the steering geometry will impair road holding but when braking hard to avoid danger or an impact, safety becomes first priority and under these circumstances, road holding does not matter much since it is only temporary for a very short distance or time.

Any grease other than silicon will damage the rubber and cause further deterioration. This will increase the gap around the anti roll bar and make things worse.

Regards,

Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are other greases that don't damage rubber, red rubber grease for example, not just silicon grease. However the point is correct, the bushes shouldn't be lubricated as you don't want the suspension component moving within the bushing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As has been said, no grease should be applied. Once the new bushes are on, noises will stop.

Sent from my Iphone using Lexus OC

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for replies so far.

I collected the new bushes today. They are nothing like the ones on the car now! For a start, they're obviously made of natural rubber, looking more substantial with wider shoulders. Most importantly, they are lined with what appears to be woven glass-fibre fabric. Clearly they are not intended to be greased. So I now wonder if the ones currently in use are in fact OEM.

The only problem I can foresee with the new ones is the final tightening of the bolts at normal ride height - not sure how easy access will be. I intend to do the work next week, along with an oil and filter change.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fit the new bushes, preferably original or by an original equipment manufacturer and leave the anti roll bar free to move within them.

Lower the car to stand free on its wheels and then tighten the bushes.

Clean the anti roll bar from any grease or old rubber.

God luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have replaced my old sway bar bushes with nolathan bushes the reason why I changed them was because there is a knocking noise from the front left side removing the old ones showed the left side bushes totally worn so I replaced both bushes with the new ones but the knocking noise is still there! Any help on this is much appreciated

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Club Hybrid Poll

  • 313 Hybrid Reliability

    1. 1. If you were to consider buying a Hybrid model over 5 years old, would you be worried about the reliability of the Hybrid system?


      • Not really as Hybrid systems are always reliable
      • Not if it had a Manufacturers Warranty on the Hybrid system
      • I would not buy a Hybrid model over 5 years old