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£100 Note


crazylex
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Bit of a debate here ... and its getting heated !

Does a £100 note exist.

I am sure I have seen one years ago.

I say it does and it will cost me if it doesn't.

My theory, apart from thinking I have seen one is that there is one in Monopoly ! Probably a weak argument but still.

What do you lot think - has anyone seen one or even got one ?

I will confirm a definite answer from my bank manager on Monday

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Bit of a debate here ... and its getting heated !

Does a £100 note exist.

I am sure I have seen one years ago.

I say it does and it will cost me if it doesn't.

My theory, apart from thinking I have seen one is that there is one in Monopoly ! Probably a weak argument but still.

What do you lot think - has anyone seen one or even got one ?

I will confirm a definite answer from my bank manager on Monday

No.......£50 is the largest denomination bill

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Bit of a debate here ... and its getting heated !

Does a £100 note exist.

I am sure I have seen one years ago.

I say it does and it will cost me if it doesn't.

My theory, apart from thinking I have seen one is that there is one in Monopoly ! Probably a weak argument but still.

What do you lot think - has anyone seen one or even got one ?

I will confirm a definite answer from my bank manager on Monday

No.......£50 is the largest denomination bill

bugger - that'll cost me £20 then - maybe I'll ask em if they can change a £100 :D

Just checked BofE site, WTF did I not think of it before - get the Dunce cap out again!

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Well, last Saturday morning I suddenly decided that I should put £100 on Middlesborough to beat Chelski.

But DIDN'T! Would have got maybe 40-1 odds?

So £20 aint TOO bad, but...... :duh:

Wow I bet you were p****d with that.

Trouble is a £10 is for the muppet from this thread link

So how clever am I :hehe:

Anyway Its my co and he works for me, so I think I just give him it when I knock his wages for being late this morning :P

Legal to spend anywhere in the UK :winky:

Look's like your a winner :D

:D

If I get it off em I'll split it with you

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There's no ENGLISH £100 note, but there's a scottish one which is legal tender in England provided it's Bank of Scotland and not Clydesdale... (Not sure why Clydesdale notes are no longer accepted in most places in England when they apparently are still in Scotland, but that's another matter for debate).

L.

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depends how your wager was worded,

Bank notes issued by the banks in Scotland and Northern Ireland are required to be backed pound for pound by Bank of England notes. Due to the large number of notes issued by these banks it would be cumbersome and wasteful to hold Bank of England notes in the standard denominations. Special one million pound notes are used for this purpose. These are used only internally within the Bank and are never seen in circulation.

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Bank notes issued by the Bank of England must be backed by Gold reserves to the equivalent value of the notes issued.

@ lelandv - What about RBS one of the biggest financial institutions in the UK? They still print notes! The reason why Clydesdale Bank notes are not accepted is because everyone in England says WHO!

Bank notes are just that, a note, an open cheque issued by a bank promising to pay the bearer the sum of whatever.

So if I walk into Threadneedle Street and say "give me ten pounds for that" handing over a tenner what do I get :question:

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A bank note is a bearer bond saying that the bank will pay whatever amount to the person with that piece of paper.

So go in with a tenner and someome has to go to the vault and produce £10 worth of gold, except the gold is not actually there.

Back on topic, all the Scottish banks (BoS, RBS and Clydesdale) issue £100 notes and AFAIK the Bank of England don't .

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the reason Clydsdale notes are not genrally acepted by english places is to do with the wording on the note, clydesdale are made under liesense, where as the RBS and bank of england are not the wording of the"i promise to pay the bearer" bit is different on clydesdale notes

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@ lelandv - What about RBS one of the biggest financial institutions in the UK? They still print notes! The reason why Clydesdale Bank notes are not accepted is because everyone in England says WHO!

Yea.. forgot to mention RBS... both BS and RBS notes are accepted, but Clydesdale, as you so nicely said ... "WHO ?!?" ;)

L.

"I promise to pay the bearer the sum of ..... pounds".

So our money is nothing more than an I.O.U. ;)

Since we are, effectively, creditors of the banks in this case, do we get to see the credit reports for the various banks ? (they sure as hell get to see ours... so I think they should reciprocate) ;)

L.

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I knew the notes and coins for that matter, are just effectively IOU's against a pile of gold.

