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Wrapping - good idea?


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I guess it depends on what you are trying to achieve.

One thing to consider is insurance companies - many don't like wrapped cars, some don't even like PPF, and will either increase premiums or refuse to quote 

 

PS I created this a specific thread, rather than tagging into the reply you initially made.

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If you are going for something different, wrapping is the way... 😎:punk:

maxresdefault.jpg

If you want to freshen up tired paintwork, the prep work is likely to far outstrip the wrapping costs!

Be aware reversing (unwrapping) the car to original can sometimes end up with even more work to make it presentable.

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1 hour ago, PeteTP said:

Hello,

Perhaps wrong thread but here goes. Any thoughts on whether wrapping a car is a good idea?

TIA.

PeteTP


I think this has cropped up recently.  When I had my car ‘Detailed’ I considered the option of having the front wrapped, as extra protection from small stone chips.  But I do so few miles that the risk seemed relatively small compared to the extra cost.

But if it’s affordable, then I think it has several advantages.  The film definitely provides more protection and is self-healing to a degree.  It can be easily removed and replaced.  It helps to  protect the original - or new ceramic - finish.

One downside is that the surface it’s applied to has to be very carefully prepared.  Any flaws will most likely be magnified.

The Detailer who did my car is a wrapping enthusiast, so I thought referencing his product page might give you more information.

https://www.huntsmiths.co.uk/xpel-paint-protection-film/

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All of the above plus, I think I read somewhere that the wraps only last two to three years but I could well be wrong on that. Just seems like a hell of a lot of money to lose over three years if it is true.

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3 minutes ago, Herbie said:

All of the above plus, I think I read somewhere that the wraps only last two to three years but I could well be wrong on that. Just seems like a hell of a lot of money to lose over three years if it is true.

Depends on the quality of the product and how well it is looked after but you should expect 5 years - but the point is well made, it isn't as long lasting as the original paint.

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5 minutes ago, ColinBarber said:

Depends on the quality of the product and how well it is looked after but you should expect 5 years - but the point is well made, it isn't as long lasting as the original paint.

Well I would point out that the product I referenced apparently comes with a 10 year warranty - although I expect that also comes with several qualifications.

24 minutes ago, ColinBarber said:

One thing to consider is insurance companies - many don't like wrapped cars, some don't even like PPF, and will either increase premiums or refuse to quote .

This is a good point that didn’t really occur to me.  I can see that if the wrap’s a distinct colour or decorative change, then may be it also has to be registered as such.  But I would think it’s worth checking out first with the Insurers.

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Gentlemen 

Many thanks for your sound and thought provoking advice. I will continue to mull over this. I’m c. 90/10 against but child 1 thinks it’s a great idea. Guess who’s not paying?!

TVM

PeteTP

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Had a van wrapped a few years ago and when it was redeployed elsewhere in the company at c100k miles the wrapping was removed to reveal pristine paintwork.

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Las Palmas I couldn’t agree more about the aerial bombardment from our feathered friends. I’m particularly affected by pigeons in our corner of the forest. They’re ‘Rats of the Sky’ and definitely no pals of mine🤬.

Its the cost that I’m struggling with. Plus my car is about to turn two years old. Dya think I’m a bit late to the wrap party?!

PeteTP

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A good coating of quality wax will go a long way to lessen the potential damage from bird lime 

Even though my car is ceramic coated I apply some Meg's Ultimate to the horizontal surfaces and so far, so good. My previous RC, also ceramic coated didn't have a wax applied and suffered two attacks that needed a detailer's intervention 

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54 minutes ago, PeteTP said:

Las Palmas I couldn’t agree more about the aerial bombardment from our feathered friends. I’m particularly affected by pigeons in our corner of the forest. They’re ‘Rats of the Sky’ and definitely no pals of mine🤬.

Its the cost that I’m struggling with. Plus my car is about to turn two years old. Dya think I’m a bit late to the wrap party?!

PeteTP

I didn’t mention pigeons specifically, but you’re absolutely right about the extra protection that a wrap gives.  We’re in the country too and even provide housing for nesting wood pigeons.

But apparently they’re aware of the injunction not to do it on your own doorstep, so our cars are rarely so gifted.  Even then, the ceramic coatings are an effective barrier.

But it’s certainly best removed as soon as it’s spotted.

Are you too late?  Definitely not.  The benefits start from the moment it’s applied.  In fact it doesn’t help to delay because the paintwork may require more preparation.

We’ve had discussions here involving new car buyers who have taken their recently delivered asset straight round to a Detailer for - at least - ceramic coating.

