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I have a 2018 NX Fsport with a spacesaver spare wheel. Should the spacesaver wheel have its own set of wheel nuts that are different length from the alloy wheel nuts, or does the one set of nuts fit both ??  

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3 hours ago, Gordon McLea said:

I have a 2018 NX Fsport with a spacesaver spare wheel. Should the spacesaver wheel have its own set of wheel nuts that are different length from the alloy wheel nuts, or does the one set of nuts fit both ??  

I have had occasion to use my spacesaver and it simply involved removing the damaged wheel and fitting the spacesaver on.  As it happened I had run-flats on but I preferred to use the emergency wheel.

I don’t imagine that your model will be any different.  And it’s a whole lot better than using the injectable gunk system!

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Anybody know if the injectable liquid is wahs away with water possible or does it contain latex making an awful mess out of everything?

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45 minutes ago, Las Palmas said:

Anybody know if the injectable liquid is wahs away with water possible or does it contain latex making an awful mess out of everything?

I think the answer is...yes!

As I understand it, the injectable substance is a water-based latex foam.  So presuming that the leak/puncture is small enough to be blocked by the sealant, it could be repaired by a tyre specialist.

However it’s a messy and time consuming job to clean the latex out of the tyre, which is why many - if not most - won’t do it.  I imagine the valve might also have to be replaced, having had latex squirted through it.  Which is an additional cost if it involves a TPMS valve.

If the problem is any serious gash or rip - especially in the sidewall - then these inflation kits are useless.

I’m sure a spacesaver wheel is the best emergency option, but if there’s any chance that the driver was not able to change a wheel, then an inflation kit might be the only solution, so’s to speak.

 

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8 hours ago, LenT said:

I think the answer is...yes!

As I understand it, the injectable substance is a water-based latex foam.  So presuming that the leak/puncture is small enough to be blocked by the sealant, it could be repaired by a tyre specialist.

However it’s a messy and time consuming job to clean the latex out of the tyre, which is why many - if not most - won’t do it.  I imagine the valve might also have to be replaced, having had latex squirted through it.  Which is an additional cost if it involves a TPMS valve.

 

That is what I was afraid of. Stupid that Lexus is using latex as there are more suitable sealants for sealing tyres. Quadboss is used for off road 4x4 buggies and trucks and it is washable with just water. I know as I have used it for mountain bike the last more than 10 years. it seals everything up to 6mm. Have had 3 thorns in a tyre and noticed nothing till I got home and saw the thorns and a little bubble of whatever it was from the sealant. Like all other sealants this is no good for long tears but little holes from flintstones, glass, nails, rocks and whatever that makes no larger than 6mm holes will be sealed immediately.

image.thumb.png.e2b67c160eaaa0f17cc038d087697ebd.png

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26 minutes ago, Las Palmas said:

 Stupid that Lexus is using latex as there are more suitable sealants for sealing tyres. Quadboss is used for off road 4x4 buggies and trucks and it is washable with just water.

 

I had never heard of Quadboss but looking it up I see that it works in a very different way to the emergency injectable kits.  Unless I am mistaken (always a possibility) it appears to be a preventative measure injected into the tyre, after removing the valve, and then re-inflating the tyre.  So it coats the inside of the tyre ready to block any leak, being forced out of the hole by the tyre pressure.

The emergency inflatable kits are only introduced after the hole has happened.  They are claimed to both re-inflate the tyre and seal the leak.  So my surmise is that Lexus - and indeed any car maker - would say that that was a tyre makers' problem, not the car makers'.  Perhaps the ideal answer would be the introduction of the self-sealing tyre!

My personal preference, as I am still capable of changing a wheel, is to have some sort of spare wheel - full size or spacesaver, it doesn't matter - rather than rely on an emergency injectable.

It also occurs to me that if I was to use, say, Quadboss, would that affect the attitude of the tyre maker should there later be a fault with the tyre?

And if Quadboss works by coating and sealing the inside of the tyre, what affect does it have on the expensive TPMS valve?

 

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22 minutes ago, LenT said:

I had never heard of Quadboss but looking it up I see that it works in a very different way to the emergency injectable kits.  Unless I am mistaken (always a possibility) it appears to be a preventative measure injected into the tyre, after removing the valve, and then re-inflating the tyre.  So it coats the inside of the tyre ready to block any leak, being forced out of the hole by the tyre pressure.

The emergency inflatable kits are only introduced after the hole has happened.  They are claimed to both re-inflate the tyre and seal the leak.  So my surmise is that Lexus - and indeed any car maker - would say that that was a tyre makers' problem, not the car makers'.  Perhaps the ideal answer would be the introduction of the self-sealing tyre!

My personal preference, as I am still capable of changing a wheel, is to have some sort of spare wheel - full size or spacesaver, it doesn't matter - rather than rely on an emergency injectable.

It also occurs to me that if I was to use, say, Quadboss, would that affect the attitude of the tyre maker should there later be a fault with the tyre?

And if Quadboss works by coating and sealing the inside of the tyre, what affect does it have on the expensive TPMS valve?

