newtolexus2017

A novice's master plan to caring for the IS300H...

Recommended Posts

Hello everyone,

 

This forum has been an absolute god-send so far so thanks for all the advice everyone's been putting in. I'm picking up my IS300h F-sport in F-sport white this weekend and want to start thinking about all the kit I will need to care for it properly. I've read around a bit but I'm really a complete novice when it comes to maintaining a car, so want to get your thoughts around my "master plan" for trying to keep the car in mint condition...

 

Exterior :

1. Body: Get 2 buckets and wash with soapy water using a sponge, then wipe clean with micro-fibre cloth. Every 6 months, apply generic car wax (ebay/amazon?) and buff off using micro fibre cloth. Do I even need things like Meguiar (never used anything like that before).

2. Wheels: Again, use bucket/soapy water/sponge to clean the break dust / other dirt off the rims. Is that sufficient? 

3. Windows: We live in a car water area so it's a bit annoying but I'm assuming nothing more than soapy water and sponge.

Interior:

1. F-sport seats: hoover and micro fibre

2. Carpets: hoover

3. Plastics/leather: micro fibre, and leather wipes?

 

Please now rip it apart...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

1. Wash with a lambs wool mitt rather than a sponge. Rinse well and dry with one or two large drying towels. If you use a good quality wax such as Collinite 915 you should be able to go a good 3months between waxing. Just check how the water beads to see when it needs doing again.

2. Use Wheel Woolies to get into the barrel of the wheels and keep the insides clean. Again a good quality wax will help make cleaning easier.

3. I usually finish the windows with a proprietary glass cleaner, get rid of those annoying smears and water spots.

Inside

1. Vacuum seats carefully then wipe down with a damp microfibre cloth, dry with another clean cloth. Every 2-3 months a good clean with a cloth dampened with 5% wool detergent in water. Wipe over with clean cloth dampened with clean water. Dry.

2. Vacuum carpets after removing the over mats. Give the mats a good beating!

3. wipe trim with an interior quick detailer spray applied with a microfibre cloth.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

13 minutes ago, NemesisUK said:

1. Wash with a lambs wool mitt rather than a sponge. Rinse well and dry with one or two large drying towels. If you use a good quality wax such as Collinite 915 you should be able to go a good 3months between waxing. Just check how the water beads to see when it needs doing again.

2. Use Wheel Woolies to get into the barrel of the wheels and keep the insides clean. Again a good quality wax will help make cleaning easier.

3. I usually finish the windows with a proprietary glass cleaner, get rid of those annoying smears and water spots.

Inside

1. Vacuum seats carefully then wipe down with a damp microfibre cloth, dry with another clean cloth. Every 2-3 months a good clean with a cloth dampened with 5% wool detergent in water. Wipe over with clean cloth dampened with clean water. Dry.

2. Vacuum carpets after removing the over mats. Give the mats a good beating!

3. wipe trim with an interior quick detailer spray applied with a microfibre cloth.

Thanks! It sounds like all I will need is to check out some lambs wool mitt, collinite 915 wax, some wheel woollies and glass cleaner.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To add to NemesisUK's very good advice. I'd recommend getting into the habit of doing a "pre-wash" instead of going straight to the bucket & mitt. That way you can remove or loosen most of the dirt without even touching the bodywork directly, which'll minimize the risk of scratches and swirls.

I used to enjoy using snow foam for this purpose, and I might start doing so again when the better weather arrives...but lately, I've been soaking the car with PowerMaxed TFR diluted to around 1:10 ratio with a cheap ASDA Pump Sprayer. Whilst it dwells on the bodywork for around 10mins, I then work the product into the badges, wheels, nooks & crannies etc with some cheap soft detailing brushes and then thoroughly rinse off with a pressure washer.

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, J Henderson said:

To add to NemesisUK's very good advice. I'd recommend getting into the habit of doing a "pre-wash" instead of going straight to the bucket & mitt. That way you can remove or loosen most of the dirt without even touching the bodywork directly, which'll minimize the risk of scratches and swirls.

I used to enjoy using snow foam for this purpose, and I might start doing so again when the better weather arrives...but lately, I've been soaking the car with PowerMaxed TFR diluted to around 1:10 ratio with a cheap ASDA Pump Sprayer. Whilst it dwells on the bodywork for around 10mins, I then work the product into the badges, wheels, nooks & crannies etc with some cheap soft detailing brushes and then thoroughly rinse off with a pressure washer.

 

Thanks very much!