But I thought the gold does exist in the bank of england vault or somewhere, I'm sure it must :crybaby:

Bazza - is you £100 note orange ? I have a wad of those, and pink £500's :D

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But I thought the gold does exist in the bank of england vault or somewhere, I'm sure it must :crybaby:

It does exist, what I ment was it is not in the basement of Threadneedle Street. Bank underground station is there.

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The reason Clydesdale notes are not genrally acepted by english places is to do with the wording on the note, clydesdale are made under liesense, where as the RBS and bank of england are not the wording of the"i promise to pay the bearer" bit is different on clydesdale notes

The Clydesdale Bank £20 note I'm looking at now states "Clydesdale Bank PLC promise to pay to the bearer on demand at their office here twenty pounds sterling"

Subtle difference in wording, which no doubts means that CB will honour it, but some other banks are finicky.

No problem with CB though. It's actually owned by an Australian bank.

I'm originally from England, but on moving up here in the 70's, I was surprised to find so many strange banks in Scotland, each with their own notes. The odd one pound note even turns up now and again. There were also other quirks like pubs shutting at 10.00 pm and the odd sight of people throwing up in Aberdeen city centre in bright sunshine when the pubs turned out :sick: That's history now though.

IanB :D

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There's no ENGLISH £100 note, but there's a scottish one which is legal tender in England provided it's Bank of Scotland and not Clydesdale... (Not sure why Clydesdale notes are no longer accepted in most places in England when they apparently are still in Scotland, but that's another matter for debate).

L.

No Scottish bank notes are "Legal tender" anywhere including Scotland. The only bank notes that are legal tender are Bank of England notes, and they are only legal tender in England and Wales. They are of course legal currency and can and are used to pay debts i.e. buy things.

Legal tender is an old ruling which is very rerely used these days for obvious reasons. Credit cards, debit cards and cheques are not legal tender so the country would grind to a halt if the laws of legal tender were still applied.

Legal tender limits the amount of coins below £1 which you can offer to clear a debt. You can pay with any amount of £1 coins so collect enough and buy your next Lexus with £1 coins. Oh! you will also need a truck and forklift when going to collect your new Lexus and a camera to photograph the salesmans face when you show him the cash. :lol:

oldun :ohmy:

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well after a convo with my missus tonight thats not quite true english notes are no more legal than scottish notes in scotland,

and as oldun says the country would ground to a halt if the laws were applied the following doc tells all (ps if your bet stated that he 100 quid note was not legal tender well i am afraid you lost old son)

This explains all about scottish notes, and some about english for that matter

:D

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well after a convo with my missus tonight thats not quite true english notes are no more legal than scottish notes in scotland,

and as oldun says the country would ground to a halt if the laws were applied the following doc tells all (ps if your bet stated that he 100 quid note was not legal tender well i am afraid you lost old son)

This explains all about scottish notes, and some about english for that matter

:D

If you read my statement correctly you would see that I said legal tender. This has nothing to do with legal currency. PS the £100 pound note is NOT legal tender anywhere. Please check the meaning of "Legal Tender"

oldun :duh:

This might help.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Gold Sovereigns are Still Legal Tender

Legal Tender & British Coins

Are Scottish & Northern Irish notes legal tender? In short ‘No’ these notes are not legal tender; only Bank of England notes are legal tender but only in England and Wales. The term legal tender does not in itself govern the acceptability of banknotes in transactions. Whether or not notes have legal tender status, their acceptability as a means of payment is essentially a matter for agreement between the parties involved. Legal tender has a very narrow technical meaning in relation to the settlement of debt. If a debtor pays in legal tender the exact amount he owes under the terms of a contract, he has good defence in law if he is subsequently sued for non-payment of the debt. In ordinary everyday transactions, the term ‘legal tender’ has very little practical application.

The following is a summary of the currently produced British circulating coins, plus the five pounds:-

Denomination Legal Tender Limit

£5 Crown Any Amount

£2 Any Amount

£1 Any Amount

50 Pence £10

25 Pence (Older Crowns) £10

20 Pence £10

10 Pence £5

5 Pence £5

2 Pence £0.20

1 Penny £0.20

Notes

Denomination = Face Value

Legal Tender Limit = Any amount up to the maximum shown

Older Crowns = Crowns dated before 1990

oldun :lol:

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