 

You have a bigger car and room for a spare wheel. A CT200h does not.

The sealant is to be put in the wheels before, but it does a good job after a puncture too. Remove the valve stem, use the tube (that come with the sealant) it fit over the valve and pour in the half litre. Put the valve stem back in place and if you know where the hole is, turn the wheel till the hole points down. If you do not know where the hole is it probably is not that big. Inflate the tyre, drive a couple of kilometres and control if tyre pressure is still ok, if needed add some pressure. It is meant to last a race in desert with thorns and sharp stones so probably will be able to get the car to a place where a new tyre can be put on.

The sealant has brought me home from tours where thorns (big ones we have here) are abundant and the lava rubble is often sharp as razorblades. Most bikers with tubes have needed new tubes or repairing the tubes. The only time I had to walk home with tubeless sealant was before I knew the Quadboss and I was using the latex that many still use. In a mountain bike latex often seal the hole, but in warm climate it dries out in a couple of months and new sealant is to be injected. If latex comes spraying to your clothes (hole in rear tyre) it cannot be washed out.

 

It can be washed away with water. No trace on the tyre, so probably no trace on the TPMS valve. Probably less damaging than the latex. Washed it off after having it in the wheel more than a year.

Should I get a leak I will use the Quadboss instead of the impossible to clean latex mixture. On top of that I have used Quadboss that was more than 5 years old on the bike and it was still functioning.

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1 hour ago, Las Palmas said:

You have a bigger car and room for a spare wheel. A CT200h does not.

The sealant is to be put in the wheels before, but it does a good job after a puncture too. Remove the valve stem, use the tube (that come with the sealant) it fit over the valve and pour in the half litre. Put the valve stem back in place and if you know where the hole is, turn the wheel till the hole points down. If you do not know where the hole is it probably is not that big. Inflate the tyre, drive a couple of kilometres and control if tyre pressure is still ok, if needed add some pressure. It is meant to last a race in desert with thorns and sharp stones so probably will be able to get the car to a place where a new tyre can be put on.

The sealant has brought me home from tours where thorns (big ones we have here) are abundant and the lava rubble is often sharp as razorblades. Most bikers with tubes have needed new tubes or repairing the tubes. The only time I had to walk home with tubeless sealant was before I knew the Quadboss and I was using the latex that many still use. In a mountain bike latex often seal the hole, but in warm climate it dries out in a couple of months and new sealant is to be injected. If latex comes spraying to your clothes (hole in rear tyre) it cannot be washed out.

 

It can be washed away with water. No trace on the tyre, so probably no trace on the TPMS valve. Probably less damaging than the latex. Washed it off after having it in the wheel more than a year.

Should I get a leak I will use the Quadboss instead of the impossible to clean latex mixture. On top of that I have used Quadboss that was more than 5 years old on the bike and it was still functioning.        
 

 

I can see that you are an enthusiast, John, and speak from experience.   And there’s obviously no reason why you can’t use Quadboss if you want to.  But your original question was...why wasn’t Lexus using this or a similar product?

As I mentioned earlier, my car has a spacesaver which I used because a helpful lad had snapped the valve off the tyre.  Clearly no internal tyre solution would have solved that! 

Now as I understand it, you say that you can introduce Quadboss after you have discovered a puncture, so it’s a cure as well as a preventative.  But surely that would also require Lexus to provide a valve removal tool and a means of reinflating the tyre, such as a pump or compressed air cylinder.  

So isn’t that going to make the process more complicated for the ordinary Lexus driver, rather than cleaner and simpler?  It might be acceptable to the enthusiast but less so to the buyer of what’s marketed as a luxury brand.

The rationale for Lexus - and other car makers - for going the inflatable injection route and ditching the tyre is generally given as weight and space saving.  And I wouldn’t be surprised if cost came in somewhere.  But if Quadboss and similar products could be packaged and delivered in the same way as the current kits provided, then presumably they could be sold to Lexus.

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Enthusiast: No, just lazy and do not want to do something not necessary.

My original question was what kind of sealant Lexus is using. After you told me that it is latex based, I just thought that it is stupid to use something that clogs up the whole system and is almost impossible to clean.

I use Quadboss on mountain bike and there it is easy to remove the valve stem. On other cars I have had, valve stem is easy to remove. Never looked at it on our car but supposed that the valve stem was same as on all other valves and not special Lexus needing a special tool to remove it.

Looked it up and found  TPMS Sensor Valve Stem Service Kit for Toyota

image.png.edd7532511c5bdfa1b763cbd40c9035a.png   image.png.da20427fa6b882a5e959134c2571c11d.png    image.png.45f0b2abc848ccc88a8f499c9578bc9d.png

Looks to me like all the other valve stems I have seen.

Is it not needed to take out the valve stem before using the inflation kit that is in the CT? Latex will definitely clog up the valve stem and make it less valuable after use meaning a new need to be put in if latex has been pressed through it.

Is the valve stem in Lexus different to other Schrader valve stems?

Another question: How often are batteries for TPMS system to be changed? Suppose they do not last forever or are being charged by the rotation of the wheels? That would be smart.