 

But after using this Asda product (thanks for this as I live just 15 mins drive to a massive one), and then using a pressure washer, is there any need to use a bucket / wool mitts at all...?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is if you want your car spotlessly clean, but I sometimes just perform the above "touchless wash" and leave as is if I'm pushed for time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/15/2017 at 2:01 PM, newtolexus2017 said:

Hello everyone,

 

This forum has been an absolute god-send so far so thanks for all the advice everyone's been putting in. I'm picking up my IS300h F-sport in F-sport white this weekend and want to start thinking about all the kit I will need to care for it properly. I've read around a bit but I'm really a complete novice when it comes to maintaining a car, so want to get your thoughts around my "master plan" for trying to keep the car in mint condition...

 

Exterior :

1. Body: Get 2 buckets and wash with soapy water using a sponge, then wipe clean with micro-fibre cloth. Every 6 months, apply generic car wax (ebay/amazon?) and buff off using micro fibre cloth. Do I even need things like Meguiar (never used anything like that before).

2. Wheels: Again, use bucket/soapy water/sponge to clean the break dust / other dirt off the rims. Is that sufficient? 

3. Windows: We live in a car water area so it's a bit annoying but I'm assuming nothing more than soapy water and sponge.

Interior:

1. F-sport seats: hoover and micro fibre

2. Carpets: hoover

3. Plastics/leather: micro fibre, and leather wipes?

 

Please now rip it apart...

You may find the following thread useful. 

I have a complete detailing guide available to download in there. 

Additionally, I wouldn't advise using TFR unless doing a full detail. It degrades any protection on the car, especially the PowerMaxed TFR (ask me how I know)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, I did wonder if the TFR was aggressive to any protection. No doubt it gets the car clean tho!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
52 minutes ago, Farqui said:

Thanks, I did wonder if the TFR was aggressive to any protection. No doubt it gets the car clean tho!

Its actually pretty potent stuff. 

From my experience, it can stain the plastics and paint. Quite a few of my friends (who dont know better and use hand/automatic car washes) have had issues with it. 

Its a hit with the car wash guys though, gets the car clean without having to do much!

Top tip right here - when buying a relatively young second hand car, check the sills under the doors. If they're bubbling/rusted 90% of the time its had TFR around the bottom.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎16‎/‎03‎/‎2017 at 9:02 PM, rayaans said:

Its actually pretty potent stuff. 

From my experience, it can stain the plastics and paint. Quite a few of my friends (who dont know better and use hand/automatic car washes) have had issues with it. 

Its a hit with the car wash guys though, gets the car clean without having to do much!

Top tip right here - when buying a relatively young second hand car, check the sills under the doors. If they're bubbling/rusted 90% of the time its had TFR around the bottom.

I don't know how I missed this before but just opened up your PDF guide on how to detail the lexus.

So far I've washed the car using a mild soapy solution and will check out your guide on how to wax etc this weekend... will let you know how it goes.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cleanyourcar is a great website - super customer service and the loyalty cash back really adds up :-)

I recommend the carlacl car shampoo as it's wax friendly and helps re-grease the surface.

I've previously been a fan of Collinite 576s for a black Civic that I had between 2007-2010, superb beading and longevity, better than the 915 I used on subsequent Red Golf GTD. But then I found Bilt Hamber - and their products are really excellent, the beading doesn't quite top the 576s but it's much easier to use and lasts 5-6 months before I need to redo it. Their clay bars are excellent as well!

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK, if TFR is a no-no, and I don't have a snowfoam lance, what should I use for, and how do I apply it, as a pre wash?  Usually I give the car a good hose down with a spray attachment, I don't like the thought of a power washer.  

The car has Poorboys Black Hole, AG SRP, followed by AG UGP.   I used to use BH Autobalm, but found it harder to work with, so reverted to AG.

I use Megs Last Touch as a drying aid, (and watermark remover if necessary as I live in a very hard water area) after each wash.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well you could still use a PH-neutral snowfoam, but through a pump sprayer instead of a pressure washer and lance.

 

FWIW, I've not had any issues using the TFR mentioned earlier. The manufacturer claims its "LSP safe" when diluted to approx 1:10 ratio and that's how I've been using it.

It will no doubt erode any protection on the car faster than the aforementioned snowfoam but that's of no concern to me personally as I enjoy detailing my car and will apply umpteen coats of wax/sealant over the course of a year.

 

I would definitely think twice about using a TFR if I had shelled out big bucks for a professionally-applied ceramic coating though! ☺

 

Sent from my SM-G935F using Tapatalk

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's the interior cleaning that concerns me, I got just the smallest drop of Auto Glym Plastic and rubber cleaner on the sat nav screen and it left a mark when I tried to remove it, luckily at the bottom of the screen so not that visible. The screens are so delicate that anything marks it. I think I'll going to make a little cut out template to cover the screen when I'm cleaning it. 