I think the cost is best regarded as a percentage of the purchase price.  So the newer the car, the better value it seems.  But also consider how long you plan to keep the car - and the impact on its potential resale value.

And finally, is there some thing else you’d rather spend the money on?

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Oh you’re tempting me LenT. I think I need to get firm figures for total cost to either ‘put up, or shut up’.

Here in East Anglia I’m not aware of more than 2 places that offer this service. The results of one (on a friend’s car) I found to unimpressive. The other provider did a great job on a MBZi saw, but they’re an hour away.

Child 1, who sowed this acorn in my swede, is very keen on a place in the nation’s capital. However, before I’ve even checked, I think you need a footballer’s salary for that outfit, brilliant though they are.

Mulling ops continue!

TVM as always.

PeteTP

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15 hours ago, NemesisUK said:

If you are going for something different, wrapping is the way... 😎:punk:

maxresdefault.jpg

If you want to freshen up tired paintwork, the prep work is likely to far outstrip the wrapping costs!

Be aware reversing (unwrapping) the car to original can sometimes end up with even more work to make it presentable.

 

15 hours ago, NemesisUK said:

If you are going for something different, wrapping is the way... 😎:punk:

maxresdefault.jpg

 

If this is a UK car, I do wonder what description goes on the V5C registration? 

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Hmmm. Think I’d describe that on the list of colour options as ‘acquired taste’ or something similar.

Im considering nothing more funky than  what is (clear) cling film. Pricey cling film well applied at that!!

PeteTP

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1 hour ago, PeteTP said:

Las Palmas I couldn’t agree more about the aerial bombardment from our feathered friends. I’m particularly affected by pigeons in our corner of the forest. They’re ‘Rats of the Sky’ and definitely no pals of mine🤬.

Its the cost that I’m struggling with. Plus my car is about to turn two years old. Dya think I’m a bit late to the wrap party?!

PeteTP

Some of the colours will show little bumps more than normal paint does, so if all you really want to avoid is getting rid of the paint damage from bird poo coating may be a good idea.

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4 minutes ago, PeteTP said:

Oh you’re tempting me LenT. I think I need to get firm figures for total cost to either ‘put up, or shut up’.

Like many folk, Pete, I have no problem spending other people’s money!

When we were suffering ‘lockdown’ I invested what we would have otherwise spent on driving out for good lunches in fine country pubs and restaurants, on four days of ‘Detailing’.  That was my rationalisation.

In fact I’d only just discovered detailing.  I only discovered wrapping afterwards.  But at my age my driving years are limited, so as an investment it may not be so attractive.  I suspect that the car may outlast me anyway.

On the other hand….  🤔

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2 minutes ago, dutchie01 said:

What is the price of a good quality wrap from a reputable company compared to a total respray of the car?

Good point well made 👍.

PeteTP

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48 minutes ago, dutchie01 said:

What is the price of a good quality wrap from a reputable company compared to a total respray of the car?

I’m sure that getting comparable estimates would be interesting.  I imagine that much of the prep work would be the same - apart from not needing to mask for a wrap.

But surely after a respray what you end up with is a fresh coat of paint which is still as vulnerable to bird droppings, tree lime, stone chipping and so on, as it was before - but without the degree of self-healing that a wrap can provide.

Perhaps an interesting question is if any manufacturer is ever going to offer a wrap fresh off the production line, as an optional extra?

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1 minute ago, LenT said:

Perhaps an interesting question is if any manufacturer is ever going to offer a wrap fresh off the production line, as an optional extra?

Is applying a wrap to 'fresh' paint recommended?

If a manufacturer were to offer a wrap it may add time to delivery, or maybe more scope to use a dealer's stock car?

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1 hour ago, NemesisUK said:

Is applying a wrap to 'fresh' paint recommended?

If a manufacturer were to offer a wrap it may add time to delivery, or maybe more scope to use a dealer's stock car?

A question beyond my pay grade, unfortunately.
Yes, you’re quite right that new paint does go through a hardening process.  Maybe that’s why wrapping is not offered.

But then again maybe a dealer could do so, as you suggest.

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6 hours ago, dutchie01 said:

What is the price of a good quality wrap from a reputable company compared to a total respray of the car?

It does depend on how good a respray your are looking for - remove the whole interior to do it properly if changing the colour will cost a lot.

I don't think they are comparable though - a wrap is reversible. Resprays are covering up accident damage in the eyes of the motor trade when selling your vehicle. 🤣

 

7 hours ago, LenT said:

 

If this is a UK car, I do wonder what description goes on the V5C registration? 

I wonder if the DVLA will accept psychedelic.

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