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1 hour ago, Las Palmas said:

Enthusiast: No, just lazy and do not want to do something not necessary.

Gets my vote. 🙂

1 hour ago, Las Palmas said:

My original question was what kind of sealant Lexus is using. After you told me that it is latex based, I just thought that it is stupid to use something that clogs up the whole system and is almost impossible to clean.

Precisely why I’ve not accepted one when it came with the car.  

1 hour ago, Las Palmas said:
1 hour ago, Las Palmas said:

 

Looked it up and found  TPMS Sensor Valve Stem Service Kit for Toyota

 

image.png.edd7532511c5bdfa1b763cbd40c9035a.png   image.png.da20427fa6b882a5e959134c2571c11d.png    image.png.45f0b2abc848ccc88a8f499c9578bc9d.png

 

Looks to me like all the other valve stems I have seen.

 

But sadly nothing like the one I had to replace.  Six dollars!  I wish!  The whole of the visible portion of the valve was snapped off and the replacement with an equivalent unit was £75.

1 hour ago, Las Palmas said:

Looked it up and found  TPMS Sensor Valve Stem Service Kit for Toyota

Is it not needed to take out the valve stem before using the inflation kit that is in the CT? Latex will definitely clog up the valve stem and make it less valuable after use meaning a new need to be put in if latex has been pressed through it.

 

Taking out the valve stem would make it impossible to inflate the tyre and keep it inflated while injecting the repair solution.  

In fact my manual (Page 434) also warns that using liquid sealants may make the TPMS unit inoperable!

So why do they provide one instead of a tyre, I hear you ask!?

1 hour ago, Las Palmas said:

 

Another question: How often are batteries for TPMS system to be changed? Suppose they do not last forever or are being charged by the rotation of the wheels? That would be smart.

It’s stated that these batteries may last between 5 and 10 years - which is quite a broad range.   Changing the batteries would involve removing and breaking down the TPMS unit and that would not interest the average owner - like myself!

 As for your charging idea, well that sounds a bit like my self-winding watch movement.  If it can be shown to be cheaper than occasionally replacing the whole unit...you may have a money spinner there.

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1 hour ago, LenT said:

Taking out the valve stem would make it impossible to inflate the tyre and keep it inflated while injecting the repair solution.  

 

As for your charging idea, well that sounds a bit like my self-winding watch movement.  If it can be shown to be cheaper than occasionally replacing the whole unit...you may have a money spinner there.

Putting the valve stem back again after the sealant is in of course before adding air in the tyre (with Quadboss). I see no reason to have the valve in while putting liquid into the tyre.

Cheap calculators that have a capacitor and a tiny Battery in them and the capacitor is charged by something moving while shaking the calculator (makes a noise while doing it) has been around since more than 20 years. It is not my idea. It comes with a penalty of course, added weight.

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Just thought about the thing a moment and found a very simple solution for both problems.

First, there is no reason whatsoever for having the TPMS in the place where air (and whatever sealant is used) is injected into the tyre.

Second, charging is not really more complicated than first: Making a charger that can use the change in rotational speed of the wheels to produce electricity.

Both - very simple. Should not need a genius to figure that out. Why Lexus / Toyota or somebody else have not made that yet is the hard thing to understand.

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26 minutes ago, Las Palmas said:

Putting the valve stem back again after the sealant is in of course before adding air in the tyre (with Quadboss). I see no reason to have the valve in while putting liquid into the tyre.

As I say, I haven’t used a tyre inflation kit and have no plans to do so.  But perhaps this video will make things clearer.

It features Richard Seymour, no less, who is - or possibly was - Product & Technical Specialist, Lexus UK.

He is demonstrating the use of the tyre inflation kit.  It clarifies the point that the tyre inflator is run off the power socket and injects the sealant through the valve.  
 

 

 

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6 minutes ago, LenT said:

As I say, I haven’t used a tyre inflation kit and have no plans to do so.  But perhaps this video will make things clearer.

It features Richard Seymour, no less, who is - or possibly was - Product & Technical Specialist, Lexus UK.

He is demonstrating the use of the tyre inflation kit.  It clarifies the point that the tyre inflator is run off the power socket and injects the sealant through the valve.  
 

 

 

Same system as in the Smart Roadster Coupé 2003-04 we had and not really smart to inject latex through the TPMS sensor. He did not mention that.

Still not his fault. Just did what he was supposed to do.

So should we need to use sealant, first thing to do is to find out if the valve stem is removable and then empty the latex in a bottle and fill a latex-free sealant in the tyre, then put the valve stem back on and let the compressor do it's job.

If you tell me there is not a removable valve stem insert (below is a standard valve stem insert that is easy to screw out so liquid can come into the tyre:

https://roadbikeaction.com/wp-content/contentimages/Michael/Five%20Things/valve%20comparison.jpg

in the Lexus without a special Lexus tool then it may not be possible unless it can be bought cheap. But why they use latex is so stupid it is hard to understand.

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image.png.b2e342ef7de186206e947b5e099ffcfe.png

Sorry I did not make it clear that it of course is not the valve stem that is to take out, only the core insert.

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