The Autoglym certainly hide some of marks I had above the glove box near the passenger airbag.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello,

I've just finished my first ever "detailing" of the car. So:

1. Washed - used Autglym Shampoo Conditioner. This felt almost like water because it's not very concentrated after mixing in accordance with instructions, however it does remove all the dirt and the water that comes back is pretty much black...

2. Polished - used Autoglym Super Resin Polish. I was so wary of using this after reading the comments about how it's removing a layer of paint, so I was pretty gentle and initially I was quite dubious as to whether it was doing anything at all. But after buffing it off, I could see that there were no swirls anymore which really made quite a massive difference to how the car looked.

3. Glazed - used Autoglym Extra Gloss Protection. This was wonderful - it was a liquid so had to be pretty careful not to get it everywhere, took 30 minutes to dry before buffing off but then the car just felt so much more protected, very reflective and clean.

The proof will be in the pudding however so will see how it feels like to wash with shampoo next week and how long the protective gloss protection actually lasts!

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, baxlin said:

OK, if TFR is a no-no, and I don't have a snowfoam lance, what should I use for, and how do I apply it, as a pre wash?  Usually I give the car a good hose down with a spray attachment, I don't like the thought of a power washer.  

The car has Poorboys Black Hole, AG SRP, followed by AG UGP.   I used to use BH Autobalm, but found it harder to work with, so reverted to AG.

I use Megs Last Touch as a drying aid, (and watermark remover if necessary as I live in a very hard water area) after each wash.

Snowfoam in one of those cheap pressurized sprayers works fairly well. 

Ive never needed to use TFR to be honest - (and I managed to get concrete on my car once) 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, newtolexus2017 said:

Hello,

I've just finished my first ever "detailing" of the car. So:

1. Washed - used Autglym Shampoo Conditioner. This felt almost like water because it's not very concentrated after mixing in accordance with instructions, however it does remove all the dirt and the water that comes back is pretty much black...

Yes, I've been using this for a few years and even if you put in double or triple the recommended dosage, it will never be mega soapy with loads of suds. Half-way through a car and I will sometimes have to double-check which is the wash bucket and which is the rinse. It is good stuff though and just a basic wash with it and nothing else will leave a car nice and shiny since it has some gloss-enhancers and leaves a wax-like finish. Their new Ultra High Definition shampoo is the one to go for if you want rich and long-lasting soapy suds.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, newtolexus2017 said:

Hello,

I've just finished my first ever "detailing" of the car. So:

1. Washed - used Autglym Shampoo Conditioner. This felt almost like water because it's not very concentrated after mixing in accordance with instructions, however it does remove all the dirt and the water that comes back is pretty much black...

2. Polished - used Autoglym Super Resin Polish. I was so wary of using this after reading the comments about how it's removing a layer of paint, so I was pretty gentle and initially I was quite dubious as to whether it was doing anything at all. But after buffing it off, I could see that there were no swirls anymore which really made quite a massive difference to how the car looked.

3. Glazed - used Autoglym Extra Gloss Protection. This was wonderful - it was a liquid so had to be pretty careful not to get it everywhere, took 30 minutes to dry before buffing off but then the car just felt so much more protected, very reflective and clean.

The proof will be in the pudding however so will see how it feels like to wash with shampoo next week and how long the protective gloss protection actually lasts!

 

Dont worry about bubbles

Lubricity makes the difference - suds just look pretty

The only problem with the AG Shampoo Conditioner is that it has lots of "extra" bits in it. PITA if you have a sealant/wax other than AG on the car as it interferes with the beading of the original product by layering itself on top of it. 

I personally prefer Carchem 1900:1. Hands down best shampoo ive used.  I think I bought it in 5l of Leather Oak scent - gives a nice woody smell

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/04/2017 at 4:03 PM, newtolexus2017 said:

Hello,

I've just finished my first ever "detailing" of the car. So:

1. Washed - used Autglym Shampoo Conditioner. This felt almost like water because it's not very concentrated after mixing in accordance with instructions, however it does remove all the dirt and the water that comes back is pretty much black...

2. Polished - used Autoglym Super Resin Polish. I was so wary of using this after reading the comments about how it's removing a layer of paint, so I was pretty gentle and initially I was quite dubious as to whether it was doing anything at all. But after buffing it off, I could see that there were no swirls anymore which really made quite a massive difference to how the car looked.

3. Glazed - used Autoglym Extra Gloss Protection. This was wonderful - it was a liquid so had to be pretty careful not to get it everywhere, took 30 minutes to dry before buffing off but then the car just felt so much more protected, very reflective and clean.

The proof will be in the pudding however so will see how it feels like to wash with shampoo next week and how long the protective gloss protection actually lasts!

 

This is exactly what Did on a Civc I had in Nighthawk black! It looked ace and you'll find a quick wash once a week is all you need now! If it were me id also top the EGP with some collinite 576s

rhe tricky thing now is the water marks and drying - I've just washed my IS (it's in Velvet black and 2.5 weeks old!) and I already have swirl marks which is so annoying on black cars they really stick out!

Need to get myself a decent silicon blade and plan in some SPR to fill those swirls myself!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I never dry my cars..  I always rinse with a twin DI vessel setup I have and never have water spots .. Worth a go :thumbsup:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, TechyD said:

This is exactly what Did on a Civc I had in Nighthawk black! It looked ace and you'll find a quick wash once a week is all you need now! If it were me id also top the EGP with some collinite 576s

rhe tricky thing now is the water marks and drying - I've just washed my IS (it's in Velvet black and 2.5 weeks old!) and I already have swirl marks which is so annoying on black cars they really stick out!

Need to get myself a decent silicon blade and plan in some SPR to fill those swirls myself!

 

Why would you put 476s on it?

Its a pure wax with nothing else in it so actually won't change the appearance - only the beading and longevity.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, TechyD said:

rhe tricky thing now is the water marks and drying - I've just washed my IS (it's in Velvet black and 2.5 weeks old!) and I already have swirl marks which is so annoying on black cars they really stick out!

Need to get myself a decent silicon blade and plan in some SPR to fill those swirls myself!

 

DI water rinse is the way forward. No water marks and no need to dry...

http://www.theultimatefinish.co.uk/aqua-gleam/0ppm-de-ionising-water-filter-12.aspx

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, rayaans said:

Why would you put 476s on it?

Its a pure wax with nothing else in it so actually won't change the appearance - only the beading and longevity.

Ummm...exactly those reasons! Plus it's detergent proof, or at least pretty good at it as long as you don't use the wash and wax all in products or very strong shampoos.

I found adding it as a top layer really finished it off - super smooth paint work, easy to clean and long lasting, 6 months in my experience :-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Similar Content

    • By colin79666
      Yesterday was good weather wise for car washing (i.e. above freezing) so I thought I'd share my cleaning routine that I follow every 2 or 3 weeks depending on weather. I do about 250 miles a week so this is a clean every 500-750 miles across mixed roads in southern Scotland.
      The aim of this isn't a super detail but something to keep the worst of the grim and road salt at bay and that can be completed in under an hour when the outside temperature isn't conducive to spending too long on the job! I prefer to do it with my own equipment as the stuff at the supermarket jet wash is rather harsh and can strip wax.
      A couple of pictures first to show the built up of winter grime.

       
      First up a good layer of snow foam to drag off the worst without risking scratching.
       
      After giving it 5 minutes to dwell and a light rinse with the pressure washer (nothing too fierce at this stage) about 90% of the dirt has been removed.
       
      Next up are the wheels. I give each a spray of cleaner, give it a couple of minutes and then wash off at about 80% pressure.
       
      Next up with the main wash. Speed is of the essence so I go with spraying on the wash/wax solution. I then wipe this over using 2 buckets and 2 wash mitts (one for the top and the other the lower parts).

      Finally the suds are rinsed off at 80% pressure and the windows cleaned. Results:

       
      Products used:
      Pressure washer - Karcher K4 Bog standard buckets, one with a Grit Guard Wash Mitts - Meguiar's Lambs Wool Foam lance - Elite Car Care Foam - Bilt Hamber Auto Foam Wheels - Bilt Hamber Auto Wheel Cleaner Wash - Autoglym Pressure Wash Windscreen - Autoglym Fast Glass Other windows and mirrors - Rain X 2 in 1 I do a good clean in autumn including wax with Armour All Shield that lasts well into winter so the dirt doesn't stick too bad. Inside I apply Gtechniq I1 to rain/snow coming in doesn't soak the seats or carpet. Come late spring the clay bar will come out to remove the ingrained stuff like tar sports that have accumulated over winter and I'll spend a full day pouring over it.
    • By Thackeray
      For a long time I’ve been puzzled by the Which? magazine review of the IS 300h. In their initial report they made it a Best Buy but a few months later downgraded it. Its website version of the review currently says: “Best Buy award removed. It's a very good car, but we found the Lexus IS emits so much CO (carbon monoxide) in our tests, that it would fail to meet any EU emissions limits set this century. As such, we cannot possibly recommend it.”
      Despite this negative review, there were lots of things I liked about the car, plus some ratings that sounded impressive:
      Best in class for 2013 NCAP safety World’s most efficient production petrol engine when launched, at 38.5%. (It was overtaken by a Honda six months later.) Routinely at top of reliability ratings. I was also doubtful about the Which? mpg figures. Their claim of 97 mpg around town was obviously nonsense and the motorway figure of 34 mpg looked doubtful too. They say their tests are performed in a laboratory but they don’t give enough detail to tell how they get to these extreme figures. I thought if the carbon monoxide figures are based on the same testing, they’re just as likely to be wrong. So I went ahead and bought an IS300h.
      I’ve searched in the past for some other independent CO test reports and couldn’t find any. Until today.
      But first, what is Which? claiming? They say it wouldn’t meet EU carbon monoxide emission limits set this century. I take this to mean Euro 4 in January 2005. (There was Euro 3 in January 2000 but that was the last year of last century.) The limit for petrol cars under Euro 4 is 1 gram per kilometre (g/km) of CO.  So they’re saying the IS300h emits more than 1 g/km.
      For a long time I had no way of knowing if that was true or not. But at last I’ve found a website that shows real-world emissions test results. It’s called EQUA Index and they test cars by driving them around real roads monitoring the emissions from the exhaust pipe on a three and a half hour run. They give the IS300h their top rating of A++. This represents a band from zero to 0.125 g/km of carbon monoxide. (Their result is for the 2017 model but I don’t think there are any significant differences to the engine from the 2013 model. Please correct me if I’m wrong.)
      By contrast, Which? says CO emissions are more than eight times this figure. 
      I know nothing about EQUA; I’ve only just come across it. But I’m more inclined to believe that real-world testing on roads will give a more accurate figure than a short test in a laboratory.
    • By igotthechronicbythetree
      Hi all,
       
      I'm new to the forum and also the Lexus brand.
       
      I've just recently bought a 2010 IS250 F Sport with 34k (now 35k) miles. It's a commuter car for work as I drive on the M25 and A2 everyday in Kent, so needed a nice auto for the daily 64 mile round trip. It's Argento Silver with a lot of options on it as I wanted one with the nav and memory seats, saw plenty without them too.
       
      Only took pics this morning, needs a good wash, clay bar and wax:
       


       
      Loved it so far, very smooth and comfortable. The suspension seems a bit stiffer now I'm living with it daily, but it's still very compliant. It's more the potholes or nasty ridges in the road that vibrate through the cabin. Just sorted the door unlocking last night as it wouldn't open the passenger door when I stopped or opened my door. Now the doors lock when starting the engine and shifting out of park and lock when shifting into park on stopping the engine, perfect! MPG was good on the way back from Stockport, sitting at around 40-43 mpg over 250 miles of mostly motorway. On a new tank of more realistic town and motorway, it's around 32-33 mpg which I think is very good considering the engine size and being an auto.
       
      Things I love about the car - the looks, the seats, the 18 inch alloys, rear camera, Bluetooth streaming, electric seats and steering column, memory function, keyless entry and start.
       
      A quick query while I have some attention, do people use the ECT power mode switch or leave it as standard? Only just read about it last night on this forum, elsewhere and also in the Lexus manual.
       
      Any more hints and tips would be greatly appreciated!
    • By Rashi
      Hi Guys,
      I have just joined the club as I am interested in buying IS300h luxury trim 64 plate with 125k miles on it. I like German cars and had BMW 320d and C220 Merc in last few years. Both I bought with 100k+ miles on the board and I never had any issue with them all the time I had them apart from regular services and tyres change. They proved to be economical as well.
      I have read a lot about other Lexus models with high mileage’s but I haven’t read anything about IS300H crossing 100+ and yet keeping inact which German diesels do quite often and quite decently.
      I am still confused as if I should go ahead with it or stick to old school - long lasting diesels?
      I have been following threads in here for quite a few days and found them very interesting and helping. I hope I would also be listened to :))
      Thanks 
    • By Shyamal IS300H-FSPORT
      Hi all, 
      I have recently bought a Lexus IS300h F port and I was told to get a tracker fitted by one of my colleages. I have bought the tracker that was suggested to me but I have no idea where or how to fit it. 
      The instruction manual says to attach it to a 12-36V charger (I'm assuming the 12V Battery in the boot). I have never done anything of this sort before so I just wanted to ask
      a) is it safe for me to try and fit the two leads myself?
      b) would me attaching a tracker to the 12V Battery drain it & cause problems??
      Hope to hear from someone soon.. 
      Shyamal 
       
      Ps: the picture below shows the two leads that I'm supposed to connect to the Battery if it makes sense to anyone